Carnegie Mellon University

Class Notes

Find out what’s new with Dietrich College alumni and students. Have news to share? Let us know.

The Class Notes section is organized by the date the announcement was made. To search for classmates from a specific year, use the search function.

Please note, due to the college's name change to the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the indicia is now "DC."

September 2017

Susan LaFiandra Reid (DC’90) was recently promoted to manager of the Utility Engineering and Surveying Institute (UESI) of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). Reid has been with ASCE for more than 8 years, previously with the Structural Engineering Institute (SEI). UESI is ASCE’s newest technical institute and is the organizer of the ASCE’s popular annual Pipelines Conference. Susan’s responsibilities include developing the conference technical program, working with the UESI Board of Governors, UESI communications, marketing, membership development, and publications. Susan lives with her husband and three sons in Virginia.

Jeffrey Thibert (DC’01) was recently appointed the Paul and Maureen Stefanick Director of the Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement at the University of Notre Dame. Named for Dan and Patricia Flatley, the Flatley Center promotes the intellectual development of undergraduate students through scholarly engagement, research, creative endeavors and the pursuit of fellowships. A concurrent assistant professional specialist in the College of Arts & Letters, he had served as acting director of the center since January. Learn more.

Katie Kowall Reed (DC'02) recently accepted a position as a Historic Preservation Planner with Michael Baker International in Moon, PA. Reed is looking forward to returning to the Pittsburgh area and working to preserve historic infrastructure and support the development of sympathetic infill in the region.

Shreejoy Tripathy (DC'13), a Ph.D. graduate in neural computation from the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition’s (CNBC), is now a postdoc in the Pavlidis Lab at the University of British Columbia, studying neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Learn more.

Zaria Howard, a junior in CMU’s School of Art who is pursuing a degree in art and statistics, is working alongside David Newbury, enterprise software and data architect at J. Paul Getty Trust, and Golan Levin, professor of Art who is leading a project that is aiming to identify, annotate and organize the massive body of work of photographer Charles “Teenie” Harris. The project has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to create a set of image identification tools using machine learning and computer vision techniques. Read more.

August 2017

Patrick Cavanagh (DC'72), a world-renowned vision scientist, recently joined Glendon College as a senior research fellow in its Department of Psychology. Cavanagh has pioneered new directions in the area of spatial and temporal resolution of visual attention, and his groundbreaking discoveries have been supported by numerous grants from research councils in Europe, the U.S. and Canada. Learn more.

Recently, Jonathan Barnes (DC'93) won another Azbee Award with ENR News. The Silver National Award for Excellence is for a series on Workers Voices.

Kent James (DC'05) wrote a commentary piece about the failure of Republican health care plans being good for everyone, including Republican politicians. Learn more.

A graduate of the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC), Gustavo Sudre (DC'12) has taken his Ph.D. training in Neural Computation to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Using a combination of machine learning techniques, genomics and neuroimaging to study brain systems, Sudre now focuses on integrating genomic and neuroimaging analysis when investigating complex behaviors. Learn more.

Nina Mast (DC'14), a researcher at Media Matters for America, analyzed President Trump's Twitter interactions for more than a year and found interesting results based on factors used to identify suspicious behavior. Learn more.  

Originally coming to CMU to become an orthodontist, Kyla Vick (DC'15) is now entering her second year at Washington University School of Law. Since CMU, she has seen the inside of a federal courtroom and secured a position as a summer associate at an exclusive Chicago law firm. Learn more.

A new member of the Chautauqua Institution staff, Atom Atkinson (DC'15) is now taking their talents to the lakeside educational community and is thinking about new ways on how to transform their literary arts experiences. Learn more.

Current graduate student Ron Yurko and alumnus Maksim Horowitz (DC'16) were recently interviewed by the Pittsburgh Post Gazette about nflscrapR, a statistical software they created that displays data from every NFL play since 2009. Learn more.

Jessica Wallach (DC'16) recently received a Fulbright research grant to Senegal. 

Caitlin Drummond, who just received her Ph.D. in behavioral decision research, co-authored a study with the Institute of Politics and Strategy’s Baruch Fischhoff on how more education increases scientific polarization for controversial topics like evolution and climate change. Learn more about the study, which was published in the Proceedings of the National Academies.

Currently pursuing a degree in international relations and politics, Julia Adams is finishing her summer internship in New Zealand and had the opportunity to also meet the Labour Party's new leader. Learn more

Philip DeCicco (DC’19), an international relations and politics major, and Orchi Banerjee (DC’19), a decision science major, received Critical Language Scholarships (CLS). DeCicco spent the summer in Ibri, Oman studying Arabic, while Banerjee studied Arabic in Meknes, Morocco.

Nathan Healy, a Master of Professional Writing (MAPW) student, won the Department of English’s Erwin R. Steinberg MAPW Scholarship which recognizes a student who has excelled in the program’s style course and exemplifies integrity, intellectual curiosity and citizenship. Learn more.

July 2017

A technical director at Hexagon PPM, Kristina Chess (DC’92) spends her days managing a diverse group of departments in user experience, documentation and development services. In the evenings, Chess meets her husband at their Alabama home, they eat dinner, and she sleeps for a few hours before waking up in what most people would consider the middle of the night. These are Chess’s most creative hours. Learn more

James Longhurst (DC’04), who received his Ph.D. in history and policy, wrote an opinion piece for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on bikes and cars co-existing. Longhurst is an associate professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and the author of “Bike Battles: A History of Sharing the American Road.” Read his op-ed, “A History of Sharing the Road.” 

Alumnus Steve Martocci (DC’04) is splicing together quite a career. His latest endeavor is a cloud-based music creation platform with a library of more than two million sound samples, which can be used by anyone. Learn more

Brittany McCandless (DC’08) wore a wearable tech dress to the 71st Annual Tony Awards on Sunday, June 11. The dress was designed by Sophie Hood (A’14). Learn more

Sam Ventura (DC'10, '11, '15), who received his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in statistics from CMU and has been a visiting assistant professor of statistics, has been hired by the Pittsburgh Penguins to be their full time director of hockey research. Ventura has been serving as an analytics consultant for the Penguins for the past two Stanley Cup-winning seasons. Learn more.

Laurnie Wilson (DC’16) was part of a CMU group that traveled to Poland this summer to learn about the country’s Jewish past and present. Wilson, who majored in creative writing and history and minored in German, was deeply impacted by the experience and is planning a podcast series and documentary to help educate others. Read about the trip

David Rode, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Social and Decision Sciences, was part of a CMU team that analyzed more than a century of power plant construction and retirement data. They concluded that when it comes to the current plans to retire U.S. power plants, we are “running towards a cliff with no fence.” Read more

Incoming first-year student Anirudh Narayanan won first place in the 2017 Microsoft Office Specialist U.S. National Championship in the Excel 2013 category. He will represent the U.S. at the world championships in August. Learn more

May 2017

Matthew Sweigart (DC’80) released a book, "Pathways of Qi: Exercises & Meditations to Guide You Through Your Body’s Life Energy Channels." In the book, Sweigart, an expert in Chinese medicine, shows how to use touch therapy, meditations and gentle Qigong exercises for wellness. Find "Pathways of Qi" on Amazon.

Amy Berger (DC’00), a creative writing alumna and certified nutrition specialist, recently released "The Alzheimer’s Antidote: Using a Low-Carb, High-Fat Diet to Fight Alzheimer’s Disease, Memory Loss, and Cognitive Decline." In it, she presents nutrition and lifestyle tips to prevent, delay and possibly reverse Alzheimer’s disease. Berger suggests that Alzheimer’s results from a "fuel shortage" in the brain: As neurons lose their ability convert glucose into energy, they atrophy and die, leading to memory loss, behavioral changes and other symptoms. Learn more about "The Alzheimer’s Antidote." 

Elizabeth Currid-Halkett (DC’00, HNZ’02) will appear in conversation with author Sloane Crosley to celebrate the publication of Currid-Halkett’s book, "The Sum of Small Things: A Theory of the Aspirational Class" at 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, June 8 at Housing Works Bookstore Café in New York City. Through extensive interviews, Currid-Halkett discusses how a segment of elites—"the aspirational class"—reproduces wealth and upward mobility, deepening the ever-wider class divide. Currid-Halkett is the James Irvine Chair in Urban and Regional Planning and professor of public policy at the University of Southern California. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Salon and the New Yorker, among others. Crosley is the author of the essay collections "I Was Told There’d Be Cake" and "How Did You Get This Number" and the novel "The Clasp." Learn more about the event.

Tria Chang (CMU’07) and Justine Lee (DC’08) created Make America Dinner Again (MADA) to unite individuals with diverse ideologies around the dinner table. The pair said they are open to where MADA may take them, including looking into revenue models like sponsorships. But for the short term, Chang said, "We’d like to get a few more dinners under our belt and focus on building our network." Learn how Chang and Lee are bringing people together.

Alexandra Pasch (DC’17), who majored in international relations and politics and ethics, history and public policy, received a $1,000 scholarship from the Carnegie Mellon Women’s Association for her commitment to the advancement of women in politics. An Andrew Carnegie Scholar and a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Pasch participated in the Washington Semester Program as a sophomore, and quickly became a leader among her peers as she interned with the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee. In the fall of her junior year she accepted a graduate level internship in Belgium with the U.S. Mission to the European Union. Last summer, she earned an internship at the Center for American Women and Politics in her home state of New Jersey. She plans to return to CMU this fall to complete a master's degree in international relations and politics and then attend law school to pursue a career in national security law. Learn more about the scholarship recipients

Josh Zak (CMU’17) earned the Carnegie Mellon Alumni Association’s 2017 Student Service Award at the 67th annual Alumni Awards. A chemistry major and Japanese minor in CMU’s Science and Humanities Scholars (SHS) program, Zak is active in a number of student service organizations, including Fringe, an independent social and service organization, and CMU’s UNICEF and Mortar Board chapters. He also served as head orientation counselor during First-Year Orientation and led Spring Carnival’s booth committee. Read more about Zak’s dedication to helping others.

Six Carnegie Mellon University students have been named Fulbright award winners – and three of them come from the Dietrich College. They are: Melanie Diaz (DC’17), the recipient of a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship award that she will use to teach in La Rioja, Spain; Emily Joyce (DC’17), who will travel to Mexico City for the Fulbright-García Robles Binational Business Internship Program; and Kayla Lee (DC’17), who was awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship that she will use in Ecuador at a public university or English training program. Read more about the Dietrich College Fulbright winners for 2017.

Ten distinguished Dietrich College juniors will spend the summer working on research and creative projects that span from how the U.S. federal court system can restrain an "imperial presidency" to exploring the future of work through poetry. The students’ work is funded through the Dietrich College Honors Fellowship, and gives the fellows a head start on their thesis development. The 2017-18 fellows are: David Beinhart, Isabel Bleimeister, Kyanna Dawson, Jenna Houston, Amber James, Yong H. Kim, Zeyneb Majid, Manvendu Najeevan, Ian Sears and Lauren Yan. Read more about the new fellows and their projects.

Guthrie Scrimgeour (DC’20) was accepted into the Horizon Theater Young Playwrights Festival in Atlanta, Georgia. He is one of 20 high school- and college-aged playwrights selected to participate in the festival, which will include playwriting workshops, seminars and rehearsals with professional theater actors, directors and playwrights. During the weeklong program, participants will develop one-act plays, culminating in a staged reading of their work. Learn more about the festival.

April 2017

Samira Hagerty (née Shaheen) (DC’76, A’83) was selected by the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh to be part of its Group Show Spring Exhibition at the FrameHouse & Jask Gallery.

Mara Cohen Ioannides (DC’92) released her second novel in the fall of 2016 with Hadassa Press. “We Are in Exile/Estamos en Galut” examines the demise of the Jewish community in the city of Rhodes between the two world wars through the lives of one fictional family. Learn more

Amélie Koran (DC’96) recently became deputy chief information officer (DCIO) for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Inspector General. In this role, she oversees and manages the modernization of technology and helps set strategy for the future. She was also selected as one of the “Top Women in Cybersecurity” by CyberScoop during Women’s History Month. Learn more about the award.

Jay Snyder (CMU’02, DC’02) is now a project manager at Auto Grid Systems, which builds software applications for electricity retailers, renewable energy project developers and energy service providers.

Vishwas Prabhakara (DC’02) presented an interactive talk and roundtable discussion as part of the Dietrich College Entrepreneurs Speaker Series, co-sponsored by CMU’s Swartz Center for Entrepreneurship. In “What They Don’t Want You to Know,” Prabhakara shared highlights from his 15-year career, including senior positions at ESPN and Digg and his current role as general manager of Yelp Reservations. Read more and watch a video of Prabhakara’s talk.

Rajeshwari Dutt (DC’06,’12) was recently featured in the Member Spotlight of the American Historical Association (AHA). In the interview, Dutt described her current work on the impact of the Caste War of Mexico on Belize, specifically in race relations at the border of the two regions. “Although Belize has been left out of ‘Latin’ American history there is a real need to address the shared history of Mexico and Belize,” she said. Dutt is an assistant professor at the Indian Institute of Technology, Mandi. Read Dutt’s Member Spotlight.

Alan Eaton (DC’08, HNZ’09) was accepted into the U.S. Foreign Service as a foreign service specialist. He will be heading to Port Louis, Mauritius for his first tour as a general services officer.

Peter Kriss (DC’12), lead research scientist at Medallia, applies research based in behavioral economics to help many of the world's largest companies learn about their customers faster and create better experiences. Learn more

Magdalen Silberman (DC’13) was named the winner of the Humanitas Prize 2017 David and Lynn Angell College Comedy Fellowship for a pilot script she wrote while an MFA student at the University of Texas at Austin. High-profile winners of this year’s Humanitas awards include screenwriters for the popular television series “This is Us” and the feature film “Hidden Figures.” Learn more about the Humanitas awards

Nick Thieme (DC’13) has been awarded the American Statistical Association’s first AAAS Mass Media Science & Engineering Fellowship (MMF). He will spend 10 weeks this summer training as a science journalist with Slate in its D.C. and New York offices. Thieme said, “CMU stats taught me that a statistician is a professional Swiss army knife. Students in the department were approached by, and encouraged to talk to, hiring managers for TV companies, health organizations, dentists, software developers and video game designers. Every company has data needs and there is no reason to limit one’s self to the traditional.” Learn about the media fellowship

Karrie Godwin (DC’15) was recognized as a finalist for the Institute of Education Sciences’ (IES) 2016 Outstanding Predoctoral Fellow Award. Godwin was a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Psychology’s Program in Interdisciplinary Education Research (PIER), which is funded by IES. Her research focused on the relationship between selective sustained attention and learning in young children. “Karrie has what it takes to embark on a successful career as an independent researcher and educator,” said Associate Professor of Psychology Anna Fisher, who nominated Godwin for the award along with David Klahr, the director of PIER.

Dave Haeselin (DC’15) edited “Haunted by Waters,” an anthology written and collected by students from the writing, editing and publishing certificate program in the University of North Dakota’s English department. The anthology explores the Greater Grand Forks area 20 years after the devastating Red River of the North flood of 1997. A graduate of CMU’s Ph.D. program in literary and cultural studies, Haeselin commented, “My faculty advisors (professors Jon Klancher, Kathy Newman and Richard Purcell) facilitated my development of digital humanities and media production skills that were necessary to develop the book and, furthermore, to pass along those skills to my students.”

Maya Schumer (DC’16) has been accepted to the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) highly competitive Graduate Research Fellowship Program. Schumer was one of 2,000 to receive the award from a pool of over 13,000 applicants. She will use the fellowship funding to pursue a Ph.D. in psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA.) There, she will research the use of Multi-Voxel Pattern Analysis (MVPA) to study and decode the neural biomarkers of anxiety and depression. “I’m delighted to see that the NSF recognizes her star potential,” said Associate Professor of Psychology David Creswell, who has worked with Schumer in his Health and Human Performance Laboratory for several years. Read more about the fellowship.

As a Coro fellow, Satvika Neti (DC’16) is learning the ropes of non-profit fundraising, event logistics and consulting at the YWCA Greater Pittsburgh and Homewood Children’s Village. She’s also building her own non-profit organization, WE Education, with Zora Gilbert (DC’16). Read about how Neti is making an impact

David Selverian (DC’17) offered advice to aspiring entrepreneurs in Business Insider. Selverian’s recommendations included knowing the background of an investor before meeting with them and preparing relevant questions in advance. He noted that venture capitalists look for content to support entrepreneurs’ pitches, including financial statements and key performance indicators. Selverian is the co-founder and managing director for Scottie Ventures, which teaches the fundamentals of venture capital. He will begin working with Bessemer Venture Partners this summer. Read Selverian’s tips for aspiring entrepreneurs.

Lisa Murphy (DC’17) has been selected as the Dietrich College’s 2017 recipient of the Gretchen Lankford Prize. The award is named for the late Gretchen Goldsmith Lankford, a 1943 graduate of Margaret Morrison College who received her master’s degree in public management from the Heinz School in 1990. Murphy, a psychology major with a concentration in child development, plans to pursue a master’s degree in special education and teach children between preschool and first grade. She is particularly interested in understanding how children on the autism spectrum learn and develop. Learn how the Lankford Prize will help Murphy reach her goals.

Selected from 768 candidates, Mikaela Wolf-Sorokin (DC’18) is one of 62 recipients of the prestigious 2017 Harry S. Truman Scholarship. The award is designed to support the next generation of public service leaders. Wolf-Sorokin is the sixth overall CMU student to receive this award and the first since 2009. Read more.

History student Stefan Romero (DC’19) won first place in the Medical History category with his paper, "'A New Courage:' World War I and the Art of Facial Reconstruction in Great Britain” at the 2017 Western Pennsylvania Regional Phi Alpha Theta Undergraduate History Conference. This year’s conference was held at Thiel College.

Two Dietrich College juniors are among the 44 CMU students who placed in the top 517 in the Mathematical Association of America’s 77th William Lowell Putnam Competition, the premier mathematics competition for undergraduate students in North America. Ruiyang Lin is an information systems major and Sijie Wei is a computational finance major with an additional major in statistics and machine learning. Learn more about the Putnam Math Competition.

Ania Jaroszewicz placed third in CMU’s Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition with a talk titled, "How the Psychology of Poverty Affects Behavior and Financial Outcomes." Jaroszewicz, who is pursuing a doctoral degree in behavioral decision research in the Dietrich College's Department of Social and Decision Sciences, said 3MT has given her an opportunity to think about how she communicates her work to people who might use it to help shape policy or nonprofit programming. "Poverty is much more complex than many people perceive it to be and consequently, understanding those complexities can improve the effectiveness of welfare programs," she said. Learn more about 3MT.

March 2017

Susan Adams Henderson (DC’89) was nominated for two (more!) Pushcart Prizes, through New World Writing and the Elm Leaves Journal. HarperCollins will publish her next novel, “The Flicker of Old Dreams,” in the spring of 2018. Learn more about Henderson.

As president and CEO of the Asian/Pacific Islander American Chamber of Commerce & Entrepreneurship (ACE), Sach Takayasu (DC’85) played an instrumental role in what she describes as "giving a voice to the business interests of Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI)." Read more

“Analytics: The Agile Way,” the eight book by Phil Simon (DC’94), will be released next year.

Steve Martocci (DC’04), the co-founder and CEO of Splice, has been named to Crain’s New York Business 2017 Class of 40 Under 40.

Lisa Murphy (DC’17) has been selected to receive the 2017 Jostens Trophy as the top Division III women’s basketball player on and off the court. Learn more

History Department graduate student Lauren Churilla is also a full-time curator at St. Vincent College's Foster and Muriel McCarl Coverlet Gallery. She currently pursues a research interest in women empowerment and self-defense tactics from 1880-1930. Learn more about how she’s moving women’s history forward

Avery J. Wiscomb, an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in the Digital Humanities and a Ph.D. student in literary and cultural studies, wrote an op-ed for the Chronicle of Higher Education on "Hyperserfs: How Silicon Valley exploits students and their universities." Read the piece.

February 2017

One thing Dietrich College alumni know for certain is that their education prepares them for almost anything. Meg Brindle  (DC’92), who received a Ph.D. in applied history, left a tenured position at George Mason University to Africa to explore and address root causes of poverty rather than just the symptoms. Learn more

Vishwas Prabhakara (DC’02) will return to campus March 30 for a talk on “What They Don’t Want You To Know.” Prabhakara’s lecture is part of the Dietrich College Entrepreneurship Series and co-sponsored by the Swartz Center for Entrepreneurship. Learn more.

Emily Duff Bartel (DC’06), who is based in Pittsburgh, is a product manager for Uber’s Advanced Technology Group (ATG), the research and development hub of Uber’s engineering team. ATG is dedicated to self-driving technologies, mapping and vehicle safety, and is at the forefront of the company’s pilot program that is testing self-driving cars. Learn more.

Faryal Khan (DC'09) is a transcreation director at World Writers – part of Williams Lea Tag, a large marketing and communications agency in New York City.  She credits her success to saying “yes” to opportunities as they arose and following her interests, even when they diverged from her past experiences. Read more about how she uses her history degree.

Senior Sarah Gutekunst is taking everyone behind the scenes of her final semester on social media. Learn more and follow along.

January 2017

Maureen Rolla (DC'75) and Peggy Doyle (DC'84) share their paths to successful and fullfilling careers in Using an English Degree To Do What You Love.

Beth Geisler (DC'92), who received a M.A. in Professional Writing, recently presented from her book "100 Things to Do in Pittsburgh Before You Die."

Gretchen Wyatt (DC’93) recently joined Cohen & Company as a director in its tax department. A certified public accountant with more than 18 years of experience, she is a member of the American Institute of CPAs and Pennsylvania Society of CPAs.

Included among the 2017 CMU Alumni Award recipients are two Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences alumni. Sachiko Takayasu (DC'85), president and CEO of Asian/Pacific Islander American Chamber of Commerce and Entrepreneurship (ACE), will receive an Alumni Achievement Award for accomplishments in her professional field. An Alumni Service Award will be given to Ruth Osborne Rouleau (DC'52, '53). Read more.

Lisa Murphy (DC'17), a psychology major and member of the CMU Women's Basketball team, recorded 2,000 points and 1,000 rebounds. Murphy is the first player in UAA history and 18th player in NCAA Division III history to achive this.

November/December 2016

Michael Snizek (DC’78) is a product manager at Fiserv in Warren, NJ, specializing in reporting and data products.

This year, Kurt M. Saunders (DC’82) published a textbook titled “Intellectual Property Law: Legal Aspects of Innovation and Competition” (West Academic). The book provides comprehensive coverage of trade secrets, patents, copyrights, trademarks and other intellectual property issues. Saunders is a professor of business law at California State University.

Jeremy Toeman (DC’96) sold his last three startups and in June 2015 became the vice president of product and audience engagement at CNET.com, the world’s largest tech news site.

Norman Bier (DC’99) recently gave two talks at the Open Education Conference: "The Open Learning Initiative at 15: Successes, Lessons Learned and the Road Ahead for OLI" and "FutuOER: Designing the Next Generation of Open Education.” Bier is currently the director of OLI and the executive director of the Simon Initiative at CMU. Learn more about #OpenEd16.

Zack Hiwiller (DC’05) is a chair in the Game Design Department at Full Sail University in Winter Park, FL. His book about game design, “Players Making Decisions,” was published by New Riders in 2015.

Twenty years after she won a contest to name the iconic tree that is decorated each year for Pittsburgh’s Light-Up Night, Alexandra Cole (DC’09) reflected on its significance in the Tribune-Review. A recent story on Light-Up Night that referenced the name—Unity Tree—stirred up controversy on social media, where commenters argued that it should simply be called a Christmas tree. “I am so happy they haven’t renamed it,” said Cole (nee Kronstein), who named the tree when she was nine years old. “The concept is still very important, maybe even more now than it was 20 years ago. The concept was never meant as an attack on Christmas.” Read the full story.

Arvind Pendurthi (DC’17) was featured in a recent Pittsburgh Post-Gazette story about Steelers’ coach Mike Tomlin’s penchant for two-point conversations. Pendurthi was among several sports analysts who shared their opinions on the coach’s strategy. A senior majoring in decision science, Pendurthi is the president and co-founder of Tartan Sports Analytics Club. Read “The sports analytics community has Mike Tomlin’s back.”

Two undergraduate students in the Dietrich College have received scholarships from the Jennings Family Brave Companions Fund. The fund, founded by CMU Board of Trustees member Larry Jennings, supports summer research for underrepresented CMU students. Winning the scholarship gave Kaoon Ban (DC’17) her first chance to travel to Costa Rica, where she began exploring ideas for her honors thesis. Amanda Thiele (DC’18) used the scholarship to support a trip to Ghana where she shadowed professionals at a local hospital. Learn more. 

The University of Cambridge has accepted Pierce Williams, a Ph.D. student in literary and cultural studies, as a visiting scholar for the fall 2017 semester. There, he will research and write his dissertation on the ways that scientific texts shaped the cultural impact of science in the 18th century. “I’m working with cultural theory, book history, performance studies and digital humanities methods to think about science as public culture during the Enlightenment,” said Williams, a 2016 A.W. Mellon Fellow in digital humanities. Read a Q&A with Williams about Cambridge’s visiting scholars program.

Emmett Eldred (DC’17) won this year’s Alan and Gloria Siegel Award for Professional Writing with a piece on Siddhartha Srinivasa’s “Formalizing Human-Robot Mutual Adaptation via a Bounded Memory Based Model.” Eldred, who is double majoring in creative and professional writing, said, “I was pretty surprised to learn that I won first prize. I know most of the other finalists and I can personally vouch that they are all excellent writers.” The award was established by former CMU adjunct professor Alan Siegel, who currently runs the brand identity consultancy Siegelvision. See the full list of 2016 winners.

October 2016

Perry Bush (DC’87,’90) spoke on the topic of American Mennonites and the common good in a series of three lectures at Bethel College in North Newton, Kansas from October 30-31. As a Ph.D. student at CMU, Bush explored how the central Mennonite tenet of pacifism manifested in twentieth-century America. His research was published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 1988 as “Two Kingdoms, Two Loyalties: Mennonite Pacifism in Modern America.” He is a professor of history at Bluffton University in Bluffton, Ohio. Read more about Bush’s lectures.

Luke Brindle-Khym (DC’01) has turned his passion for truth and justice into a successful career as a private investigator. In 2010 Brindle-Khym launched Quest Research & Investigations LLC (QRI), a firm that collects evidence for civil and criminal litigators and investigates corporate misconduct. He said that his education prepared him for investigative work by teaching him how to critically analyze texts – from great works of literature to financial statements and SEC filings. “A Dietrich College education empowers you to ask difficult, fundamental questions and to refine and sharpen those questions as you quest closer to the truth,” said Brindle-Khym, who earned his bachelor of arts degree in social history and also majored in English. Learn about Brindle-Khym’s career path.

As the all-time leading scorer for CMU’s women’s basketball team, Lisa Murphy (DC’17) is the team’s most accomplished player in CMU history. But her work off the court is grabbing attention as well. Murphy—an Andrew Carnegie Society Scholar and a member of the Mortar Board and Psi Chi honors societies—actively pursues internships, volunteer activities and community service opportunities that enhance her major in psychology. She hopes to combine these experiences in a career as a special education teacher. Read about Murphy’s impact on and off the basketball court.

Eight Dietrich College seniors have been named 2017 Andrew Carnegie Society (ACS) Scholars - CMU undergraduate students who combine high academic standards with extracurricular activities, including volunteering in the community, playing sports and participating in student organizations. The ACS Scholars are Emmett Eldred (DC’17), Emily Helfer (DC’17), Emily Joyce (DC’17), Dhruva Krishna (DC’17), Lisa Murphy (DC’17), Alexandra Pasch (DC’17), Gujri Singh (DC’17) and Rob Stephens (DC’17). Read more.

The 11 Dietrich College Honors Fellows have been blogging about the progress of their senior honors theses, tackling everything from balancing research and writing with their coursework to awaiting approval from institutional review boards (IRB). Read the latest on the Dietrich Honors Research Fellowship blog

Meghana Valluri (DC’18), Annette Chen (DC’18) and Emily Su (DC’18) won first place in the data visualization category of Boeing’s UpLift IT Case Competition with SecurityPulse, a web-based dashboard system that monitors security threats in airplanes. The application differs from existing security management tools in that it displays a holistic overview of current threats, rather than snapshots of individual issues. The team received a $1,500 grant to share, and they’ve been invited to Seattle to tour the Boeing Everett Factory and meet key leaders in the IT department. Valluri, Chen and Su are juniors majoring in information systems. Learn more.

Casey Roark, a graduate student in the Department of Psychology and the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CBNC), recently participated in the Listening Into 2030 workshop in Berkeley, Calif. Roark was one of only eight early career researchers invited to participate in the event, where she helped create a “roadmap” for developing new technologies in speech communication and the hearing sciences. “It feels amazing to have been given this opportunity and to have my voice counted among these senior researchers,” she said. Learn more about Roark’s research and the Listening Into 2030 workshop.

Seven Dietrich College Ph.D. students have been selected as Andrew W. Mellon Fellows for 2017. The fellows are David Busch (History Department), Qiong Li (Modern Languages Department), Tianyu (Sophie) Qin (Modern Languages Department), Connor Robinson-Arnull (Philosophy Department), Aurora Tsai (Modern Languages Department), Patrick Walsh (Philosophy Department) and Avery Wiscomb (English Department). Learn more about the fellows and their work in digital humanities and technology-enhanced learning (TEL).

September 2016

Award-winning storyteller, actor, writer and educator Regina Ress (DC’64) has been traveling throughout the country to perform “Compassion, Generosity and Grace: Stories from 9/11,” which weaves together poignant and humorous stories about that tragic day. Throughout her career, Ress has performed folk tales and personal stories in English and Spanish, everywhere from homeless shelters to the White House. “I like to address tough issues through storytelling because you’re not lecturing,” said Ress. “You can talk about what’s going on in the world indirectly through these incredible, moving stories.” Learn more about “Compassion, Generosity and Grace.”

Amer Yaqub (DC’89) has been named managing director of Global Trade Magazine, where he will build the publication’s international business. Yaqub also recently began teaching a marketing research course at Hood College in Frederick, Maryland.

Vivienne Ming (DC’03,’06) was featured in the Atlantic’s article on accomplished trans women and their thoughts on power and leadership in the office. Read “At Work in Two Genders.”

Carnegie Mellon University students Alyssa Aburachis (DC’18) and Cristina Molina (DC’17) have received the 2016 Ireland Undergraduate Research Awards. Aburachis, a science and humanities scholar who is majoring in neurobiology and psychology, is working in Erik Thiessen’s Infant Language and Learning Lab to investigate the effect of being raised in a bilingual environment on children’s attention spans. A senior psychology major, Molina is working with Associate Professor of Psychology David Rakison to conduct one of the first empirical research studies into the popular belief that biracial individuals are considered to be more attractive than those of a single race. Funded by an endowment from the George and Elisabeth Ireland family, the awards were established in 2015 to support high-quality undergraduate psychology research projects. Learn more.

August 2016

Michael Croland (DC’05) released his first book, “Oy Oy Oy Gevalt! Jews and Punk.” The academic book examines how Jews related to their Jewishness through the vehicle of punk music—from prominent figures in the history of punk to musicians who proudly display their Jewish identity. Learn more about “Oy Oy Oy Gevalt!”

Maybe Jairan Sedeghi (BHA'05) and Jacqueline Barnes (BHA'16) are among six women artists from the Pittsburgh region who are putting the 1920s Magical Realism art movement into a contemporary context. Using a variety of mediums, the artists explore the fantastic, surreal, sci-fi and utopian–inspired tales through the lens of feminism, eco-feminism, black feminism, queer feminism and post-capitalist feminism. Find out more about Re-Imagining Magical Realism at Framehouse & Jask Gallery.

Nick Ryan (DC’11) is taking the humble pogo stick to new heights with his company, Xpogo, which he founded as a rising junior at CMU. Today, as the company’s CEO, he works tirelessly to transform the perception of pogo from a toy to a sports lifestyle through events like Pogopalooza, which was held this summer at Pittsburgh’s Carrie Furnaces. Learn about Ryan’s plans for Xpogo and watch a video featuring extreme pogo moves.

In an essay for the Ford Foundation, Victor Tavarez (DC’18) described how internships—like his at the Ford Foundation—create more opportunities for success. In “Getting unstuck: Why internships matter,” Tavarez described how early opportunities led him to his current role. Through SEO, an educational nonprofit that helps low-income students prepare for college, he “learned how to tie a tie, while my childhood and high school friends learned to roll a blunt.” Read “Getting unstuck.”

Freshman Maury Jackson (DC’20) recently wrote “Black Female Athletes Entering a Golden Era” for The African-American Athlete. In the piece, Jackson cites the examples of gymnast Simone Biles and swimmer Simone Manuel, both of whom won gold medals at the 2016 Olympics in Rio. Read Jackson’s essay.

July 2016

The American Philosophical Association recently featured Conor Mayo-Wilson (DC’09, ’12, MCS ’10) on its blog. In an Early Career Research Spotlight interview, Mayo-Wilson describes how his work draws from epistemology, philosophy of science and mathematical philosophy. Read the full interview.

Lizzie Silver (DC’13) co-wrote a post for CMU’s Students for Urban Data Systems blog exploring the overlapping police departments of Allegheny County. In the post, Silver and co-author Lauren Renaud argue that police departments with overlapping jurisdictions must coordinate with each other to ensure that their interactions with the public are standardized. Read the post.

Alex Reinhart (DC’14) has been selected to receive a Graduate Research Fellowship in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics from the National Institute of Justice. The funding will support Reinhart’s statistics project, “Point process modeling with spatiotemporal covariates for predicting crime.” Learn more about the fellowship program.

With a grant from Awesome Pittsburgh, Judd Poeske (BHA’14) developed Street Side Karaoke as a family-friendly alternative to the karaoke bar. “I wanted it to be out in the open,” he told Pittsburgh City Paper. “Everybody has favorite songs that they like to sing and know the words to by heart. Why not try to give that to people?” Read more.

June 2016

Kelly Culmer (DC’85) was recently elected to the Board of Trustees of the Association for a Buffalo Presidential Center and to the office of Secretary on its board. The ABPC is working to create a museum dedicated to Millard Fillmore and Grover Cleveland, the two U.S. Presidents from Buffalo, and other western New Yorkers who have held prominent places in national politics.

Along with David Sharpe, Deb Helfrich (DC’91) is a founder of Out Thinking Parkinson’s, an online resource for individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Sharpe and Helfrich have developed methods for movement recovery and other ways to improve quality of life with the disease. Helfrich is a wellness mentor, career and development expert and author. Sharpe is a U.K.-based digital marketing expert living with the disease. Read a profile of Helfrich and Sharpe on Forbes.

Since its inception in 2001, the Sprout Fund has supported the work of Pittsburgh nonprofits. The foundation’s co-founder, president and CEO Cathy Lewis Long (DC’91) and program officer Ryan Coon (DC’06) regularly draw from the storytelling skills they developed as students in CMU’s English Department. Read “Alumni Make Pittsburgh a Better Place Through the Sprout Fund.”

Anne Ray (DC’00) won the 10th annual Danahy Fiction Prize for her short story, “Please Repeat My Name.” She will receive a $1,000 award, and the story will be published in the “Tampa Review.” Read more about Ray and the prize.

Vivienne Ming (DC’03,’06) is the co-creator of Muse, an app that uses artificial intelligence to deliver daily questions, brief activities and conversation starters for parents and children. Ming is a neuroscientist and technology entrepreneur who received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in psychology from CMU. Read more about Muse and other apps highlighted by NPR

Chloe Fraboni (DC’11) was recently promoted to an editor position at Simon & Schuster, home to acclaimed novelists including Stephen King and Jennifer Weiner. Fraboni previously launched two children’s book series at the publisher. Read a profile of Fraboni.

Nathan Doherty (DC'15) published an article in the leading interdisiciplinary law journal, Law and Literature. In it, he focuses on the fantasy novel, “The Scar,” by contemporary Marxist theorist and writer China Miéville in an attempt to bring Miéville into a conversation with neo-liberal legal theorists. Read the article.

Blake Chasen (DC’16) recently returned from a trip with CMU’s Project Rwanda. While there, he taught fourth and fifth graders how to use laptops and participated in arts and culture workshops based on storytelling. Read more about Chasen’s trip.

Fifteen student-athletes in the Dietrich College received perfect GPAs in the spring 2016 semester: Edward Ang – Men’s Tennis (DC’17); Greg Bellwoar – Men’s Soccer (DC’18); Kiersten Chuc – Women’s Track and Field (DC’17); Stefan Dasbach – Men’s Soccer (DC’16); Anthony Gulli – Men’s Soccer (DC’18); Tori Iatarola – Women’s Soccer (DC’17); Bryan Jangro – Football (DC’17); Hera Miao – Women’s Swimming and Diving (DC’18); Lisa Murphy – Women’s Basketball (DC’17); Matt Nielsen – Men’s Swimming and Diving (DC’16); Carson Quiros – Women’s Soccer (DC’16); Yuvraj Shiv Kumar – Men’s Tennis (DC’16); Cori Sidell – Women’s Tennis (DC’17); Grant Wilmer – Women’s Soccer (DC’17); Brady Wilson – Men’s Track and Field (DC’17). Read “Athletes Rally, Shoot to Head of the Class.”

Literary and Cultural Studies doctoral student Avery Wiscomb authored an article for Jacobin titled “The Entrepreneurship Racket.” In the essay, Wiscomb notes that enthusiasm for entrepreneurship continues to grow, despite the number of new business start-ups in the U.S. having steadily declined over the last 30 years. Read Wiscomb’s essay.

May 2016

Phil Simon (DC'94) will be joining the faculty at Arizona State University's Carey School of Business in the fall of 2016.

Abby (Schiff) Klemmer
(DC '95) published her first novel this spring. Written under the pseudonym Abby Vegas, “Clean Break” is a chick-lit/romantic suspense crossover. Learn more about the book.

Sarah Pressman (DC’02,’06) is garnering worldwide attention with her groundbreaking studies on the connection between happiness and health. Pressman, an associate professor of psychology and social behavior at U.C. Irvine, was recently featured in the Los Angeles Times. In “Research backs relationship between health, happiness,” Pressman states that happiness should be considered in all standard medical evaluations. She believes that doctors should be trained to question their patients about their emotional wellbeing and to find ways to intervene if necessary. “Happiness matters a great deal to your health,” said Pressman. “That’s not just wishful thinking. It’s science.” Read “Research backs relationship between health, happiness.”

Jackie Sizemore (DC’10) recently graduated from Boise State University with an MFA in creative writing focusing on fiction. Her thesis was a feminist novel-in-progress set in the near future. Sizemore double majored in creative writing and history at Carnegie Mellon.

Cassie Patricia Miller (DC'11), a doctoral student in the History Department, has been selected as a Mellon/American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Public Fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center as a Research and Investigation Specialist. Miller will relocate to Montgomery, Alabama for the two-year fellowship, which begins in September. Learn more about the ACLS program.

Courtney Wittekind (BXA'13) has received one of 2,000 fellowships through the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program. The $138,000 award will support Wittekind's doctoral studies in social anthropology at Harvard University, which she will begin this fall. Wittekind, who also received a Rhodes Scholarship in 2013, was selected from a pool of close to 17,000 applicants from diverse scientific disciplines. The fellowship is rarely awarded in the social sciences, according to Judith Schachter, who advised Wittekind as an undergraduate student. "Throughout her undergraduate and master's level work, Courtney has been committed to stretching the principles and methods of cultural anthropology," said Schachter, professor of anthropology and history. Learn more.

Autopods is expanding outside of Pittsburgh for the first time. Tanuj Apte (DC’14) and his business partner, fellow CMU graduate Deepak Vidhani, recently introduced the three-wheeled pedicabs in Charleston, WV. “We believe this city [Charleston] is a perfect fit for microtaxis,” said Apte, who received a B.S. degree in information systems. Read “Pittsburgh pedicab company expands to WV capital.”

Kurt Sampsel (DC’15), a graduate of the English Department’s Ph.D. program in Literary and Cultural Studies (LCS) and Matthew Zebrowski (DC’15), a graduate of the department’s Rhetoric Ph.D. program, were recently featured in an article highlighting their careers in the nonprofit sector. Sampsel works as the government services associate at the Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) in Chicago, where he helps local election authorities use technology to better serve constituents. Zebrowski is the development communications manager at State Voices, a nonpartisan organization that focuses on civic engagement. Both regularly draw from the writing and research experience they developed at CMU in these roles. “I like the kind of person that I am as a result of my Ph.D. It made me smarter, but also more patient, open minded, empathetic and politically engaged,” said Sampsel. Read the full profile.

Carnegie Mellon University Athletics Department hosted its annual awards banquet in April. More than 300 student-athletes attended the event honoring athletic and academic achievement. Men’s basketball player Blake Chasen (TPR’16), a double major in business administration and creative writing, was the inaugural recipient of the Michael C. Murphy Citizenship Award. This new award will be presented annually to seniors who have demonstrated character, sportsmanship, service and impact on CMU. Creative writing and professional writing major Carson Quiros (DC’16) was a recipient of the seventh annual Dr. William Brown Academic Achievement Award. Quiros, a women’s soccer athlete, carries a 3.87 GPA. Learn about the awards banquet.

Cristina Martin Ristori (DC’16) wrote an article that recently appeared in the journal “Al-Noor.” Ristori majored in global studies and international relations and politics, with a concentration in Middle Eastern and Arabic Studies. This summer, she will intern at the Iraq Project at the Institute for the Study of War in Washington, D.C.; after that she will intern at the Center for Strategic Studies at the University of Jordan in Amman. Read “The 1973 ‘Oil Weapon’: Turning a Regional Conflict Into a Global Crisis.”

Sangwon (Justin) Huang, a Ph.D. candidate in the Statistics Department, won first prize in the Technology, Engineering and Math category of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 2016 Student Poster Competition. The poster contest was part of the AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.in February. Learn more about Hyun’s entry, “Epidemiological Forecasting with Statistical Models.”

April 2016

Patrick Cavanagh (DC’72), head of the Centre of Attention and Vision and the Université Paris Descartes and a distinguished research professor at Dartmouth College, will present “The Artist as Neuroscientist” on May 14 at the Museum of Fine Arts in Pete Beach, FL. During the lecture, Cavanagh will survey art from cave paintings to contemporary works and demonstrate “science by looking.” The talk is open to the public and included in the price of museum admission. It is part of the Vision Sciences Society’s 16th annual meeting from May 13-18. Learn more about Cavanagh’s lecture.

A readability analysis of presidential candidate speeches by researchers at Carnegie Mellon’s Language Technologies Institute (LTI) found that most candidates use words and grammar typical of students in grades 6-8, with Donald Trump speaking at the lowest grade level of the candidates. Maxine Eskenazi (DC’73), LTI principal systems scientist, performed the analysis with Elliot Schumacher, a graduate student in language technologies. “Assessing the readability of campaign speeches in a little tricky because most measures are geared to the written word, yet text is very different from the spoken word,” said Eskenazi. “When we speak, we usually use less structured language with shorter sentences.” Learn more about the study.

Susan Klein (DC’76) is head of marketing and communications for the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park and the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park. She leads the design, advertising, digital, content management, PR and social media teams for both museums. Together, these teams build new audiences, deepen engagement, grow revenue and, through innovative technology, expand the influence of art beyond the physical walls of the museum. Learn about the museums.

Edward (Ted) Gibson (DC’91), professor of cognitive science at MIT, studies the relationship between culture and cognition, why human languages look the way they do and how people learn and process language. Gibson is currently assembling a corpus of texts from non-industrialized cultures, including the Pirahã and Tsimane’ of the Amazon. His work with the Pirahã was recently featured in “Nature’s Numbers,” a BBC Discovery documentary series that examines the origins of mathematical understanding in humans. Read more about Gibson’s research.

As part of CMU’s DNA Day celebration on April 25, Norman Bier (DC’99) contributed to a video highlighting the role of the Simon Initiative, which he directs, as part of CMU’s “institutional DNA.” Watch the video.

The Santa Barbara County Arts Commission recently named Sarah York Rubin (DC’07) as its executive director. In this role, Rubin will work with other members of the commission to make art more accessible to diverse residents across Santa Barbara County. A graduate of the English Department’s Master of Arts in Rhetoric program, Rubin previously served as executive director of Pittsburgh’s Hillman Center for Performing Arts at Shady Side Academy. Read a profile of Rubin.

Siriana Abboud (DC’16) has been selected as the Dietrich College’s 2016 recipient of the Gretchen Lankford Prize. The prize is named for the late Gretchen Goldsmith Lankford, a 1943 graduate of Margaret Morrison College who received her master’s degree in public management from the Heinz School in 1990. Abboud, a psychology major with an additional major in French and Francophone Studies, describes her educational philosophy with a Haitian proverb: “Tout moun se moun,” which translates to “All people are people.” She said, “As a teacher, I cannot assume that I can completely change the lives of the students I will teach. Rather, they will influence me as I influence them.” Learn about how Abboud’s values impact her teaching.

In celebration of DNA Day on April 25, three undergraduate students from the Dietrich College answered the question: “What’s in your DNA?” in a video shared by the college. 2015-16 Dietrich Honors Fellow Laurnie Wilson (DC’16) and 2016-17 Honors Fellows Mary Catherine (Casey) Devine (DC’17) and Sophia Makal (DC’17) all appear in the video. Watch it here.

Tess Harty (DC’17) has been accepted to the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Linguistics Field School, which runs for five weeks in May and June, 2016. Harty is part of a cohort of 12 undergraduate students who demonstrate a strong interest in and commitment to linguistics, digital tools and related field. After 10 days of intensive training in linguistic field methods, data analysis and digital recording at Haverford College, students will join local community revitalization projects in Oaxaca, Mexico and the Navajo Nation. She will be working at the Oaxaca site to work in the field and to help develop a dictionary smartphone app. Learn more about REU Linguistics Field School.

This year’s co-winners of the Dietrich College Graduate Student Teaching Award are Ana Cooke and Sihui (Echo) Ke. A Ph.D. candidate in rhetoric within the Department of English, Cooke describes her teaching style as “student-centered and collaborative.” She said, “I think learning occurs best when students are actively engaged in discussing, sharing, and interacting, both with me and with one another. It fosters relationships, and ideally creates an environment in which students have more agency and empowerment in their learning.” As a Ph.D. candidate in second language acquisition in the Modern Languages Department, Ke also works to help her students communicate through her teaching. She is interested in innovative foreign language and culture courses that promote co-teaching, technology-enhanced learning and joint contributions from faculty and students. “My happiest moments have been when I realize how much I have learned from my students, and the role I have played in helping them to become autonomous life-long learners in their own journeys,” said Ke. Learn more about Cooke and Ke.

Ph.D. student Ania Jaroszewicz has received one of 30 Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans this year. Chosen from 1,443 applicants, Jaroszewicz was selected for her potential to make significant contributions to U.S. society, culture and academics. She is pursuing a doctoral degree in behavioral decision research in the Department of Social and Decision Sciences. The Soros Fellowships for New Americans, considered a premier graduate school fellowship for immigrants and children of immigrants, provides fellows with up to $90,000 for graduate education. Jaroszewicz was born in California and is the daughter of Polish immigrants. In 2014, Jaroszewicz came to CMU, where she hopes to combine behavioral decision research with her experiences to help combat poverty. In particular, her goal is to use behavioral economics to design psychologically informed poverty-alleviation and consumer protection policies. Find out more.

Juliann Reineke placed second in Carnegie Mellon’s annual Three Minute Thesis Championship (3MT®), where she presented “Three Sheets to the Wind: The Jolly Jack Tar and 18th-Century British Masculinity.” A Ph.D. candidate in literary and cultural studies, Reineke summarized her thesis using a single PowerPoint slide. To prepare, she sought free communications consulting from CMU’s Global Communication Center (GCC). GCC Director Joanna Wolfe said that Reineke’s presentation was flawless. “She did a great job taking something that could be perceived as obscure and made it come alive,” said Wolfe, who is also a teaching professor in the Department of English. Reineke received a $2,000 travel grant that will fund archival research at the Smithsonian or Britain’s National Maritime Museum. Find out more about the 3MT® competition.

March 2016

After spending the past few years working on automation systems for the midstream oil and gas market, Jack Benjamin (DC’75) has accepted a position as a valve technical specialist for Automated Valve & Equipment headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio.

John Parras (DC’86) received an Individual Artist Fellowship Award from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. The award, given in the category of prose writing, is accompanied by an honorarium of $8,000. NJSCA individual fellowship awards are given in twelve different arts disciplines and awarded solely on independent peer panel assessment of work samples submitted. The program is administered in partnership with the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation.

Beth Geisler (DC’92) recently released “100 Things to Do in Pittsburgh Before You Die.” In the book, Geisler, who received a master of arts degree in professional writing, takes an in-depth look at Pittsburgh’s arts and cultural institutions, recreational activities, architecture and green spaces. The book also highlights the city’s industrial history, emerging tech industry and its role in the sustainability movement. Geisler’s book is available on Amazon. Learn more.

Kayt Sukel (DC’95) explores risk-taking and its impact on decision-making in her new book, “The Art of Risk: The New Science of Courage, Caution & Chance.” By blending science and real case studies, Sukel provides insight in understanding individual behavior and furthering personal success. Sukel, who majored in cognitive psychology, is a passionate traveler and science writer. Her work has appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, the New Scientist, USA Today, The Washington Post, ISLANDS, Parenting, the Bark, American Baby and the AARP Bulletin. She is a partner at the award-winning family travel website Travel Savvy Mom and is also a frequent contributor to the Dana Foundation's many science publications. Read a Dietrich College News Q&A with Sukel.

Rachel Delphia (DC’03), the Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman curator of decorative arts and design at the Carnegie Museum of Art, co-organized the exhibit “Silver to Steel: The Modern Design of Peter Muller-Munk.” In the months leading up to opening night, her position centered on the design and installation of the exhibit, which highlights industrial design of the mid-twentieth century and its ties to Pittsburgh. Delphia discovered museum work as a student in the English Department’s Master of Arts in Literary and Cultural Studies (LCS) program. Another LCS graduate, Matt Ewalt (DC’02,’03) is now the associate director of education and youth services at the Chautauqua Institution. In addition to educational programming, the organization offers a host of programs related to the arts, religion and recreation. Previously, Ewalt had worked in journalism, as the editor of The Chautauquan Daily. He was introduced to the field as an undergraduate student in the professional writing program; after seeing Professor Kathy Newman’s writing regularly appear in the Pittsburgh City Paper, he realized that journalism can be informed by an in-depth understanding of cultural studies. Read more about Delphia and Ewalt.

Emily Kennedy (DC’12) delivered the keynote address and appeared on a panel at an event called “How Meaningful Transformation Happens,” part of the Government Transformation 2016 conference in Sacramento. Kennedy, who majored in ethics, history and public policy, presented a case study of human trafficking. She is the founder and CEO of Marinus Analytics, a human trafficking data analytics software tool that she developed as a student at Carnegie Mellon. Watch a video from the conference.

Sheila Liming (DC’14), who received a Ph.D. in literary and cultural studies, authored an essay titled, "The Puerility of ‘Purity’: How Franzen’s Latest Novel Rewrites an Edith Wharton Novel You’ve Probably Never Heard Of” that appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books. In the essay, Liming draws parallels between Jonathan Franzen’s novel “Purity” and Edith Wharton’s “The Children,” published in 1928. According to Liming, the common threads between the two works are particularly interesting given Franzen’s public disdain for Wharton’s fiction. An assistant professor of English at the University of North Dakota, Liming is currently writing a book about Wharton, bibliomania and early 20th century cultures of collecting. Read Liming’s essay.

Kaytie Nielsen (DC'16) has won a nationally competitive fellowship from the Henry Luce Foundation. A Bachelor of Humanities and Arts (BHA) student with concentrations in creative writing and directing, Nielsen is one of 18 students and young professionals selected to participate in the prestigious Luce Scholars Program. The award provides stipends, language training and individualized professional placement in Asia for individuals from various fields and backgrounds who have limited exposure to Asian culture. "Kaytie is an adventurer, an intellectual seeker and a relationship builder. At every turn, she has sought out unique experiences and personal connections to make her a better, more skillful and deeply thoughtful documentary filmmaker," said Stephanie Wallach, assistant vice provost for undergraduate education. "The Luce Scholars Program allows Kaytie to use these very same qualities in Asia as she sets out on her post-graduate journey that will reshape her personal narrative and her professional contributions in the future." Nielsen is determining the country and type of organization that best suits her goals and talents. She hopes to work hands-on with filmmakers who promote social change through their craft, or as part of an educational initiative that makes filmmaking more accessible to underprivileged populations. Find out more.

Melanie Diaz (DC'17), an English and global studies major, has been awarded a Public Policy & International Affairs (PPIA) fellowship for 2016. The fellowship program is designed to help students from diverse backgrounds attend graduate school, typically in the areas of public policy, public administration, international affairs and related fields. As part of the fellowship, Diaz will attend an intensive, seven-week Junior Summer Institute (JSI) at the Heinz College this June. The institutes provide students with the knowledge and skills they will need to succeed while pursuing a master’s degree and working to serve the public good. “What makes Melanie such a great candidate for the PPIA is that she has the heart and the head to make a difference in education,” said Stephanie Wallach, assistant vice provost for undergraduate education. Find out more.

Anne-Sophie Kim (DC'17) will begin an internship with Apple, Inc. in late May. Kim, who is majoring in English and human-computer interaction, will be creating UI copy and documentation as part of the iTunes web interface team. Last summer, Kim was a production and design intern for Yale University Press. Previously, she worked as a contributing writer for USA Today College. Kim has also worked for The Tartan as layout manager and is currently a contributing editor. She applied for the Apple internship because it links her two majors. She said, “I wanted to work somewhere with big impact but personal meaning.”

Ian Asenjo (DC'18) has received a Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) from the U.S. Department of State. Over the past 10 years, the fully funded overseas cultural immersion program has sent over 5,000 American undergraduate and graduate students around the world to learn 14 critical languages. Critical languages, including Arabic, Chinese and Punjabi, can be difficult to learn because they are radically different from English in grammatical structure and other features. As a result, the demand for proficiency in these languages outpaces the supply of fluent speakers. A global studies major with an additional major in ethics, history and public policy, Asenjo was drawn to the CLS program because of its strong reputation for intensive language learning. He will be traveling to Chandigarh, India, this summer, where he hopes to gain proficiency in Punjabi and explore his passion for Bhangra — a folk dance with roots in the region. According to Joanna Dickert, assistant director of undergraduate research and national fellowships, Asenjo is an ideal match for the CLS program. “With a lifelong commitment to intercultural engagement and language learning, he has used these values as a foundation for his academic career at Carnegie Mellon,” Dickert said. “A true seeker, he embodies the intellectual curiosity that we aim to cultivate in our students.” Learn more.

Ruoshu (Rosa) Liu (DC'18) and Cameron Dively (DC'18) have received scholarships to participate in the Fulton and Gow Fellows Programs in Washington, D.C. Through the 10-week summer program, Liu, an economics major, and Dively, an ethics, history and public policy major, will receive fully paid housing and internships in Washington. Established in 1972, the fellowship provides internships in the legislative branches of government for students from Allegheny County and surrounding counties. Learn more about the program.

Maria Cuellar, a doctoral student in statistics and public policy, contributed to an op-ed that recently appeared in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. In “The Next Page: Four experts explain why forensic analysis of crime scenes is not as reliable as you might think,” Cuellar and her co-authors argue that many forensic science methods are not sufficiently tested. The authors cite examples from the case of Steven Avery, the subject of the Netflix documentary series “Making a Murderer.” According to the authors, “When the liberty of a human being is on the line, the scientific evidence on which we rely must be as valid and unbiased as possible.” Read the op-ed.

Two Ph.D. students in statistics, Shannon Gallagher and Lee Richardson, finished first place in the MIDAS MISSION Public Health Hackathon. The purpose of the competition was for teams to develop visualization software to improve public health. In their research, both Gallagher and Richardson focus on modeling the spread of infectious diseases worldwide. For the competition, they developed interactive visualization tools to show disease incidence in specific U.S. regions. The team—the only statisticians who participated in the competition—also developed a data download tool to allow other researchers to explore the data. View the team’s submission.

February 2016

Elizabeth Harris (DC’65) has released her second book to critical acclaim. “Mayhem: Three Lives of a Woman” (2015), which won the 2014 Gival Press Novel Award, has been called "a sophisticated act of sisterhood” and compared to the fiction of Anne Porter, Wendell Berry, Cormac McCarthy,and Annie Proulx. Her first book — a collection of short stories, “The Ant Generator” — was published in 1991. Harris taught fiction writing and modern literature for a number of years at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more.

With his wife Marchell, David Hilliard (DC'73) hosted Dietrich College Dean Richard Scheines, Professors Timothy Verstynen and Kevin Zollman and other alumni for a networking brunch in Los Angeles. View photos from the alumni brunch.

Emily Dobler (DC’13) has been hired as a copy editor at PoliticoPro, a subscription-based offshoot of the popular politics website Politico. Dobler majored in professional writing and English at Carnegie Mellon, where she served as editor of The Tartan. She previously worked for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette as a copy editor and page designer. Read a recent profile of Dobler

Rhetoric Ph.D. student Justin Mando’s first single-authored article is featured in a special edition of “Environmental Communication,” the official peer-reviewed journal of the International Environmental Communication Association. Mando’s article, “Constructing the vicarious experience of proximity in a Marcellus Shale public hearing,” examines citizen testimony in a public hearing and explains how the description of places functions as an argumentative resource. “It feels great to make a contribution on this issue,” he said. “I’ve been working on this for quite a while.” Read Mando’s article.


Elizabeth Agyemang (DC’17), a junior double majoring in fine arts and professional writing, was selected as the 2016 winner of the English department’s Cohon Travel Award, a $1,000 grant to help defer the cost of studying abroad at Sheffield Hallam University (SHU) in England. Agyemang is currently studying at SHU through the English department’s study abroad program. “[The program] has made me love writing even more because I have the time and space to dig into my work in a meaningful way,” said Agyemang. Read a Q & A with Agyemang.

January 2016

Margaret “Peg” Calder (MM’66) recently released a video for the Foundation for Alcoholism Research (FAR), in which she proposes that, beyond removing the stigma from alcohol addiction, more treatment options are needed to address the growing problem of alcoholism in the U.S. Calder is the founder and president of FAR. Watch the video.

In addition to his work as professor of history and department chair of the Department of History and Anthropology at the University of Central Missouri, Eric Tenbus (DC’88) is currently researching the politics and rhetoric of beer, brewing and public houses in the late Georgian era. Other areas of interest include religious history in Victorian Britain and Irish history. Learn more about Tenbus and his work.

Panopto, a leading platform provider for capturing video, audio, slides and electronic whiteboard content, has been recognized as a Top Product by the readers of University Business Magazine. The company’s co-founder and CEO Eric Burns (DC’03) developed the tool as an information systems major at CMU in order to help teachers improve the student learning experience through expanded access to multimedia educational materials. Read “Products making a difference on campuses nationwide.”

Candice Morgan (DC’04) has been hired as the first head of diversity at Pinterest. Morgan, a work culture specialist, will lead and help build Pinterest’s diversity and inclusion team. “Diverse teams, in terms of demographics and thought, outperform homogeneous teams on innovation and problem solving,” Morgan said in a Pinterest blog post. “I’ve spent my career advising major businesses on best practice in diversity and inclusion, and am thrilled to join Pinterest, a company committed to bringing the fullest creative potential to our product.” Read more on Forbes.

Corey Ginsberg (DC’05) is featured in “The Verse Envisioned,” a book and gallery exhibition of poetry and art, curated from over 1,000 poems that have appeared over the past 20 years in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. The selected poems served as inspiration for visual artists, including Zivi Aviraz, who created a mixed-media piece in response to Ginsberg’s “Disclaimer to My Future Husband.” Read “Disclaimer to My Future Husband” and view the artwork it inspired.

Alice Feng (DC’14) recently won a data visualization contest sponsored by two OECD/European Commission-funded initiatives called Wikiprogress and Web-COSI. She presented her work at Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) World Forum in Guadalajara, Mexico. "It was an incredible experience getting to meet people from all over the world and talking about data and policy,” Feng said. The aim of the contest was to encourage participants to use well-being measurement in innovative ways. View the winning entries.

November/December 2015

Joseph Rosen (DC 1972) released his debut book, Blues Hands, a collection of photographs from his 30-plus years in blues and music photography. B.B. King, Buddy Guy, Al Green, Willie King, Susan Tedeschi, Derek Trucks, The Blind Boys of Alabama, James Brown and Gary Clark, Jr. are among the featured artists, whose stories are told through powerful imagery, anecdotes and biographical information. Blues Hands is available on Amazon and from major book retailers. View more.

Steven Hoffman (DC 1973), coordinator of the historic preservation program and professor of historic preservation in the Department of History at Southeast Missouri State University, has been selected to receive the institution’s 20th annual PRIDE Award. The Provost’s Research, Instruction and Development for Excellence (PRIDE) Award recognizes a faculty member who demonstrates excellence as a teacher; extraordinary scholarship and service; and other noteworthy accomplishments. “Dr. Hoffman’s leadership has helped the department attain a degree of national visibility due to the degree’s high academic standards,” said Dr. Wayne Bowen, chair of Southeast’s Department of History. Learn more about this honor.

Lou Martin (DC’01), an associate professor of history at Chatham University, recently published Smokestacks in the Hills: Rural-Industrial Workers in West Virginia. The book examines the history of steel and pottery workers in Hancock County, W. Va. “When I was a graduate student, a lot of the labor histories I was reading were written about big cities—Chicago, Detroit, New York City. I wanted to look at workers in a rural, small-town setting and see how their history might be different,” said Martin in a recent Tribune-Review interview. Learn more about Martin’s book.

BNY Mellon recently announced the three winners of its $1M social innovation challenge, UpPrize. Selected from eight finalists, one of those winners is Emily Kennedy (DC’12), whose startup, Marinus Analytics, creates investigative machine-learning software designed to help find and prevent instances of human trafficking. The software—which began as Kennedy’s thesis project—has been used by non-profit victims’ services organizations, criminal intelligence centers and law enforcement agencies. UpPrize is a joint initiative of the BNY Mellon Foundation of Southwestern Pennsylvania and The Forbes Funds, which links the private sector with Pittsburgh area non-profits to identify innovations to address critical needs and produce meaningful financial benefits. Learn more about the UpPrize winners.

After working as a successful freelance writer and publications manager at the California Shakespeare Theater, Keith Spencer (DC’12) has begun pursuing a Ph.D. in literature and creative writing at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His research will examine bureaucracy from a cultural studies standpoint, like much of his recent writing. His article, “Why the Rich Love Burning Man,” was published on Salon and Jacobin before going viral. “My piece was about how a festival that has all these seemingly radical principles can sort of become a playground for the rich to some extent,” said Spencer in an interview on HuffPost Live. Jeff Williams, professor of English, commended Spencer: “He exemplifies one of the best prospects of literary and cultural studies, figuring out how to be an intellectual in contemporary culture.” Read more.

Ashley Karlin (DC’13) recently published a review of Matthieu Ricard’s Altruism, the bestselling follow-up to his book, Happiness. The Los Angeles Review of Books printed the review, which extensively analyzes the 864-page tome through the lens of Karlin’s own experiences and her recent conversations with Ricard. Read the full review.

Alexandre Abitbol (DC’16) will present a paper at the Phi Alpha Theta Biennial Convention, held from January 6-10, 2016 in Orlando, Fla. Originally written for the course The Arts in Pittsburgh, taught by Adjunct History Professor Naum Kats, the paper examines the Pittsburgh coffee house tradition and its roots across the Atlantic in France and in Italy. Learn more about the national history honors society’s convention.

Carson Quiros (DC’16), a professional writing and creative writing double major, has been named to the 2015 Academic All-American Division III Women’s Soccer Team. Quiros is a three-year starter for the Tartans and captain for this year’s team, which is ranked fifth in the nation. Off the field, Quiros, a Delta Gamma Beta Nu member, has served as an editorial intern for Paste Magazine, was a reporting intern for The Chautauquan Daily and was an account assistant for EOS Marketing and Communications. Read more.

Business administration and creative writing double major Blake Chasen (TPR’16) was named one of the 2016 Best and Brightest by Poets & Quants for Undergrads, a higher education website that seeks to create a community of people interested in undergraduate business education. Commenting on why Chasen deserved the honor in a Poets & Quants interview, Stephen G. Pajewski said:“Through hard work and creating opportunities, [Blake] has turned a minor in English into an additional major in creative writing. I look forward to seeing what Blake will be doing five years from now.” Pajewski is the acting executive director of the Tepper School Undergraduate Business Program. See more of the Best and Brightest.

A Carnegie Mellon University student team—Team Tartanium—won the $10,000 grand prize at the 2015 Facebook Global Hackathon by creating a new digital product that supports breaking news 24/7 with real-time eyewitness videos from around the world. The team was comprised of four students, including Avi Romanoff (DC’18), who is majoring in psychology and human-computer interaction. The competition took place over three days in late November at Facebook’s Menlo Park, Calif. headquarters and featured 78 finalists representing 21 teams from 11 countries. Learn more about Team Tartanium’s winning idea.

October 2015

Two CMU grads were among the co-recipients of the Attorney General’s Award for Excellence in Information Technology. Marc Berlove (DC’89) and Robert White (ENG’82) were recognized for their distinguished public service at the 63nd Annual Attorney General’s Awards Ceremony. Read more.

Javier Grillo-Marxuach (DC’91), a creative writing and cultural studies major, writes and produces the popular CW television show, “The 100.”

Jonathan Barnes (DC’93) is a Pittsburgh-based freelance writer who specializes in architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) and writes about construction technology for BuiltWorlds. Barnes recently profiled FASTTAC, a growing project management software company that was born from research done by students and faculty in CMU’s Civil Engineering Department. Read more.

Award-winning fiction writer Carolyn Menke’s (DC’95) debut novel “Return To Me” was released September 2015. Published by Wild Rose Press, “Return To Me” is set in the 1940s and follows Sadie Stark as she falls for a war-bound soldier and uncovers pieces of her mother’s past. Menke returned to CMU in October to speak to students about her new novel, life as a writer and tips on writing fiction. Learn more about "Return To Me.”

Javier Soltero (DC’98) attended Carnegie Mellon University at the dawn of the Internet era. Since then, Soltero – an information systems major with a concentration in computational finance – has climbed to the top of the technology industry. However, Soltero’s path to becoming the corporate vice president of Outlook Program Management at Microsoft was not without hurdles. He recently shared his experiences with the CMU community and met with current students.
“I Never Learned To Spell ‘Successful’” was the first lecture in the Dietrich College Entrepreneurs Speaker Series and was also sponsored by the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Watch a video of his lecture, view photos from his visit and learn more.

In less than 12 months, Michael Rectenwald (DC’04) will have published three books in one year. Rectenwald, who received his Ph.D. in literary and cultural studies, wrote “Global Secularisms in a Post-Secular Age: Religion and Modernity in the Global Age,” “Academic Writing, Real World Topics” and “Nineteenth-Century British Secularism: Science, Religion and Literature.” Learn more.

In his new book, Adam Lazarus (DC’06) goes behind the scenes of the legendary Super Bowl champion Washington Redskins teams during former coach Joe Gibbs’ era in the 1980s and early 1990s. Lazarus’ “Hail to the Redskins” looks into Gibb’s career from a fresh perspective. Read more.

Tommy Oliver (DC’06) - a double economics and digital media major - is now a major Hollywood producer. Oliver’s latest movie is "The Perfect Guy” and is about how one woman's interest in a charming man evolves into fear. Read more.

Olivia Benson (DC’07) has been named to Pittsburgh Magazine’s “40 Under 40.” Benson, currently a program manager at the Efficiency Network, was honored for her work in government communications. Learn more.

A new short film by Yulin Kuang (DC’12) documents LGBT couples from all 50 states. “Love Wins in All 50 States” premiered on YouTube’s in-house channel on October 27. YouTube approached Kuang to produce a video that would explore themes she’s worked with previously. The end result: a film that celebrates her love of literature and love. CMU English Professor Kristina Straub also participated in the film. Watch "Love Wins in All 50 States” and read Kuang’s blog post reflecting on the experience.

Brian Trimboli (DC’16) – a senior technical writing and communication major – has landed a job at Salesforce, one of Fortune Magazine’s “100 Best Companies to Work For.” Read more.

Luke Hottinger (DC’17), an information systems major, unveiled his new project aimed to help the blind at Pittsburgh’s Maker Faire. “Coral” is an audio game for the visually impaired. Learn more.

September 2015

Thomas Croak (DC’78) has been at DePaul University since 1977 in number academic and administrative capacities. This year, Croak celebrated his 50th anniversary of ordination to the Catholic priesthood in the Congregation of the Mission, popularly known as the Vincentians. He retired from DePaul University in 2012 but continues as an emeritus faculty member in the History Department and the founder of the university’s Thomas Croak Student Legal Service Office.

Erika Bañuelos (DC’96) recently resigned from her construction job to design and project manage the construction of her own yoga studio and then teach classes full-time. Her studio will be the only studio in Denver that will offer bilingual classes. Bañuelos currently sits on the board of directors for the Tartans Athletic Club and has taught yoga to the women's soccer team in the past. She is working on establishing a mentorship program for current CMU athletes.

Javier Soltero (DC’98) attended CMU at the dawn of the Internet era. Since then, Soltero – an information systems major – has climbed to the top of the technology industry. However, Soltero’s path to becoming the corporate vice president of Outlook Program Management at Microsoft was not without hurdles. He will share his experiences with the CMU community on Wednesday, Oct. 7 from 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. in the College of Fine Arts’ Kresge Theater. Learn more.

Michael Dwyer’s (DC’03) first book “Back to the Fifties: Nostalgia, Hollywood Film and Popular Music of the Seventies and Eighties” is not your usual coffee table read looking at 1950s nostalgia. Instead, Dwyer said he examines how "the Fifties" was a vision of America circulated through film and popular music of the 1970s and 1980s. Learn more.

Emily Kennedy (DC’12), an ethics, history and public policy major, is the founder of Marinus Analytics. The company develops and deploys technologies to the hands of law enforcement, advancing their ability to fight crimes like human trafficking, using machine learning and big data technology. Kennedy began creating the software products while she was a student at CMU and through her current work as a rsearch associate in the Robotics Institute. Her work was recently profiled in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Mikhail Popov (DC’13) was interviewed by Master’s in Data Science about his life as a statistician. Popov is a data analyst at the Wikimedia Foundation, home of Wikipedia. Prior to that, he worked as a statistician at a neuropsychology research program with the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC. Read the interview.

Zora Gilbert, a senior linguistics major, was part of the team behind Slate.com’s popular “The United Slang of America” article this summer. Gilbert, who was also just announced as a 2016 Andrew Carnegie Society Scholar, provided research assistance. The article was shared more than 50 thousand times on social media and generated nearly 800 comments. Read it.

Melanie Diaz, a junior majoring in English and professional writing, interned at the Council on Hemispheric Affairs last spring while she was in the Washington Semester Program. A report Diaz wrote, "How US Private Prisons Profit From Immigrant Detention," was recently referenced in a Huffington Post opinion piece authored by Bernie Sanders, a democratic candidate for president and a U.S. senator from Vermont. Read Sanders' "We Must End For-Profit Prisons." 

Kevin Jarbo, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Psychology, has been named the 2015 winner of the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC) Outstanding Paper Award. Jarbo’s paper, "Converging Structural and Functional Connectivity of Orbitofrontal, Dorsolateral Prefrontal, and Posterior Parietal Cortex in the Human Striatum,” was chosen from a pool of manuscripts submitted by students at the University of Pittsburgh and CMU. The study identified new ways that several brain areas communicate. Learn more about it.

August 2015

Patrick Cavanagh (DC’72) started out as a computer and electrical engineer, but an interest in artificial intelligence led him to Carnegie Mellon University, where he could study “the really big computer.” Since receiving his Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from CMU, Cavanagh worked on aspects of memory and now focuses on how the visual perception system constructs our three-dimensional world. Read a recent Q&A with Cavanagh that appeared in #CMUPsych, the Department of Psychology newsletter.

Dana S. Dunn (DC'82) is the editor of The Oxford Handbook of Psychology Undergraduate Education, which was recently published by Oxford University Press. Dunn is also editor-in-chief of the online reference tool, Oxford Bibliographies (OB): Psychology.

The Idaho Prize for Poetry has selected “Fugitives,” a manuscript by Carnegie Mellon University alumna Danielle Pieratti (CMU’00), as its 2015 winner. A national poetry competition, the prize annually awards a poet $1,000 for the best book-length collection. Lost Horse Press publishes the winning manuscripts. Acclaimed novelist and poet Kim Addonizio judged this year’s submissions. Read more.

Christine de Briffault (DC’08) received the Young Lawyer Division Service to Community Award at the recent KY Bar Association Convention.

Laura Thoren (DC’10), who majored in history, has been hired by Chicago’s ABC 7 affiliate as a reporter. Thoren will leave Albuquerque, New Mexico’s ABC station to take this new role. Jennifer Graves, vice president and news director at ABC 7, said, “Laura is an aggressive reporter who is always looking to uncover the next big story.” Learn more.

The Musée d’Histoire in Strasbourg, France is planning to include a collection based on a World War I photography book created by Dean Putney (DC’11) in their permanent collection. Putney used what he learned in his CMU History of Photography class when he discovered his great grandfather’s photos from his army service to create the book, "Walter Koessler 1914-1918: The personal photo journal of a German officer in World War I." A corresponding exhibit, "Photography in the Trenches, 1914-1918," is running at the Carnegie Museum of Art through December 2014. Learn more about the book.

Chloe Fraboni (DC’11), a creative writing major, is writing a new series for Simon & Schuster, where she is an associate editor. Fraboni will pen "Living In . . ." - a series about kids growing up in different countries around the world. Each book will profile a child growing up in his or her home country and offers an inside look at what their average school day is like. Learn more.

July 2015

Emery Roth (DC’71, ’72) will publish a book this fall: “Brass Valley: Fall of an American Industry” is a book of photographs, poems and essays about America’s brass industry, and by extension it is about the era of industrial innovation and the growth of middle class culture. Read more.

Samira Shaheen (DC’76) – who majored in history, philosophy and fine arts - used the language of art to bridge and explore her Palestinian roots and the issues that continue to threaten Palestinians and a viable Palestinian statehood. Her art exhibit, “Rights of Passage,” was featured at The Spinning Plate Gallery in Pittsburgh, PA during July 2015.

Henry Giroux (DC'77) wrote “The Last Word” for the May 2015 issue of Carnegie Mellon Today. Giroux is a world-renowned educator, author, and public intellectual. He opened the piece with, “During my studies at Carnegie Mellon, I learned something profound: Knowledge cannot be separated from power; civic literacy cannot be removed from public memory; and one should never take democratic freedoms for granted.” Read more.

The Heinz Endowments appointed Andrew McElwaine (DC’98), an environmental leader and former Endowments’ staff member, to the new position of senior program director for sustainability and the environment. Read more.

Scott Bricker (DC '99) has been named to the Pittsburgh Business Times’ Fast Trackers of 2015 list. Bricker is the executive director of Bike Pittsburgh. Learn more.

Misty Muscatel (TPR’05) – who had an additional major in Spanish - received Google’s Great Manager Award last fall. Muscatel was selected from a pool of about 2,000 nominees for one of 22 awards worldwide. Based in New York City, she was the only U.S. employee in sales to receive the award. This award and Google’s approach to identifying winners has been covered by The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, etc. Muscatel is responsible for the Unilever brand’s Google marketing and advertising worldwide. She’s been with Google since 2005.

A poem by Lillian-Yvonne Bertram (DC’06) was chosen by The Buffalo News as a Poem of the Week. The choice coincided with a reading in the city. Read the poem and learn more.

Jamie Edwards (DC’07) has returned to Carnegie Mellon to assume the role of assistant director of Title IX Initiatives. Edwards earned her juris doctorate with a certificate in public health from the University of Pennsylvania. Following her education at Penn, Edwards worked as a law clerk in the Superior Court of New Jersey and as an associate for McGuireWoods in Pittsburgh. While a student at Carnegie Mellon, she served in a variety of leadership roles, most notably as the Gender Issues Intern leading numerous campus education and outreach programs related to sexual violence prevention.

Marci Calabretta (DC’11) won the 2015 Donald Hall Prize for Poetry. Part of the Association of Writers & Writing Programs Award Series, the award is given annually for excellent new book-length works. Read more.

The U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences (IES) has selected alumnus Nathan VanHoudnos (DC’14) as this year’s outstanding fellow from its Predoctoral Interdisciplinary Research Training Programs in the Education Sciences. IES recognizes one recipient each year for academic accomplishments and contributions to education research. VanHoudnos received his Ph.D. in statistics and public policy. During his time at CMU, he was also a Program for Interdisciplinary Education Research (PIER) fellow. Learn more about VanHoudnos.

Sam Ventura (DC’15), who just received his Ph.D. in statistics, has been hired by the Pittsburgh Penguins as an analytics expert. Ventura is the co-founder of the hockey analytics website war-on-ice.com. Learn more.

Laura Pacilio (DC’16) was selected as the 2015 recipient of the Erwin R. Steinberg Master of Arts in Professional Writing (MAPW) Scholarship. The award recognizes a third semester MAPW student who has excelled in the program’s Style course and exemplifies the values that characterized Steinberg’s career in scholarship, teaching, and administration at Carnegie Mellon. Those values include integrity, intellectual curiosity, and citizenship. Read more.

May 2015

Gay Giordano (DC’82) who received her B.A. in creative writing from the Department of English, published her poetry collection of dreamlike poems, "Waking From So Rich A Nightmare."

Alexei Cohen (DC’92) was recently chosen by Avalon Publishing to write “Moon Rome Florence Venice.” The travel guide will be published in late 2016 and distributed both in print and digitally. This is the second guide and the tenth book overall Cohen has written. He lives in Rome Italy with his wife and two children.

Roy Wilson (DC’93) published the third volume in the series “Mulling Over School and Life.” In “I am, Hear me Roar,” Wilson builds on work done in previous volumes, beginning a systematic examination of the relationships between the sex, kind of dominant reflexivity, and social status of the study participants. He also presents Qualitative Comparative Analysis, an analytical tool that allows researchers to entertain, and evaluate, explicitly causal claims in connection with very small datasets.

Amy Berger (DC’00) is the author of “The Alzheimer’s Antidote,” a new e-book that puts all the pieces together in one place: What causes Alzheimer’s, why it’s happening and what to do about it. Learn more about it and follow Berger’s blog.

Nick Cole (DC’09)  - an Andrew Carnegie Society Gift Officer in CMU’s University Advancement division, has taken a position as a director of development at UC Berkeley. Cole will be ensconced in the College of Letters & Sciences with a focus on mathematical and physical sciences. He recently helped to secure a major (and first-time) gift from alumnus Archit Kumar (DC’12) and his family. The gift named a conference room in the Information Systems Program.

Caroline Kessler (DC’11) was awarded a fully funded fellowship to enroll in the MFA program in poetry at Washington University in St. Louis. Kessler was also awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to Poland but is declining it to attend Washington University and pursue writing full-time this fall. Kessler majored in creative writing and minored in religious studies.

Kathryn McKeough, a 2015 graduate with a B.S. in physics with an additional major in statistics, received the Judith A. Resnik Award during commencement weekend. The award, which honors Carnegie Mellon alumna and space shuttle Challenger astronaut Dr. Judith A. Resnik, is presented annually to an outstanding woman graduating in the sciences or engineering who plans to attend graduate school and whose academic performance, creativity and vision illustrate potential for high academic achievement in her field. Learn more.

Ethics, History and Public Policy major Marie Avilez (DC’15) has won the Dietrich College’s annual Gretchen Lankford Prize. The prize is named after the late Gretchen Goldsmith Lankford, a 1943 graduate of Margaret Morrison College who received her master’s degree in public management from the Heinz School in 1990. The award represents Lankford’s deep conviction that “devoted teaching makes a difference in the lives of young people, helping them to fulfill their potentials as intellectuals, citizens, and as human beings.” Caroline Acker, head of the Department of History, enthusiastically endorsed Avilez for the Lankford Prize, saying that she has identified one of the most challenging areas of education to focus on: working with children with disabilities. Learn more.

Dan Walter, who just received his Ph.D. in second language acquisition from the Department of Modern Languages, has won the Dietrich College’s Graduate Student Teaching Award. Walter has taught in both the Modern Languages and English departments, teaching courses such as “Reading and Writing for an Academic Context” and “Elementary German I.” He also spent a summer teaching English writing and presentation skills to international students as part of an intensive college preparatory program for entry into CMU-Qatar. Last fall, he served as acting director of Second Language Writing and supervised the First-Year Writing Program instructors. Learn more.

Out of a pool of about 30 applicants, only two students are selected for CMU’s Posner Center internship each year. Current Literary and Cultural Studies Ph.D. student Matthew Lambert was selected for his proposed exhibit on the early nineteenth century American author, Washington Irving. Lambert was looking for a way to gain experience working with special collections and putting together information in a visual way using objects and pictures, so he proposed the exhibit. The judges loved his idea. Read more.

April 2015

Kayt Sukel (DC’95) interviewed Psychology Professor Marlene Behrmann for an article on the Dana Foundation’s website. In “Studying the Blind Leads to New Insights in Human Brain Specialization,” Behrmann, the George A. and Helen Dunham Cowan Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience and CMU co-director of the Center for Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC), discusses seeking insights from damaged brains through neuroimaging. Sukel is a freelance science writer and the author of “This is Your Brain on Sex” and the forthcoming “The Art of Risk.” Read the article.

Jennifer Andrus (DC’09), who received her Ph.D. in rhetoric from the Department of English, published her first book, “Entextualizing Domestic Violence: Language Ideology and Violence Against Women in the Anglo-American Hearsay Principle.” In it, Andrus discusses how legal views about language, or languages ideologies, fit with, reproduce and recirculate ideas about victims of domestic violence. Learn more.

Elyssa Goodman (DC '10) is the photographer behind the new book “Awkwafina's NYC,” written by Nora "Awkwafina" Lum of MTV's Girl Code. The book was released earlier this month and was published by Clarkson Potter, a division of Random House. Learn more.

Emma Livne (DC ’15), a global studies and pre-med major, received the Carnegie Mellon Women’s Association (CMWA) special award in honor of Mary Suresh and her dedication to the healthcare industry. The CMWA provides networking opportunities to women affiliated with CMU through a variety of programs and events held throughout the year. For the past 50 years, the CMWA has provided annual scholarship awards to deserving undergraduate senior women. The funds for the annual scholarships are derived directly from annual membership dues and event fees throughout the year.

History Professor Jay D. Aronson and Senior Ethics, History and Public Policy Major Christophe Combemale wrote an opinion piece in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on how the City of Pittsburgh can balance privacy and public safety. Their suggestions stem from a semester-long project that Aronson led with 10 ethics, history and public policy seniors last semester. At the invitation of City Councilman Dan Gilman (DC’04), the Dietrich College students researched the history of surveillance technology, analyzing how similar cities have implemented different tools and policies and developing recommendations for Pittsburgh. Then, they presented their findings to City Council, Debra Lam, director of the city’s Department of Innovation and Performance, and Pittsburgh’s new Chief of Police Cameron McLay. Read "Keeping an eye on Pittsburgh:We can learn a lot from other cities’ surveillance policies.”

The Department of Psychology has selected Anna Vande Velde (DC’15) and Adam Dickter (DC’17) as the recipients of the inaugural Ireland Undergraduate Research Awards. The awards, funded by an endowment from the George and Elizabeth Ireland family, were established to support high-quality undergraduate research projects. Vande Velde and Dickter will each receive $1,500 to support their work. Learn more.

March 2015

Phil Simon (DC’93) has published another book, “Message Not Received: Why Business Communication Is Broken and How to Fix It.”

Jennifer D. Keene (DC’91), a professor of history and chairs the History Department at Chapman University in Orange, Calif., is speaking at Le Jardin inside the Cantigny Park Visitors Center outside of Chicago. Keene will discuss her book, “World War I: The American Soldier Experience.” Learn more.

Alumna Jessie B. Ramey (DC’09), who is currently an adjunct professor in the History Department and the Humanities Scholars Program at CMU, has been selected as the inaugural director of the new Chatham University's Women's Institute. Read more.

John Geyer (DC’14) and Samantha Reynard (DC’12), recently won Merit Awards in the Society for Technical Communication (STC) Touchstone Competition for documentation they created while working at Salesforce, a global cloud computing company known for being the global leader in Customer Relationship Management. Read more.

Nathaniel Eliason (DC’15) wrote an article for Zapier on “20+ Productivity Apps for College Students and Young Professionals.”

Christophe Combemale (DC’15), a senior Ethics, History and Public Policy major who is also a student in the Heinz College’s accelerated master’s degree program, was part of a winning team at the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs and Administration’s (NASPAA) inaugural student simulation competition. The competition, held at the University of Maryland, brought together graduate students from NASPAA schools to analyze a current health policy problem and recommend a bottom-up approach to reform. “In the simulation, we were tasked with improving productivity and increasing the quality, access, cost and supply of health care and every time we looked at our initiatives we found that funding was the main limiting factor,” Combemale said. He said the team focused on programs that led to cost savings, such as preventative care, and used those savings to pay for more initiatives. “It was really the layering of initiatives that helped us succeed,” Combemale said.

Shomiron (Ronnie) Ghose (DC’17) has been selected as a fellow in the Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers (KPCB) Fellowship Program. KPCB is a venture capital firm in Silicon Valley, and their fellowship program is a top engineering program for young people interested in technology and entrepreneurship. The program pairs top engineering students from across the country with leading edge startups in Silicon Valley. Their work experience is additionally supplemented with incredible events and programming led by CEOs and executives from KPCB portfolio companies and KPCB Partners including Design Partner John Maeda (formerly president of the Rhode Island School of Design), Mike Abbott (former Twitter VP of engineering and on Obama's team to help fix HealthCare.gov) and John Doerr (a legendary venture capitalist who is well-known for helping build Amazon, Google, Twitter, and many other companies). Learn more.

February 2015

Kathleen Painter (DC '88) was recently featured "In the Spotlight" on the Heinz Foundation website for her role in bringing classical music to Pittsburgh communities. Read more.

Nik Bonaddio (DC’04), who received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in information systems from CMU, was recently featured in the Wall Street Journal for his startup numberFire. Read “Can Big Data Predict the Super Bowl? One Startup Says It Can.”

Amanda Bradford (DC’06), who majored in information systems, was featured in the New York Times for founding “The League,” a new dating app. Read “The League, a Dating App for Would-Be Power Couples.”

Maja Orsic (DC’10), a professional writing and French and Francophone Studies major, is the director of the Robert Klein Gallery, a fine art photography gallery. Orsic is curating a photography exhibition, The Gun Show, for Boston's Flash Forward Festival this May. The festival is organized by the Magenta Foundation, which also runs Magenta POP: Pittsburgh, a series of outdoor art installations in downtown Pittsburgh.

Laura Berry (DC’16), a creative writing and Japanese Studies major, will travel to New Mexico to present her work at the International English Honor Society’s Sigma Tau Delta’s International Convention. Berry, a member of CMU’s Sigma Tau Delta chapter Omega Tau, will present her collection of short fiction stories titled “Rulebreaker’s Vigil” alongside other English majors across the country. Learn more.

January 2015

Steve Abel (DC’75) recently completed 300 hour advanced yoga teacher training, and enrolled in studies of Ayurveda.

Jimmer Podrasky (DC ’80) Of Woodland Hills, Calif., released “The Would-Be Plans,” his first album in 23 years, to critical acclaim. Learn more: jimmermusic.com

Melanie Patrick (DC ’86, HNZ ’87) of Chicago is an Advanced Pricing and Manual Agreement senior economist at the U.S. Treasury. She was profiled by CNN-Money in June 2014, in relation to the Google self-evaluation regarding diversity within hiring, retention, promotion, and executive ranks.

Jeffrey Cohen (DC ’90) was recently awarded the District Award of Merit by the White Oak District of the National Capital Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) and completed the course work for the BSA Wood Badge. He was also reelected to a seventh consecutive term as treasurer of the Beth Joshua Congregation in Rockville.

Nina Kuhl (DC ’91) is an associate real estate broker for Cherry Creek Properties in Greater Denver, Colo. After working in corporate America for many years, she made the switch to real estate, where she utilizes her technical and project management skills. Learn more: kuhl-nina.com.

John Vresilovic (DC ’91) has written a comedic and satirical novel about Pittsburgh, The Hot Dog (CreateSpace, 2014) under his pen name, John Novak. Retired Pittsburgh Post-Gazette columnist Peter Leo calls it “laugh-out-loud funny and smart with great Pittsburgh touches.” Learn more: johnqnovak.weebly.com

Heather Dawn Thompson (DC ’93) is an attorney with the international law firm Greenberg Traurig. Her practice is in American Indian law, government law and policy, and gaming practices. She splits her time between the firm’s Washington, D.C. and Denver, Colo., offices. She is a member off the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of South Dakota and earned her law degree from Harvard Law School.

Diana Burley (DC’ 98) coauthored the new book, "Enterprise Software Security: A Confluence of Disciplines" published December 2014 by Addison Wesley in the Software Security Series. Read more. Burley was also named 2014 Cybersecurity Educator of the Year by the Colloquium for Information Systems Security. 

Brett Gordon (DC ’02, TPR ’04, ’07) is an associate professor of marketing at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His interests span multiple industries: from the effects of competition on pricing and innovation in the microprocessor market, to business-cycle-induced shifts in brand loyalty in consumer packaged goods, to the effects of smoking bans on cigarette consumption, and, most recently, to the effectiveness of political advertising and reforming the Electoral College.

Nicoleta Serban (DC ’02, ’05) is an associate professor of industrial and systems engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. She has coauthored Understanding and Managing the Complexity of Healthcare (MIT Press, 2014). In the book, Serban and coauthor William Rouse approach the topic from the perspectives of engineering and statistics for designing a healthcare system that is more efficient, effective, and equitable. Learn more: mitpress.mit.edu.

Jennifer Resick Williams (DC ’02, ’03) of Washington, D.C., is the founder of Know Public Relations. She and her team work with culinary artisans, celebrated chefs, and entrepreneurs to build hospitality brands. Recently, she established the Resick Broad Horizons Award at the Community Foundation for the Alleghenies. The annual award enables a student in Forest Hills High School (Sidman, Pa.) to attend a summer program, visit colleges, or cover college application costs. Resick Williams is a Forest Hills graduate. Learn more: www.knowpr.com; http://www.cfalleghenies.org.

Gary Lupyan (DC ’05, ’07) is an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he researches the evolution of language and its effects on human cognition. He recently married Emily Ward, who is a doctoral student in psychology at Yale, where she researches the neural mechanisms of visual perception.

Benjamin McGrath (DC ’13) is a research analyst in the Software Business Strategies Group at Massachusetts-based IDC, which is a provider of market intelligence, advisory services, and events for information technology, telecommunications, and consumer technology. McGrath provides insight into the SaaS industry and is responsible for maintaining databases and models for the SaaS and cloud software programs. He began his career at IDC in 2010 as an intern.

Five CMU student winners and six local high school winners in the Martin Luther King Jr. Writing Awards were interviewed by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about the topic of identity, what it means to them, how they define themselves and how they want others to perceive them. The CMU students who participated were all from the Dietrich College: Siriana Abboud, Joshua Brown, Michelle Mathew, Michael Mingo and Sophie Rose Zucker. Watch the video.

December 2014

Dana S. Dunn (DC ’82), professor of psychology and assistant dean for special projects at Moravian College, recently published the book “The Social Psychology of Disability” with Oxford University Press. Additionally, Dunn was awarded a Presidential Citation from the American Psychological Association's Division 2, the Society for the Teaching of Psychology. The award is presented to individuals who have made extraordinary lifetime contributions to the society and/or to the teaching of psychology. To date, Dunn has written or co-written more than 150 articles, chapters, and book reviews and has written or edited 19 books. He has focused his scholarship on examining teaching, learning and liberal education, as well as the social psychology of disability.

Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald presented Dennis Wilke (DC’91) and Rosedale Technical College with a proclamation honoring the institution as the county's newest college and acknowledging its recent success in preparing graduates for jobs in skilled trades. Read more.

Lillian-Yvonne Bertram (DC'06) has been awarded a Creative Writing Fellowship in Poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts. The $25,000 fellowships enable recipients to set aside time for writing, research, travel and general career advancement. Read the complete list of 2014 recipients.

Sara (Harenchar) Levinson (DC’10) is now Enterprise Sales Manager for ClickTale in California. Sara worked at IBM in California for 2 years before making the move to a startup. In January 2014, Levinson’s essay “Something About Pittsburgh” was published in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s Saturday edition, received over 10,000 Facebook likes and was shared more than 250 times on Twitter. Her writing also appeared in “The American Scholar” earlier this year. Learn more.

October 2014

Dave Brotherton (DC’97) has joined Shop24, a leader in the automated retail sector, as vice president of marketing and business development. Learn more.

Survey Magazine named Ross McGowan (DC’12) one of the “20 Researchers You Need To Know in 2014.” McGowan received a Masters in Statistical Practice from CMU and is currently the director of data science at CivicScience, a Pittsburgh-based polling company. Read more.

Sarah Ceurvorst (BHA'13) was featured in a Pittsburgh Tribune-Review article on her experience as a Fulbright Scholar. In 2013, Ceurvorst received a Fulbright Award for an English Teaching Assistantship in the Maha Sarakham Province of Thailand. Read the article.

Elizabeth Finley, a student in the Department of English’s Master of Arts in Professional Writing (MAPW) Program, wrote a piece for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s The Next Page titled "CMU Classroom innovator brought science and art under same roof." Finley adapted the piece from an assignment she wrote about her mentor, Patricia Maurides, adjunct associate professor of art. Read it.

September 2014

Raymond T. Betler (E’79, DC’79) of Pittsburgh is president, CEO, and a member of the Board of Directors of Wabtec, which is a provider of technology-based products and services for rail and industrial markets. Betler has been with Wabtec since 2008 and previously had served as president and COO. He has more than 35 years of experience in the transportation industry.

Robert Szymczak (DC’80) won the Polish Gold Cross of Merit, one of Poland’s highest honors, at a June 23 gathering at the University of Warsaw. Read more.

Ken Koons (DC’87) is a professor of history at Virginia Military Institute, where he has taught courses in social and economic history since 1982. His research and writing focus on the history of society and economy in the Pennsylvania and Virginia subsections of the Great Valley of Ap-palachia. Also, he serves as a consultant to museums, government agencies, and various non-profit organizations on issues relating to the history of agriculture and rural life.

Judy Haraburda (DC’90) authored Perfectly Pie (Catbird Creative, 2013), a children’s book, which was illustrated by her friend Wes Richards. The book chronicles the antics of Haraburda’s real-life cats, Olive and Pat. Haraburda and Richards appeared at the Collingswood Book Festi-val in New Jersey last October.

Nina Kuhl (DC’91) assists clients with buying and selling residential real estate in the Denver, Colo., metro area.

Greg Wilson (DC’91) of Ames, Iowa, is an assistant professor of rhetoric and professional communication at Iowa State University. His research areas pertain to how groups of people solve technical problems with language. He also earned a PhD in rhetoric and professional communication from New Mexico State University.

Phil Simon (DC’93) is working on his seventh book, “Message Not Received: How New Technologies and Simpler Language Can Fix Your Business Communications.” It will be published in May 2015.

Evelyn Remaley (DC’95) of Washington, D.C., is deputy associate administrator for the Office of Policy Analysis and Development in the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Telecom and Information Administration (NTIA). Remaley is helping lead NTIA’s efforts to promote open-ness and innovation on the Internet.

Thomas J. McKeeff (DC’98) is a cognitive neuroscientist at Harvard University and investigates the complex relationship between the brain and behavior. His research focuses primarily on the cortical and cognitive mechanisms that underlie perception, attention, action, and awareness.

Ben Kartzman (DC’00) is CEO and co-founder of Spongecell, a New York City-based ad-tech company that creates interactive online ads for brand advertisers and their agencies. Under his leadership, Spongecell has become one of the fastest-growing companies in the United States. Before co-founding Spongecell, he worked in consulting, first at Bridgeline Software and then at Accenture.

Brian S. Rosinski (DC’01) is a partner at the Pittsburgh-based McCarthy McDonald Schulberg & Joy law firm, where he concentrates his practice in family law. He was selected by Super Lawyers to be included on its 2014 Pennsylvania Rising Stars list, an honor limited to only 2.5% of eligible attorneys. He also holds leadership roles with several non-profit organizations.

Jennifer Resick Williams (DC’02,’03) of Washington, DC, is the founder of Know Public Relations. She and her team work with culinary artisans, celebrated chefs, and entrepreneurs to build hospitality brands. Recently, she established the Resick Broad Horizons Award at the Community Foundation for the Alleghenies. The annual award enables a student in Forest Hills High School (Sidman, Pa.) to attend a summer program, visit colleges, or cov-er college application costs. Resick Williams is a Forest Hills graduate.

Tommy Oliver (DC’06) was the producer, director, and writer of the film “1982,” which was re-cently screened and was filmed in Philadelphia. The film is based on his life and was shot in his childhood home and on locations he frequented growing up. Oliver has a crime/psycho-thriller and a TV series in the works. He produced the film “Destined” in summer 2014 with director Qasim Basir in Detroit, Mich.

Nathan Lubchenco (DC’10) is a data scientist for Simple Energy, a Boulder, Colo.-based start-up that motivates people to save energy in a way that is social, fun, and simple.

Aimee Bedoy Murphy (DC’11) received the Young Leader Award at the Susan B. Anthony List’s annual Campaign for Life Gala. The gala honors individuals who are advocates for women and unborn children.

The Undergraduate Awards named “Brief Mindfulness Meditation Training and Stress Reactivity: Mechanisms and Outcomes” by Hayley Rahl (DC’14) a highly commended paper in the psychology category.

July 2014

“The Last Stratiote,” the latest book by LeAnn Neal Reilly (DC’92), was honored with the Bronze award in the category of Fantasy at Foreword Reviews’ 2014 IndieFab Book of the Year Awards. Representing hundreds of independent and university presses of all sizes, the winners were selected after months of editorial deliberation over more than 1,500 entries in 60 categories. This year’s list of winners exemplify the best work coming from today’s indie authors and publishers.

Heather Dawn Thompson (DC’93) is an attorney with the international law firm Greenberg Traurig. Her practice is in American Indian law, government law and policy and gaming practices. She splits her time between the firm’s Washington D.C. and Denver offices. She is a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of South Dakota and earned her law degree from Harvard Law School. Read more.

Kent Haina (DC’00) graduated from the Columbia University School of Nursing with a bachelors degree in nursing.

Thomas Sweterlitsch (DC’00, ’01) has published his first novel, “Tomorrow and Tomorrow.” Ten years since the city of Pittsburgh was reduced to ash, the book follows survivor John Dominic Blaxton, who remains obsessed with the past. Grieving for his wife and unborn child who perished in the blast, Dominic relives his lost life by immersing in the Archive—a fully interactive digital reconstruction of Pittsburgh, accessible to anyone who wants to visit the places they remember and the people they loved. Stewart O’Nan author of “The Odds” calls “Tomorrow and Tomorrow,” “Simultaneously trippy and hardboiled. [It] is a smart, dark noir… Sweterlisch's debut is a wild mashup of Raymond Chandler, Philip K. Dick and William S. Burroughs, and, like their work, utterly visionary.” Sony Pictures has already bought the film rights to the book. Read more.

May 2014

Jesse Kates (DC’00, CS’01) and his pop band from Kansas City, The Sexy Accident, is getting ready to release their fifth album, Lavender 3…in an innovative format: a pop album as a hardback book. Find out more.

Zachary Branson
(DC’14) has won the 2014 Gretchen Lankford Prize, which is presented annually to a Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences graduating senior who has achieved academic distinction, demonstrated accomplishment and potential as a rising educator, and who plans for graduate school and eventual entry into a career in teaching. Read more.

Joshua Swanson
(DC’15) led a team of researchers who found the difference in depression rates between men and women may be exaggerated by men's tendency to under-report their depressive symptoms. Swanson presented data from the study on April 23 at the annual meeting of the Society of Behavioral Medicine conference in Philadelphia. Read more.

Jasper Wang’s (DC’17) poem “Long Distance” was published in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Read it.

Russell Golman, director of the Dietrich College’s Quantitative Social Science Scholars (QSSS) Program, and academic adviser Kathleen Conway have joined QSSS students Colleen Hamilton, Stanley Krasner, Richa Mohan, Steven Wang and Hannah Worrall to create a new video promoting the QSSS program and to help explain the program to prospective students. The QSSS program is a unique opportunity to help outstanding undergraduates acquire advanced quantitative technical skills they can use to impact society as entrepreneurs, policymakers or social scientists. Watch the video at http://youtu.be/pCXhFXLD2G4.

April 2014

Jonathan Barnes (DC’93) recently began specializing in web content writing and has written about unmanned cargo ships for Forbes, and on Personal Rapid Transit, for Xerox. Read recent pieces at the links below.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/ptc/2014/03/26/why-the-next-captain-phillips-might-be-a-drone/
http://www.realbusiness.com/2014/01/transportation-gets-personal/

Sarah Novak (DC’05), associate professor or Psychology at Hofstra University, was selected as a 2013-2014 teacher of the year.

Thomas E. Oliver (DC’06) is the producer-director-writer of the new drama, “1982.” Read more.

Bryan Ovalle (DC'06) has just been hired as the manager of special projects for Ryan Herco Flow Solutions reporting to the CEO. Ryan Herco is the nation's leading industrial distributor of filtration and fluid handling products.

Andrew Hafenbrack (DC'09), currently a Ph.D candidate in organizational behavior at INSEAD in Singapore, and his advisors Zoe Kinias and Sigal Barsade published a further-developed version of his master's thesis, "Debiasing the Mind Through Meditation: Mindfulness and the Sunk-Cost Bias" in the journal Psychological Science.

Laura Stiles (DC’14), a double major in creative and professional writing, has been selected as the Dietrich College recipient of the Carnegie Mellon Women’s Association award for outstanding women students. Each year, since 1964, the Women's Association has awarded scholarships to outstanding women students. Since 1996, these awards have been presented to senior women, rotating through all colleges of the university. This year the awards will be presented to one student from each of the following colleges: Carnegie Institute of Technology, Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the Tepper School of Business.

March 2014

“The Windmills of Your Mind,” the second volume in the “Mulling Over School and Life” series by Roy Wilson (DC’83), has recently been published in print by CreateSpace and is also available in digital (and, soon, audio) format from a variety of distributors. Visit Wilson’s blog at http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7107473.Roy_W_Wilson/blog.

Patrick Flynn (DC’88) joined the law firm of Tucker Ellis as counsel in their business department. Flynn has more than 20 years of combined in-house counsel experience with a major steel company and private practice experience. As in-house counsel he has held positions as a general counsel, assistant general counsel, and lead mergers and acquisitions counsel. He has also built legal teams and provided direct counsel to boards of directors and executive management teams on a wide variety of company “best practices” initiatives, including regulatory management, compliance, contract management, loss mitigation, litigation management, employee relations, and governance. Prior to his in-house counsel experience, Flynn spent more than a decade in private practice as a corporate and securities attorney, where he worked on high-profile domestic and international mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, recapitalizations, and financings.

“The Last Stratiote,” the latest book by LeAnn Neal Reilly (DC’92), has been named a finalist for Book of the Year by Foreward Reviews, the only review magazine solely dedicated indie publishers. A celebration of the winners will take place during the American Library Association Annual Conference in Las Vegas on Friday, June 27 at 6 p.m., with awards in over sixty categories, cash prizes for the best in fiction and nonfiction, and widespread recognition.

Erin Lucas Hamilton (DC’01) an attorney at Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney, won the Outstanding Young Lawyer Award at the annual meeting of the Allegheny County Bar Association's Young Lawyers Division on Feb. 27. Read more.

Django Wexler (CS’03), who had an additional major in creative writing, previously worked for CMU in artificial intelligence research and later at Microsoft. Currently, Wexler is a writer living in Seattle. His most recent story is "John Golden: Freelance Debugger." His middle-grade fantasy novel, "The Forbidden Library," will be released on April 15th.

Missy Hammond Dunaway (BHA’10), who is currently in Turkey on a Fulbright Scholarship, recently exhibited her paintings titled "Cities of Silhouettes," with fellow Fulbrighters Vlad Basarab, Galen Gibson-Cornell, Robert Lawrence and Christina Weisman at Staycation Museum in Berlin. Dunaway also had a feather painting included in an auction organized by the Audubon Society of New York to benefit the environmental education programs at the Theodore Roosevelt Sanctuary and Audubon Center in Oyster Bay, Long Island on March 29th. And, she has been awarded an artist residency at Babayan Culture House in Cappadocia, Turkey from May 16 - June 25th. To read a profile on Dunaway from 2013, click here.

Aimee (Bedoy) Murphy (DC’11) was one of four young women leaders will be honored with the Susan B. Anthony Young Leader Award. Read more.

Meela Dudley (DC’13), who is currently pursuing a master’s degree in professional, technical, business and scientific writing in CMU’s English Department, won a $2,000 scholarship from Sigma Tau Delta, the international English honor society.

Dervla McDonnell, a junior fine art and Japanese Studies major has won a second consecutive U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarship (CLS), making her one of the very few to participate in the CLS program for two years in a row. “With an acceptance rate of less than 10 percent, CLS is one of the most prestigious language programs for U.S. citizens,” said Yoshihiro Yasuhara, assistant teaching professor of Japanese Studies. “So receiving the fully-funded scholarship for a second year in a row is quite something, especially since she had never considered Japanese Studies very seriously until she came to CMU.” The State Department’s program is designed to teach students 13 critical foreign languages in an abroad, intensive summer school format, with speaking classes each morning and reading and writing instruction in the afternoons. Learn more about McDonnell.

February 2014

KJ Hannah Greenberg (Karen Joy Ravets) (DC’80) published two books in 2013: “Citrus-Inspired Ceramics,” a poetry collection from Aldrich Press, and “The Immediacy of Emotional Kerfuffles,” a short story collection from Bards and Sages Publishing.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), appointed Daniel Appelquist (DC’91) as co-chair of the W3C’s Technical Architecture Group. The TAG acts as a technical architecture steering board for the W3C and for web standards in general. Read more at http://w3.org/tag.

Rebecca Kluchin (DC’04) will receive Sacramento State’s 2014 President Award for Research and Creative Activity. Kluchin is associate professor of history at Sacramento State and the author of “Fit to Be Tied: Sterilization and Reproductive Rights in America, 1950-1980.” Read more.

Dan Shamash
(DC'08) has been hired as a coach for the NFL’s Jacksonville Jaguars. Read more.

January 2014

Eric A. Segal (DC’80) of New York City is a partner at CFO Consulting Partners, which serves clients with a concentration in banking and financial services, private equity and technology. Segal heads the firm’s Banking and Financial Institutions practice.

Reed Vickerman (DC’83) of La Jolla, CA is COO for Everyone Counts, a global leader in online public and private elections.

Daniel Ritz
(DC’87) is a project manager at 4D Security Solutions, a company that specializes in various aspects of national, perimeter, industrial, transportation and critical infrastructure security.

Kip Jackson (DC’90) of Merrimack, NH is a software solutions engineer for Pegasystems, a global software provider.

Richard Patz (DC’93, ’96) leads all research, development and validation activities associated with ACT, whish is responsible for the ACT test – the college admissions and placement test taken by more than 1.6 million high school graduates every year.

Joshua Baer (DC’99) was selected for the Henry Crown Fellowship at the Aspen Institute. He was also selected as the 2013 Austin Community Leader of the Year by the Entrepreneur’s Foundation.

Zachary Falck (DC’04) published “Weeds: An Environmental History of Metropolitan America.”

Dan Gilman (DC'04), long-time chief of staff for outgoing Pittsburgh City Councilman and now Mayor Bill Peduto, was sworn in as his District 8 predecessor last week (Jan. 6). Gilman represents the residents of Oakland, South Point Breeze, Shadyside and North Squirrel Hill. Since earning his CMU degree in ethics, history and public policy, Gilman has played an integral role in the transformation of the East End, including working on more than $1 billion in economic growth in District 8.

Jack Krawczyk (DC’05), who majored in information systems, was named to Forbes Magazine’s 2014 “30 Under 30” list. Krawczyk is director of product management at Pandora. Read more at http://www.forbes.com/special-report/2014/30-under-30/marketing-and-advertising.html#jack_krawczyk.

Kathy Sutton (DC’07) is working for the new startup publication, Rustbelt Almanac. Sutton also blogs at http://kathyinpittsburgh.wordpress.com/.

Jessie Ramey (DC’09), a visiting scholar in women's studies at the University of Pittsburgh, was profiled in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article “People to know around Pittsburgh in the New Year.” Read more at http://www.post-gazette.com/life/lifestyle/2014/01/07/People-to-know-in-the-New-Year/stories/201401070026.

Sally Wen Mao
(DC’09) is the winner of the Kinereth Gensler Award for her first book of poems, “Mad Honey Symposium.”

Sara Levinson (DC’10) wrote an opinion piece for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette titled, “There's something about Pittsburgh: I live in L.A. now, and it's just not the same.” Read it at http://www.post-gazette.com/opinion/2014/01/26/Something-about-Pittsburgh/stories/201401250015.

November-December 2013

“Twine,” a full-length manuscript by David Koehn (DC’90), won the 2013 May Sarton Poetry Prize and will be published by Bauhan Publishing in Spring 2014.

Phil Simon (DC’93) has announced that his sixth book, “The Visual Organization: Data Visualization, Big Data, and the Quest for Better Decisions,” will be published in February 2014 by John Wiley & Sons. Read more.

Jonathan Barnes (DC’93) blogged about a recent visit with his mentor and former professor, Hilary Masters. Read about it at http://barnestormin.blogspot.com/2013/10/on-mentors.html.

Julie Booth (DC’05) collaborated with CMU Professors Ken Koedinger and David Klahr for a paper published in Science on improving education. Booth, now an assistant professor of educational psychology at Temple University, Koedinger, professor of human-computer interaction, and Klahr, the Walter Van Dyke Bingham Professor of Psychology, offer five recommendations to tame instructional complexity and improve learning outcomes. Read more and watch a video of the researchers discussing the paper.

Yulin Kuang (DC’12) celebrated the online premiere of her award-winning short film, “The Perils of Growing Up Flat-Chested.” Kuang wrote and directed the film about Katya Liu, a sixteen year old girl who is determined to increase her bust size before a study date with her science lab partner. It stars former CMU student James Wolpert, a current contestant on NBC’s The Voice. Watch the film at http://youtu.be/7GT6vVqpGt8.

October 2013

Rosalyn C. (Ryave) Richman (MM'68) retired in June 2013 as director of alumnae relations for the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine program (ELAM) at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia. However, she continues working on limited projects as special assistant to the director. Richman began working with the ELAM program in December 1994, just as it was being launched. The program's 19th class recently got underway and now includes more than 800 graduates in senior-level administrative and faculty positions at medical, dental and public health schools and other institutions in the United States, Canada, and Europe.

Linda Dunne Iannotta (DC’69) received the Allegheny West Civic Council 2013 Neighbor of the Year award. Allegheny West, a historic Pittsburgh neighborhood, offers an eclectic mix of business, housing and entertainment. It’s where Iannotta has operated a gourmet food-catering business and an art gallery and restored two properties. She is married to alumnus Joseph Iannotta.

Ed McClure (DC’71, TPR’72) is the librarian at the Grand Canyon National Park Research Library. Stop by and say hi when you visit the park!

Debbie Zoller (DC’75) is the executive director of the Jewish Family Service of the Lehigh Valley, which is a full-service social service agency providing assistance to all members of the community.

Shari Olefson (DC’85), an attorney-mediator, is a finance and real estate expert often appearing on television shows discussing how Americans can improve their finances. Her new book, “Financial Fresh Start,” offers her five-step plan for improving personal finances. For more, visit http://shariolefson.com/.

LeAnn Neal Reilly (DC’92) has published her third novel, “The Last Stratiote.” The book received five stars from Clarion Review. Read more at https://www.forewordreviews.com/reviews/the-last-stratiote/.

Matthew Kagle
(DC’93) published his first book, a time travel novel titled “Pinhole.”

Roy Wilson (DC’93) has written “Mulling over School and Life,” which uses two different yearbooks from the same high school to consider questions that anyone might ask about success at various points in their life.

Donald Earl Collins
(DC’97) has written “Boy @ The Window,” a memoir of his journey in an emotional and intellectual wilderness before finding his way to the road to rediscover what he had lost as a preteen.

Matthew Bembenick (DC’98, HNZ’99) is an administrative services director in Reading, Pa, where he oversees the finances, budget, accounting, human resources and information technology offices.

Andrew McElwaine
(DC’98), a 30-year leader in the nonprofit conservation world, is now president of American Farmland Trust, a conservation organization dedicated to protecting farmland, promoting sound farming practices and keeping farmers on the land.

Christopher Stratis
(DC’01) is director of marketing and operations for Fino, a New York-based IT consulting firm specializing in enterprise application design, development and consulting services for Fortune 1000 organizations. Christian Jungers (CS’97, ’03, DC’03) is Fino’s CTO. Scott Ziolko (DC’01) is Fino’s director of data science.

Steve Martocci
(DC’04), who co-founded GroupMe, has launched a new music collaboration startup called Splice. Read more at http://allthingsd.com/20131009/groupme-co-founder-steve-martocci-launches-music-collaboration-startup-splice/.

Susan Buchman (DC’06, ’11) is chief data scientist for Management Science Associates, which specializes in developing new methods for the analysis, management and automation of information.

Kevin C. Brown (DC’07, ’12) is the create and host of “History for the Future” interview series for the nonprofit news journal “Remapping Debate.”

Dawn Winters
, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History, has been chosen to present her research at a symposium in honor of CMU President Dr. Subra Suresh's inauguration. Her paper is entitled: "You Can Do It With A Hatchet: Women's Temperance Activism, Liquor Regulation, and Community Politics in the American Midwest, 1850-1874." Read more about Dawn Winters at http://www.hss.cmu.edu/pressreleases/pressreleases/dawnwinters.html.

Ashlie Henery
, a current Ph.D. candidate in Second Language Acquisition in the Department of Modern Languages, is the recipient of the Barbara F. Freed Award for Research on Language Learning in a Study Abroad Context. The award will support work on her dissertation, “Interpreting ‘Real’ French: The Role of Expert Mediation in Learners’ Observations, Understandings, and Use of Pragmatic Practices While Abroad.” Henery also received the 2013-14 Chateaubriand Fellowship in the Humanities and Social Sciences, awarded by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy.

September 2013

In May, Bart Astor (DC’69) published his 13th book, “AARP Roadmap for the Rest of Your Life.” The book provides guidance and solutions for retirees. It includes tips and strategies for creating and realizing goals, making lifestyle decisions, growing nest eggs and taking advantage of the new opportunities at age 50+. It spent more than a month as the as #1 book on Amazon's Retirement Planning list.

Jonathan Barnes (DC’93) was part of a team of writers who won third place from the American Society of Business Publication Editors for their series on bullying stories. Barnes’ piece was titled “Tell Bullies to Step Off” and can be read at http://enr.construction.com/opinions/viewpoint/2012/1126-when-abuse-had-no-limits.asp#!.

Ashlie Henery
, a current Ph.D. candidate in Second Language Acquisition, is the recipient of the Barbara F. Freed Award for Research on Language Learning in a Study Abroad Context to support work on her dissertation, “Interpreting ‘Real’ French: The Role of Expert Mediation in Learners’ Observations, Understandings, and Use of Pragmatic Practices While Abroad.” Henery also received the 2013-14 Chateaubriand Fellowship in the Humanities and Social Sciences, awarded by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy.

August 2013

James O’Donnell (DC’78) was selected as the new dean of the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the State University of New York at Buffalo (aka The University at Buffalo). Read more.

Chequeta Allen (DC’85) left her position at Stanford as assistant dean of postdoctoral affairs and, since March 2009, has been senior director, industry marketing for global healthcare and life sciences in the Industries Business Unit at Oracle Corporation. She is based at Oracle Headquarters in Redwood Shores, CA.

Roy Wilson (DC’93) published a new book, “Mulling Over School and Life: Some Will Win, Some Will Lose (and Some are Born to Sing the Blues). For more information, visit https://www.createspace.com/4185458.

Pamelyn (Klepal) Shefman (DC’95) joined the University of Houston’s Division of Student Affairs and Enrollment Services as the director of assessment and planning. Shefman brings more than 15 years of experience in Student Affairs work to the position. Previously, She served as the coordinator of the BEST START program and as an adjunct faculty member for the First Year College Success course at Lone Star College–CyFair.

In April, Alison Merikangas (DC’00), who majored in psychology, was awarded her Ph.D. in Neuropsychiatric Genetics from Trinity College Dublin, in Dublin Ireland. Merikangas investigated the role of copy number variation in the phenotypic presentation of autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. She continues to live in Dublin and is working as a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Psychiatry at Trinity College Dublin.

Lisa Kwon (DC’13) accepted a job at Creative Artists Agency, which, in her opinion, “opened my eyes to my dream career path.”

The Chinese Language Teachers Association Research Award Committee awarded Wenhao Diao (DC’13) the Jiede Empirical Research Grant for her proposal entitled, “Writing to Build Shi: Chinese Learners’ Rhetoric Structure as Cultural Praxis.”

July 2013

Gary Cirrincione (DC’75) is an architect who has designed customer service centers all over the United States, worked on remodeling projects for Pittsburgh Public Schools and served as project architect for the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Acquarium.

Jewell Parker Rhodes (DC’75,’76,’79), the author of “Ninth Ward” (a Coretta Scott King Honor Book and a Today show Al's Book Club for Kids pick), has written another tale of a strong, spirited young girl who rises beyond her circumstances: “Sugar" (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, 2013). Rhodes teaches creative writing at Arizona State University.

Doug Zimmerman (DC’77) is general manager of food and beverage at the Music City Center in Nashville. He is also a chef and cookbook co-author.

Lenwood C. Davis
(DC’79) has written “Selected Writings and Speeches of James E. Shepard, 1896-1946: Founder of North Carolina Central University” (Farleigh Dickinson, 2012). Davis is a retired professor of history at Winston-Salem State University.

Richard Genece (DC’87) is vice president of energy efficiency for the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland, Ore.

Jessie B. Ramey
(DC’90) wrote a piece for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on how when she decided to write a dissertation on Pittsburgh’s old orphanages, she didn’t know the subject would hit so close to home. Read “How an orphanage kept my ancestors together."

Michael Gordon Shapiro (DC’93) and Gregory Crafts’ musical, “Super Sidekick: The Musical,” was published by Samuel French, Inc. The show premiered at the Los Angeles Festival of New American Musicals in 2010, then enjoyed kudos at Fringe festivals in Hollywood and New York City.

Statistics Professor Christopher Genovese and Scott Berry (DC'94) have been elected fellows of the American Statistical Association (ASA) for outstanding professional contributions to, and leadership in the field of statistical science. Genovese is being recognized for fundamentally important contributions to statistical theory and methodology and their applications to diverse scientific problems; for using scientific problems to inspire new statistical theory; for innovation in statistical pedagogy and for service to the ASA. Berry is being honored for outstanding contributions to innovative design and analysis of clinical trials, including a highly regarded textbook and an award-winning ASA short course; for excellence in the development and dissemination of Bayesian methods with applications in medicine and sports; for mentoring others in the statistical science community; and for service to the ASA. Read more.

Jonathan L. Silver (DC’95, ’04) is headmaster at Maui Preparatory Academy in Hawaii.

Susan Cribbs (DC’00, ’06), former communications manager in Carnegie Mellon’s Data Storage Systems Center and Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, left CMU to become manager of Web communications for Duquesne University's Office of Public Affairs. Cribbs was formerly the associate director of Internal Communications at Carnegie Mellon and is an active volunteer for CMU's Kiltie Band.

Thomas Sweterlitsch
(DC’00, ’01) has accepted a two-book deal from Putnam. The first book, "Tomorrow and Tomorrow," is a science fiction thriller set to be released summer 2014. The second book will be another science fiction novel.

Dan Gilman (DC’04) won the election to represent residents of the 8th City Council District of Pittsburgh.

Ann Lyon Ritchie (DC’05) received the 2012 Staff Recognition Award from CMU’s College of Engineering. She has worked at CMU in a communications role for six years at the Information Networking Institute and Cylab.

Kevin Cohn (DC’06) is COO at Atypon, which provides software for publishers. Cohn is responsible for all of the company’s client operations and business development and administration.

Adam Lazarus (DC’06) and History Professor Steven Schlossman offer their observations of what many experts still consider to be the greatest round of golf ever played in "Fact, Fancy and Johnny Miller's 63 in the 1973 U.S. Open at Oakmont." Schlossman and Lazarus constructed the retrospective from their hit 2010 book "Chasing Greatness: Johnny Miller, Arnold Palmer and the Miracle at Oakmont," which tells the story of how Miller upstaged the greats of golf's golden era — Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, Lee Trevino and others — to come from behind to win by a single stroke with a record-setting score. Read more.

Elizabeth Rosen (DC’06) works as a financial writer for numerous websites and print newsletters.

Alisa (DC’07) and Scott Kuppe (DC’08) opened a Soccer Shots franchise, a national chain of soccer clinics, bringing equipment and coaches together in public gatherings for young children who want to learn soccer.

Jay Roszman
(DC’10) was awarded the first annual Emmet Larkin Research Fellowship from the American Conference for Irish Studies. The fellowship is "given to a Ph.D. student conducting work in Irish history... at a North American Institution."

James Bursley
(DC'12), a researcher in the Department of Psychology and Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, wrote a blog post on his recent brain imaging research that he conducted with Psychology Professor David Creswell. The piece, “The Unconscious Mind at Work,” focuses on how the brain uses unconscious thought processes to make decisions. Read the blog.

Sarah Ceurvorst (BHA'13) is the winner of Judy G. Cheteyan Scholarship at Pittsburgh’s Society for Contemporary Craft. The scholarship allows an arts-management student to learn Contemporary Craft's operations, from fundraising, marketing and how to run the organization's retail store to education, administration and exhibitions, which this year will be "ENOUGH Violence – Artists Speak Out." Read more.

Kate Fuhrman (DC’13) received a Critical Language Scholarship (CLS), sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the U.S. Department of State. She will travel to Dushanbe, Tajikistan, for two months to participate in an intensive overseas summer language institute studying Persian (Farsi).

CMU’s radio station WRCT-FM (88.3) drew on its loyal cult following recently to win the intercollegiate radio competition Soundtap Madness 2013, which calculated station listening time over 12 days. Allison Cosby (DC’14) is the station’s general manager and talks about the win in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Second semester M.A. in Professional Writing (MAPW) student Matthew Liner has been awarded the Peter C. Dozzi Internship Initiative Scholarship for the summer of 2013. The scholarship money is made available through the Carnegie Mellon Career and Professional Development Center for students who will be staying in the Pittsburgh Region to complete a summer internship experience, as an incentive to keep Carnegie Mellon talent in and around the Pittsburgh Region. Read more.

Gwendolyn Jones (E’16) is the third generation of women in her family to attend CMU. She joins her mother, Patricia Bruckman Jones (DC’81), and grandmother Marilyn Mullen Bruckman (MM’56).

April 2013

Peggy Herre Morrissette (DC’70) sang in the choir for the world premier of “Our Favorite Things: The Music of Rodgers and Hammerstein” and for “A Celtic Christmas.” She was also a featured back-up singer for “Heartbreak Hotel: A Tribute to Elvis Presley,” all performed at the Flat Rock Playhouse, the state theater of North Carolina.

Stephen Schillo (DC’95, HNZ’78) is vice president of finance and administration at the State University of New York at Fredonia.

David Kanner
(DC’76) is the city administrator for Ashland, Ore., a cultural hub and home of the world-renowned Oregon Shakespeare Festival and Southern Oregon University.

Deborah Lafky
(DC’77) serves as a department chair and assistant dean at the University of South Alabama College of Medicine in Mobile. There, she directs the Center for Strategic Health Innovation, which is charged with applying healthcare information technology to improve medical outcomes and reduce cost. In February, Lafky received a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation under which she and her team will develop and test a predictive model of premature birth.

To honor the memory of Jeffrey L. Zaslow (DC’80) – a best-selling author and longtime Wall Street Journal columnist, Carnegie Mellon University unveiled a new plaque and announced a scholarship program in his name. Zaslow, who majored in creative writing within the Dietrich College’s Department of English, may be best remembered at Carnegie Mellon for co-authoring "The Last Lecture" with the late CMU Computer Science Professor Randy Pausch. The plaque, revealed at a private ceremony during Spring Carnival, fittingly faces a plaque for Pausch on “The Pausch Bridge." The “Jeffrey L. Zaslow Scholarship for Writing Students,” made possible by gifts from several of Zaslow’s friends and admirers, was also announced. Read more.

Dana S. Dunn (DC’82) has received the 2013 Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology from the American Psychological Foundation, the philanthropic branch of the American Psychological Association (APA). Dunn is a professor of psychology and assistant dean for special projects at Moravian College. Read more at http://www.moravian.edu/default.aspx?pageid=6106.

Richard Genece (DC’87) is vice president of energy efficiency at Bonneville Power Administration, which is a nonprofit federal agency that markets renewable hydropower from federal dams, operates high-voltage transmission lines and funds a wildlife preservation program.

Michael Neiberg (DC’92, ’96) has written the historical nonfiction book “The Blood of Free Men: The Liberation of Paris, 1944.”

Joshua Wisch (DC’97, HNZ’97) is deputy director of Hawaii’s Department of Taxation.

Katie Martinez (DC’00) recently earned her Ph.D. in health services research and policy from Johns Hopkins. She is now completing a fellowship at the University of Michigan.

Faith Hall (DC'02) and graduate student Riley Ohlson (HNZ'13) have been named Robert Bosch Foundation Fellows. The fellowship program is designed to provide young American leaders with a yearlong professional exchange program in Germany and the European Union. Following an intensive language instruction period in their hometowns, the fellows will spend the summer in Berlin receiving group language training. In September, they will begin a series of three professional seminars across Europe and two work assignments at leading German institutions. Read more.

Jeffrey Miecznikowski
(DC’02, ’06), associate professor of biostatistics at the University of Buffalo, has been named the associate dean for faculty affairs and diversity at the university’s School of Public Health.

Vivienne Ming (DC’03, ’06) was named one of 2013’s “10 Women to Watch in Tech” by Inc. Magazine. Ming is co-founder of the educational technology company Socos, a theoretical neuroscientist at UC Berkley’s Redwood Center for Theoretical Neuroscience and chief scientist at the startup Gild. Read more at http://www.hss.cmu.edu/pressreleases/pressreleases/vivienneming.html.

Kai Wu (DC’04) is a writer for the new NBC show “Hannibal.” Read more.

Andres Bermudez Hallstrom (DC’06) was elected to the board of trustees of the Village of Mamaroneck, where he serves as one of five legislators for the village.

March 2013

Edward M. "Ted" McClure (DC’71, TPR'72) is now the Librarian at the Grand Canyon National Park Research Library.

Meg Brindle (DC’92) has found her dream job helping former African child soldiers succeed in business. Read more at http://www.hss.cmu.edu/pressreleases/pressreleases/megbrindle.html.

Doug Heckmann (DC’13), Anthony Lorubbio (DC’13) and Casey Parzych (E’14) launched Midnight Madness Distilling last year during an undergraduate entrepreneurship class. Their company's vodka, Fortis, is distilled from fair-trade, organic sugar cane. Read more at http://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/cmu-students-launch-new-liquor-label/Content?oid=1625999.

Madelyn Glymour (DC’13) won the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) Alliance for Family Entertainment's (AFE) Search for America's Newest Screenwriter Contest. Glymour, who received the top honor in the college category for her script titled "Nuclear," was awarded a $2,500 cash prize. Read more at http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2013/march/march6_screenwriter.html.

Kimberly Josephson (DC’13) presented her senior honors thesis at the Walsh Exchange, an undergraduate research conference on international relations. Read more at http://www.hss.cmu.edu/pressreleases/pressreleases/walshexchange.html.

February 2013

Phil Simon (DC'93) has published his fifth book, “Too Big to Ignore: The Business Case for Big Data.” Read more about it in this Alum Q&A.

Hollen Barmer (DC’01), who received her MAPW from CMU and currently works as a writer/editor for the Software Engineering Institute, has been featured in several Pittsburgh news outlets for using Google Maps to create a detailed Lenten fish fry map for western Pennsylvania. Read about it in the Tribune Review at http://triblive.com/news/allegheny/3473396-74/fish-map-fries#ixzz2KyGd72UC.

Pauline Law (DC’07, TPR’07), who majored in economics and Chinese, is an associate at the law firm Gravel & Shea, PC in Burlington, Vermont. She specializes in corporate and commercial transactions, and tax, trust and estate planning.

Molly Shanley (DC’15), co-chair of Greek Sing and vice president of recruitment for the Panhellenic community, talks about Greek Sing’s goal to raise $60,000 for the Children's Institute of Pittsburgh: http://www.hercampus.com/school/cmu/greek-sing-chair-molly-shanley.

January 2013

Norma Hassel Hammerberg (MM'55) is proud to announce that her grandson is now the 3rd generation of her family to attend Carnegie Mellon. Stowe Hammarberg is a freshman in the Industrial Design Department. Her father, Clyde L. Hassel, graduated from the Engineering Department in 1926.

Caroline Bozic Pipich (DC’70) has retired from teaching and resides in Pittsburgh.

Thomas Croak (DC’78) recently retired as the director of student legal services at DePaul University. He previously retired from the faculty in 2005. During his 35-year career with the university, he held numerous positions, including associate vice president/dean of students, chair of the History Department and associate vice president for development.

Jeffrey Cohen (DC’90) was re-elected to his sixth term as treasurer of Beth Joshua Congregation, a mod����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������C/strong> (DC '06) is now the acquisitions editor for politics and international relations at Bloomsbury Academic.

Michael Fitzgerald (DC’09) has been promoted to associate editor at Pacific Standard Magazine, a new bi-monthly print and online news magazine covering politics, health, economy, culture, and the environment. He has previously written for The New Republic.

Kerrin Sheldon (DC’10) is looking to change how travel content is both created and viewed. Sheldon, who received his master's degree in art and professional writing, created Humanity.TV as an interactive short-documentary series that tells the authentic stories of locals across the world. Read more about the project.

November 2012

Sheryl F. Kelsey (DC’78), the first woman to be awarded a Ph.D. in statistics from Carnegie Mellon University, retired from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, following an illustrious career in epidemiology. Read more at http://www.upmc.com/media/NewsReleases/2012/Pages/Epidemiologist-Retires-Public-Health.aspx.

Susan (La Fiandra) Reid (DC’90) was recently inducted into the Delta Mu Delta business honor society at Marymount University where she will complete her MBA in Spring 2013. An administrator at the American Society of Civil Engineers, she works with Technical Committees of the Structural Engineering Institute.

Amy Buxbaum (DC '92) has been named president of the Tartan Athletics Club Board of Directors. Read more.

Phil Simon (DC’93) is working on a book on big data. This will be his fifth book.

Michael Szczerban (DC’07) has been promoted to editor at the book publisher Simon & Schuster. .

Yulin Kuang (DC’12) premiered her 2012 Steeltown Film Factory winning short film, “The Perils of Growing Up Flat-Chested,” on Monday Nov. 5 at the Regent Square Theater. Part of the Three Rivers Film Festival. Kuang also participated on a panel of past Film Factory finalists.

Senior Professional Writing major Anna Walsh was named a finalist in the Opinion/Editorial category of the Associated Collegiate Press Print Story of the Year competition. Walsh wrote “Panera Bread’s racist, sexist practices warrant boycott" for the Dec. 5, 2011, edition of The Tartan.

October 2012

Cynthia Courtney (DC’76) is VP of Discovery Engineering at D4, a national leader in litigation support and eDiscovery services to law firms and corporate law departments.

Jon McGraw (DC’79) is VP of Operations for HUB International. The company is the largest privately held broker in the United States and is ranked among the 10 largest insurance brokers in the world.

Yung H. Chung (E’84, DC’14) is managing director at AlixPartners, which us a global business-advisory firm offering enterprise improvement, turn-around and restructuring, financial and information-management services.

Stephen Catanzarite
(DC’90) is CEO of Baden Academy Charter School in Beaver, PA. The school plans to open this fall for students in kindergarten through third grade.

Elizabeth Gross
(DC’90) is marketing director of Mad Pow design agency. She is responsible for the marketing, public relations and social media for Mad Pow offices in Boston; Portsmouth, NH; and Louisville, KY.

Richard Shipley (DC’90) is director of marketing at DartAppraisal.com, which is an appraisal management company that was founded in 1933.

Jessie Ramey (DC’90) has written “Child Care in Black and White: Working Parents and the History of Orphanages” which was published by the University of Illinois Press. It examines institutional child care from 1878 to 1929 and the role racial segregation played in child welfare policies.

Yamam Fadl (DC’96) is a member of the Sanctions Compliance and Evaluation team at the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Asses Control. She plays a key role in the financial war against international terrorists and narcotics traffickers by providing advice to financial institutions on OFAC compliance issues.

Kevin Byrne (DC’97) is the head coach of the Ohio Northern University Polar Bears men’s basketball divisional III program.

Kristen Williams (DC’98), a concert pianist, recently performed “He Loved the Soft Porn of the City” during the Montreal and Washington, D.C. Fringe Festivals. She co-wrote this piece based on her collaborations with Danish punk opera composer Morten Skovgaard Danielsen.

Justin Coslor (DC’01) has self-published the book “Possibility Thinking: Explorations in Logic and Thought and Math Patterns, Volume #1.”

Justin Kulla (DC’03) is VP of Investments at Weld North, a venture capital and growth equity firm that concentrates on education, health and wellness, consumer services and marketing businesses.

Frances Ruiz (DC’05) has written her second novel on fairies, titled “Fairy Bond (The Key to Embralia, Book Two).”

Erica Nurnberg (DC’06) earned an MS in public and international affairs from Pitt and is now on staff at the Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs in Washington, D.C.

Jessica Dickinson Goodman (DC’11) presented for the sixth time at the Grace Hopper Celebrating Women in Computing conference. This year, she gave a presentation on “Using Technology to Lower the Cost of Being a Woman.”

September 2012

Arthur D. Nelson (DC’71, A/74), launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds to make "Cloud Tribe," a 100-minute narrative film for the Internet that will be shown in seven-minute webisodes. Read more.

Patrick Moore (DC’85, A’85), director of development at The Andy Warhol Museum since 2011, was promoted to deputy director effective Sept. 1. Read more.

Edward (Ed) Costello (DC'91) is now Manager, Technical Writing at 10gen, Inc., which develops MongoDB, and offers production support, training, and consulting for the open source database.

Stephanie Hubka
(DC’05) has been named the director of learning management systems for Communities In Schools. The organization works in nearly 2,700 schools in the most challenged communities in 24 states and the District of Columbia.

August 2012

Jessie B. Ramey (DC’09) was invited back to the White House this month. She attended a special “Education Forum with Pennsylvania Leaders” hosted by the White House and the U.S. Department of Education. The group mett with President Obama’s senior administration officials to discuss “education programs and initiatives, including specific conversations about K-12, higher education and other focus areas.” Ramey was previously at the White House earlier this year for an education policy briefing. Ramey is a public education advocate involved with the grassroots organization Yinzercation.

Brad Walker (DC ’12) has won the 2012 Erwin R. Steinberg Main Professional Writing (MAPW) Scholarship. The $1,500 scholarship was established in 2007 as a tribute to Steinberg, the longtime English professor who also was the first dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, now the Dietrich College. It is awarded annually to a third-semester MAPW student who excels in Style, a course Steinberg taught for many years in the MAPW program. The winner also must show the integrity, intellectual curiosity and citizenship that Steinberg displayed while founding and developing the MAPW program over his long career at Carnegie Mellon. For more information, visit http://www.cmu.edu/hss/english/news/2012/brad-walker-receives-steinberg-award.html.

July 2012

Saul Carliner (DC’80) published “Informal Learning Basics,” a new book on informal learning.

Evan J. Segal (DC’82) wrote “From Local To Global: Smart Management Lessons to Grow Your Business.” The book provides business owners and executives with invaluable lessons learned based on the hands-on experience of a successful business leader. It offers knowledge and wisdom that will help managers grow their business, create jobs and navigate the challenging environment that they face in today’s global economy.

Ken Koedinger (DC'90), professor in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute and director of the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center, will present the keynote address, “Bridging the Gap Between Psychological Science and Educational Practice,” at the American Psychological Association annual conference Aug. 2 in Orlando, Fla. His speech will outline potential rifts between research and classroom practice and discuss how principles of learning can be applied and tested in controlled experiments in schools.

Susan (La Fiandra) Reid (DC’90) is in the MBA program at Marymount University, expecting to complete her degree by Spring 2013. An Administrator at the American Society of Civil Engineers, she works with Technical Committees of the Structural Engineering Institute.

Andrew “Andy” Marshall
(DC’92) recently earned his MBA at Florida State University, studying part-time while also serving full-time as an active duty officer in the U.S. Navy.

Ivan Schneider (DC’92) recently graduated from Harvard University with a Master of Liberal Arts in Extension Studies degree with a concentration in Foreign Literature, Language and Culture.

Academic Studies Press published a new book by Shirli Brautbar (DC’94) titled “From Fashion to Politics: Hadassah and Jewish American Women in the Post World War II Era."

Effective August 1, 2012, Marsha Lovett (DC’94) will become the Director of the Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence at Carnegie Mellon. Lovett earned her Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology, and after serving as a Visiting Scholar at the University of California at Berkeley, she returned to Carnegie Mellon and joined the Psychology Department as an assistant professor. Her research focused on learning, memory, and problem solving, and she developed computational models of strategy selection, skill acquisition, and working memory. Over time, her work turned toward applying these models to real-world learning situations and translating that theory into educational practice.

Kevin Gaughen
(DC’03) partnered with his former college roommate Tobin Coziahr (CS’00) to found Gaughen-Coziahr, a real estate investment firm with a niche market in data-driven analysis of income-producing real estate.

Ryan Spector (DC’05) is a senior associate of CBRE’s New York City Investment Properties Institutional Group. Among the 2011 transactions in which Spector participated was the $485 million sale of 750 Seventh Avenue.

Jacob Blish (DC’07) is vice president of marketing for Enertia Beverage, a startup company. Enertia Beverage produces Vital Energy, a vitamin-B enhanced, caffeinated energy drink.

Michael Szczerban (DC’07), associate editor at Simon & Schuster, has won the 2012 Ashmead Award. The award is “designed to nurture the career of a promising young editor in the field of book publishing,” in honor of editor Larry Ashmead’s history of mentoring young editors. Szczerban started at S&S in 2007 as an assistant managing editor and moved into editorial in 2009. His projects include “Two Gentlemen of Lebowski,” “Paula Deen’s Southern Cooking Bible,” and “Courage and Consequence.”

Lesley Ridge (DC’08, ’09) is content/community manager for Boston-based 360 Public Relations. She works alongside the agency’s team of interactive designers and client teams to develop digital and social media strategies; build, integrate and enhance online channels; and create and implement content calendars.

Yulin Kuang (DC'12) took the $15,000 first prize at the 2012 Steeltown Film Factory Competition this past weekend. Kuang’s script, titled “Perils of Growing Up Flat Chested,” is a screenplay about a high school girl named Katya. “This is a story I feel particularly compelled to tell, mostly because 16-year-old me needs to hear it,” Kuang told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. “Something I couldn’t have known then was that the horrible agonies of adolescence would be useful to me in a few years; that insecurities I had about my chest size, my acne, my total lack of coolness could be exploited for the sake of comedy and screenwriting.” Kuang will use the prize money this summer to make her short film.

April 2012

Ralph Sherman (DC’83) has opened a law office in Saint Clair Shores, Mich., which specializes in working with business owners regarding securities offerings, corporate entity information, trust formation and other legal issues.

Christine Klocek-Lim
(DC'91) published her fourth poetry collection, "Ballroom - a love story" (Flutter Press) in March 2012. Selections from it are forthcoming in Diode. In April 2012, Klocek-Lim hosted an interview series at November Sky Poetry in conjunction with Upper Rubber Boot Books. Interviews included: Neil Aitken, John Amen, Steve Bunch, Ayesha Chatterjee, Jim Daniels, O.P.W. Fredericks, Darla Govan, David Landrum, Oliver de la Paz, Abbas Raza, Catherine Rogers, Hannah Stephenson, Lizzy Swane, Donna Vorreyer, and Karen Weyant.

Phil Simon (DC’93), a four-time author, has a new book out titled, “The Age of the Platform: How Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google Have Redefined Business.” For more information, visit www.theageoftheplatform.com.

Dale Usner (DC’93) is vice president of biostatistics for Statistics & Data Corp. He is responsible for overseeing the operations of SDC’s biostatistics team, as well as providing leadership in the continued growth and evolution of SDC as a top-tier provider of biostatistics and data management services.

Smita Lal (DC’99) created an audio storytelling website called “Bedtime Kahani,” which shares children’s stories from India in a new and imaginative way. She researches and writes each story to depict leadership values for children and maintains an authentic voice of Indian/international culture.

The American Theatre Critics Association (ATCA) announced Darren M. Canady (DC’04) as recipient of its 2012 M. Elizabeth Osborn New Play Award for an emerging playwright. The award will be presented at ATCA's June conference in Chicago. Read more at http://www.playbill.com/news/article/161201-Playwright-Darren-M-Canady-Wins-Theatre-Critics-Osborn-Award.

Chad Pehrson (DC’05) is an associate at the law firm Parr Brown Gee & Loveless. He specializes in commercial litigation, including intellectual property disputes, patent-infringement claims, securities litigation, healthcare litigation, antitrust suits and government investigations.

Jeffrey Liebner (DC’03, ’09) joined the mathematics department at Lafayette College as an assistant professor. A statistics specialist, he has an extensive knowledge of the R/s-plus statistical program, and his research has been published in the Journal of Statistical Software.

Jessie B. Ramey (DC’09) was recently invited to the White House for a policy briefing. The President’s Office of Public Engagement invited 150 community leaders from Pennsylvania to the White House. Ramey, who was chosen because of her grassroots education advocacy involvement with Yinzercation, and the other participants received an economic briefing from the NEC, met with White House staff on special issues of concern, spoke at a listening session with Jon Carson, director of the White House Office of Public Engagement, participated in policy breakout sessions and had a tour of the White House.

Juan Acosta (DC’15), who is majoring in professional writing, was recently interviewed by NBC’s Andrea Mitchell about his study abroad semester in Havana, Cuba. Watch the interview at http://video.msnbc.msn.com/mitchell-reports/46858619/#46858588.

March 2012

“Baby Boomer's Guide to Caring for Aging Parents” by Bart Astor (DC’69) was published in November 2011 and is now available electronically. The book offers a step-by-step guide that explains what you need to do as you see your parents age. For more information, visit http://www.babyboomereldercare.com/.

Tony Peffer
(DC’89) has been promoted to academic dean of Castleton State College in Vermont.

Mackenzie Evan Smith (DC’11) wrote an article for the Pittsburgh City Paper about a work-study position she fulfilled at an after-school program for children from low-income homes. Read it at http://www.pittsburghcitypaper.ws/pittsburgh/extra-credit/Content?oid=1499573.

February 2012

After more than 20 years, Marc Field (DC'73) has left The Center for Theater Arts to become Executive Director at The First Tee of Pittsburgh and operate The Bob O'Connor Golf Course in Schenley Park, adjacent to CMU. The course is already hosting the CMU Golf team and a group of golfers from Tepper School. All CMU students, faculty and staff receive a discount on golf.

Lt. Col. Jeffrey A. Collins
(DC’03) has been awarded a Bronze Star Medal for his leadership and success while deployed in Afghanistan. Collins is currently an assistant professor of English at the U.S. Air Force Academy. Read more at http://www.usafa.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123289713.

January 2012

Raymond Martino (DC’69) of Voorhees, N.J. is president of the Ocean Marine Business Unit for The Travelers Companies, a provider of property casualty insurance for auto, home and business.

Leonard Hayes (DC’71) of Baton Rouge, L.A. was listed in the book “From Excellence to Eminence: 100 Years of African American Achievement at The Ohio State University.” He is the senior director of the U.S. Department of Education/OPE/IS.

Judy Johnston (DC’72) accepted an appointment as chairwoman of the board of directors of A+ Schools, an independent, nonprofit education watchdog dedicated to improving achievement among public-school students in Pittsburgh. Read more.

Phil Simon (DC’93) has written his fourth book, “The Age of the Platform.” Read more.

Jennifer (Desmond) Wilson (DC’94) is president and CEO of the First Community Foundation Partnership of Pennsylvania. The foundation manages $68 million in assets and awards grants of more than $2 million annually to charitable causes.

Amy (Lefkowitz) Lawrence (DC’95) and husband Brian Lawrence welcome their second child into the world. Emma Shae Lawrence was born November 23rd, 2011 at 8:30pm.

Adam Lazarus
(DC’06) published his first solo-authored book, “Super Bowl Monday: The New York Giants, the Buffalo Bills and Super Bowl XXV.” He is also the co-author (with CMU History Professor Steven Schlossman) of “Chasing Greatness: Johnny Miller, Arnold Palmer and the Miracle at Oakmont.”

Erica Cherry (DC’12), an English major, had her final paper for Law, Culture and the Humanities accepted for publication in the Washington Undergraduate Law Review. Cherry’s paper is titled “Law and Libraries: An Exploration of Library Privacy.”

December 2012

Abraham Kabakoff (DC’01) was recently promoted to head pilot brewer for the R&D Brewery at Sierra Nevada Brewing Company in Chico, California.

Matthew Kopel (DC '06) is now the acquisitions editor for politics and international relations at Bloomsbury Academic.

Michael Fitzgerald (DC’09) has been promoted to associate editor at Pacific Standard Magazine, a new bi-monthly print and online news magazine covering politics, health, economy, culture, and the environment. He has previously written for The New Republic.

Kerrin Sheldon (DC’10) is looking to change how travel content is both created and viewed. Sheldon, who received his master's degree in art and professional writing, created Humanity.TV as an interactive short-documentary series that tells the authentic stories of locals across the world. Read more about the project.

November 2012

Sheryl F. Kelsey (DC’78), the first woman to be awarded a Ph.D. in statistics from Carnegie Mellon University, retired from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, following an illustrious career in epidemiology. Read more at http://www.upmc.com/media/NewsReleases/2012/Pages/Epidemiologist-Retires-Public-Health.aspx.

Susan (La Fiandra) Reid (DC’90) was recently inducted into the Delta Mu Delta business honor society at Marymount University where she will complete her MBA in Spring 2013. An administrator at the American Society of Civil Engineers, she works with Technical Committees of the Structural Engineering Institute.

Amy Buxbaum (DC '92) has been named president of the Tartan Athletics Club Board of Directors. Read more.

Phil Simon (DC’93) is working on a book on big data. This will be his fifth book.

Michael Szczerban (DC’07) has been promoted to editor at the book publisher Simon & Schuster. .

Yulin Kuang (DC’12) premiered her 2012 Steeltown Film Factory winning short film, “The Perils of Growing Up Flat-Chested,” on Monday Nov. 5 at the Regent Square Theater. Part of the Three Rivers Film Festival. Kuang also participated on a panel of past Film Factory finalists.

Senior Professional Writing major Anna Walsh was named a finalist in the Opinion/Editorial category of the Associated Collegiate Press Print Story of the Year competition. Walsh wrote “Panera Bread’s racist, sexist practices warrant boycott" for the Dec. 5, 2011, edition of The Tartan.

October 2012

Cynthia Courtney (DC’76) is VP of Discovery Engineering at D4, a national leader in litigation support and eDiscovery services to law firms and corporate law departments.

Jon McGraw (DC’79) is VP of Operations for HUB International. The company is the largest privately held broker in the United States and is ranked among the 10 largest insurance brokers in the world.

Yung H. Chung (E’84, DC’14) is managing director at AlixPartners, which us a global business-advisory firm offering enterprise improvement, turn-around and restructuring, financial and information-management services.

Stephen Catanzarite
(DC’90) is CEO of Baden Academy Charter School in Beaver, PA. The school plans to open this fall for students in kindergarten through third grade.

Elizabeth Gross
(DC’90) is marketing director of Mad Pow design agency. She is responsible for the marketing, public relations and social media for Mad Pow offices in Boston; Portsmouth, NH; and Louisville, KY.

Richard Shipley (DC’90) is director of marketing at DartAppraisal.com, which is an appraisal management company that was founded in 1933.

Jessie Ramey (DC’90) has written “Child Care in Black and White: Working Parents and the History of Orphanages” which was published by the University of Illinois Press. It examines institutional child care from 1878 to 1929 and the role racial segregation played in child welfare policies.

Yamam Fadl (DC’96) is a member of the Sanctions Compliance and Evaluation team at the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Asses Control. She plays a key role in the financial war against international terrorists and narcotics traffickers by providing advice to financial institutions on OFAC compliance issues.

Kevin Byrne (DC’97) is the head coach of the Ohio Northern University Polar Bears men’s basketball divisional III program.

Kristen Williams (DC’98), a concert pianist, recently performed “He Loved the Soft Porn of the City” during the Montreal and Washington, D.C. Fringe Festivals. She co-wrote this piece based on her collaborations with Danish punk opera composer Morten Skovgaard Danielsen.

Justin Coslor (DC’01) has self-published the book “Possibility Thinking: Explorations in Logic and Thought and Math Patterns, Volume #1.”

Justin Kulla (DC’03) is VP of Investments at Weld North, a venture capital and growth equity firm that concentrates on education, health and wellness, consumer services and marketing businesses.

Frances Ruiz (DC’05) has written her second novel on fairies, titled “Fairy Bond (The Key to Embralia, Book Two).”

Erica Nurnberg (DC’06) earned an MS in public and international affairs from Pitt and is now on staff at the Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs in Washington, D.C.

Jessica Dickinson Goodman (DC’11) presented for the sixth time at the Grace Hopper Celebrating Women in Computing conference. This year, she gave a presentation on “Using Technology to Lower the Cost of Being a Woman.”

September 2012

Arthur D. Nelson (DC’71, A/74), launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds to make "Cloud Tribe," a 100-minute narrative film for the Internet that will be shown in seven-minute webisodes. Read more.

Patrick Moore (DC’85, A’85), director of development at The Andy Warhol Museum since 2011, was promoted to deputy director effective Sept. 1. Read more.

Edward (Ed) Costello (DC'91) is now Manager, Technical Writing at 10gen, Inc., which develops MongoDB, and offers production support, training, and consulting for the open source database.

Stephanie Hubka
(DC’05) has been named the director of learning management systems for Communities In Schools. The organization works in nearly 2,700 schools in the most challenged communities in 24 states and the District of Columbia.

August 2012

Jessie B. Ramey (DC’09) was invited back to the White House this month. She attended a special “Education Forum with Pennsylvania Leaders” hosted by the White House and the U.S. Department of Education. The group mett with President Obama’s senior administration officials to discuss “education programs and initiatives, including specific conversations about K-12, higher education and other focus areas.” Ramey was previously at the White House earlier this year for an education policy briefing. Ramey is a public education advocate involved with the grassroots organization Yinzercation.

Brad Walker (DC ’12) has won the 2012 Erwin R. Steinberg Main Professional Writing (MAPW) Scholarship. The $1,500 scholarship was established in 2007 as a tribute to Steinberg, the longtime English professor who also was the first dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, now the Dietrich College. It is awarded annually to a third-semester MAPW student who excels in Style, a course Steinberg taught for many years in the MAPW program. The winner also must show the integrity, intellectual curiosity and citizenship that Steinberg displayed while founding and developing the MAPW program over his long career at Carnegie Mellon. For more information, visit http://www.cmu.edu/hss/english/news/2012/brad-walker-receives-steinberg-award.html.

July 2012

Saul Carliner (DC’80) published “Informal Learning Basics,” a new book on informal learning.

Evan J. Segal (DC’82) wrote “From Local To Global: Smart Management Lessons to Grow Your Business.” The book provides business owners and executives with invaluable lessons learned based on the hands-on experience of a successful business leader. It offers knowledge and wisdom that will help managers grow their business, create jobs and navigate the challenging environment that they face in today’s global economy.

Ken Koedinger (DC'90), professor in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute and director of the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center, will present the keynote address, “Bridging the Gap Between Psychological Science and Educational Practice,” at the American Psychological Association annual conference Aug. 2 in Orlando, Fla. His speech will outline potential rifts between research and classroom practice and discuss how principles of learning can be applied and tested in controlled experiments in schools.

Susan (La Fiandra) Reid (DC’90) is in the MBA program at Marymount University, expecting to complete her degree by Spring 2013. An Administrator at the American Society of Civil Engineers, she works with Technical Committees of the Structural Engineering Institute.

Andrew “Andy” Marshall
(DC’92) recently earned his MBA at Florida State University, studying part-time while also serving full-time as an active duty officer in the U.S. Navy.

Ivan Schneider (DC’92) recently graduated from Harvard University with a Master of Liberal Arts in Extension Studies degree with a concentration in Foreign Literature, Language and Culture.

Academic Studies Press published a new book by Shirli Brautbar (DC’94) titled “From Fashion to Politics: Hadassah and Jewish American Women in the Post World War II Era."

Effective August 1, 2012, Marsha Lovett (DC’94) will become the Director of the Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence at Carnegie Mellon. Lovett earned her Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology, and after serving as a Visiting Scholar at the University of California at Berkeley, she returned to Carnegie Mellon and joined the Psychology Department as an assistant professor. Her research focused on learning, memory, and problem solving, and she developed computational models of strategy selection, skill acquisition, and working memory. Over time, her work turned toward applying these models to real-world learning situations and translating that theory into educational practice.

Kevin Gaughen
(DC’03) partnered with his former college roommate Tobin Coziahr (CS’00) to found Gaughen-Coziahr, a real estate investment firm with a niche market in data-driven analysis of income-producing real estate.

Ryan Spector (DC’05) is a senior associate of CBRE’s New York City Investment Properties Institutional Group. Among the 2011 transactions in which Spector participated was the $485 million sale of 750 Seventh Avenue.

Jacob Blish (DC’07) is vice president of marketing for Enertia Beverage, a startup company. Enertia Beverage produces Vital Energy, a vitamin-B enhanced, caffeinated energy drink.

Michael Szczerban (DC’07), associate editor at Simon & Schuster, has won the 2012 Ashmead Award. The award is “designed to nurture the career of a promising young editor in the field of book publishing,” in honor of editor Larry Ashmead’s history of mentoring young editors. Szczerban started at S&S in 2007 as an assistant managing editor and moved into editorial in 2009. His projects include “Two Gentlemen of Lebowski,” “Paula Deen’s Southern Cooking Bible,” and “Courage and Consequence.”

Lesley Ridge (DC’08, ’09) is content/community manager for Boston-based 360 Public Relations. She works alongside the agency’s team of interactive designers and client teams to develop digital and social media strategies; build, integrate and enhance online channels; and create and implement content calendars.

Yulin Kuang (DC'12) took the $15,000 first prize at the 2012 Steeltown Film Factory Competition this past weekend. Kuang’s script, titled “Perils of Growing Up Flat Chested,” is a screenplay about a high school girl named Katya. “This is a story I feel particularly compelled to tell, mostly because 16-year-old me needs to hear it,” Kuang told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. “Something I couldn’t have known then was that the horrible agonies of adolescence would be useful to me in a few years; that insecurities I had about my chest size, my acne, my total lack of coolness could be exploited for the sake of comedy and screenwriting.” Kuang will use the prize money this summer to make her short film.

April 2012

Ralph Sherman (DC’83) has opened a law office in Saint Clair Shores, Mich., which specializes in working with business owners regarding securities offerings, corporate entity information, trust formation and other legal issues.

Christine Klocek-Lim
(DC'91) published her fourth poetry collection, "Ballroom - a love story" (Flutter Press) in March 2012. Selections from it are forthcoming in Diode. In April 2012, Klocek-Lim hosted an interview series at November Sky Poetry in conjunction with Upper Rubber Boot Books. Interviews included: Neil Aitken, John Amen, Steve Bunch, Ayesha Chatterjee, Jim Daniels, O.P.W. Fredericks, Darla Govan, David Landrum, Oliver de la Paz, Abbas Raza, Catherine Rogers, Hannah Stephenson, Lizzy Swane, Donna Vorreyer, and Karen Weyant.

Phil Simon (DC’93), a four-time author, has a new book out titled, “The Age of the Platform: How Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google Have Redefined Business.” For more information, visit www.theageoftheplatform.com.

Dale Usner (DC’93) is vice president of biostatistics for Statistics & Data Corp. He is responsible for overseeing the operations of SDC’s biostatistics team, as well as providing leadership in the continued growth and evolution of SDC as a top-tier provider of biostatistics and data management services.

Smita Lal (DC’99) created an audio storytelling website called “Bedtime Kahani,” which shares children’s stories from India in a new and imaginative way. She researches and writes each story to depict leadership values for children and maintains an authentic voice of Indian/international culture.

The American Theatre Critics Association (ATCA) announced Darren M. Canady (DC’04) as recipient of its 2012 M. Elizabeth Osborn New Play Award for an emerging playwright. The award will be presented at ATCA's June conference in Chicago. Read more at http://www.playbill.com/news/article/161201-Playwright-Darren-M-Canady-Wins-Theatre-Critics-Osborn-Award.

Chad Pehrson (DC’05) is an associate at the law firm Parr Brown Gee & Loveless. He specializes in commercial litigation, including intellectual property disputes, patent-infringement claims, securities litigation, healthcare litigation, antitrust suits and government investigations.

Jeffrey Liebner (DC’03, ’09) joined the mathematics department at Lafayette College as an assistant professor. A statistics specialist, he has an extensive knowledge of the R/s-plus statistical program, and his research has been published in the Journal of Statistical Software.

Jessie B. Ramey (DC’09) was recently invited to the White House for a policy briefing. The President’s Office of Public Engagement invited 150 community leaders from Pennsylvania to the White House. Ramey, who was chosen because of her grassroots education advocacy involvement with Yinzercation, and the other participants received an economic briefing from the NEC, met with White House staff on special issues of concern, spoke at a listening session with Jon Carson, director of the White House Office of Public Engagement, participated in policy breakout sessions and had a tour of the White House.

Juan Acosta (DC’15), who is majoring in professional writing, was recently interviewed by NBC’s Andrea Mitchell about his study abroad semester in Havana, Cuba. Watch the interview at http://video.msnbc.msn.com/mitchell-reports/46858619/#46858588.

March 2012

“Baby Boomer's Guide to Caring for Aging Parents” by Bart Astor (DC’69) was published in November 2011 and is now available electronically. The book offers a step-by-step guide that explains what you need to do as you see your parents age. For more information, visit http://www.babyboomereldercare.com/.

Tony Peffer
(DC’89) has been promoted to academic dean of Castleton State College in Vermont.

Mackenzie Evan Smith (DC’11) wrote an article for the Pittsburgh City Paper about a work-study position she fulfilled at an after-school program for children from low-income homes. Read it at http://www.pittsburghcitypaper.ws/pittsburgh/extra-credit/Content?oid=1499573.

February 2012

After more than 20 years, Marc Field (DC'73) has left The Center for Theater Arts to become Executive Director at The First Tee of Pittsburgh and operate The Bob O'Connor Golf Course in Schenley Park, adjacent to CMU. The course is already hosting the CMU Golf team and a group of golfers from Tepper School. All CMU students, faculty and staff receive a discount on golf.

Lt. Col. Jeffrey A. Collins
(DC’03) has been awarded a Bronze Star Medal for his leadership and success while deployed in Afghanistan. Collins is currently an assistant professor of English at the U.S. Air Force Academy. Read more at http://www.usafa.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123289713.

January 2012

Raymond Martino (DC’69) of Voorhees, N.J. is president of the Ocean Marine Business Unit for The Travelers Companies, a provider of property casualty insurance for auto, home and business.

Leonard Hayes (DC’71) of Baton Rouge, L.A. was listed in the book “From Excellence to Eminence: 100 Years of African American Achievement at The Ohio State University.” He is the senior director of the U.S. Department of Education/OPE/IS.

Judy Johnston (DC’72) accepted an appointment as chairwoman of the board of directors of A+ Schools, an independent, nonprofit education watchdog dedicated to improving achievement among public-school students in Pittsburgh. Read more.

Phil Simon (DC’93) has written his fourth book, “The Age of the Platform.” Read more.

Jennifer (Desmond) Wilson (DC’94) is president and CEO of the First Community Foundation Partnership of Pennsylvania. The foundation manages $68 million in assets and awards grants of more than $2 million annually to charitable causes.

Amy (Lefkowitz) Lawrence (DC’95) and husband Brian Lawrence welcome their second child into the world. Emma Shae Lawrence was born November 23rd, 2011 at 8:30pm.

Adam Lazarus
(DC’06) published his first solo-authored book, “Super Bowl Monday: The New York Giants, the Buffalo Bills and Super Bowl XXV.” He is also the co-author (with CMU History Professor Steven Schlossman) of “Chasing Greatness: Johnny Miller, Arnold Palmer and the Miracle at Oakmont.”

Erica Cherry (DC’12), an English major, had her final paper for Law, Culture and the Humanities accepted for publication in the Washington Undergraduate Law Review. Cherry’s paper is titled “Law and Libraries: An Exploration of Library Privacy.”

November/December 2011

Ellen Frank (HS’67) was named one of two national winners of the Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health from the Institute of Medicine. The prize includes $20,000 and a medal. Read more.

David Ben Leavitt
(HS’69) will direct the world premiere of “The Last Daughter,” a play by Patricia Cacek. It will be performed at Footlighters Theater in Berwyn, Pennsylvania, beginning January 20, 2012.

Robert Szymczak (HS’80), a Penn State Beaver faculty member, is the recipient of the Swastek Award given by the Editorial Board of the Polish American Studies journal in recognition of the best article that appeared in the publication in the past year. Read more.

Best-selling author Jeffrey Zaslow (HS’80) co-wrote “Gabby: A Story of Courage and Hope” with Gabrielle Giffords and Mark Kelly. Zaslow also wrote “The Last Lecture” with the late CMU professor, Randy Pausch.

In light of the scandal at Penn State University, LeAnn Neal Reilly (HS'92) will be donating a portion of the proceeds from her latest novel, "Saint Sebastian's Head," to the Heath Evans Foundation, a charity that provides counseling and therapy to victims of childhood sexual abuse. Read more.

Jamie Edwards (HS’07) joined the Pittsburgh law firm McGuireWoods LLP in the complex commercial litigation department. Read more.

Michael Shaw (HS’07) was part of a Cornell Law School team that competed in the Northeast Super Regional round of the Phillip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition. The team went undefeated during the preliminary rounds and was seeded first going into the elimination rounds. After beating Yale in the quarterfinals, the team lost in the semifinals to Columbia, the eventual national champion and international runner-up. Out of more than 100 competitors, Shaw received the award for second best oralist.

Dan Schultz (HS’09) is among five developers, designers and programmer-journalists who have received fellowships from the Knight-Mozilla News Technology Partnership. Schultz will spend a year at the Boston Globe to generate ideas, train colleagues and bridge the gap between technology and the news. Read more.

Senior Yulin Kuang has started a production blog for her senior thesis film. Check out First Kiss Movie.

October 2011

StandOut, a company founded by Stan Muschweck (HS’74), is now providing marketing consulting and business development for Electric Owl Studios, a company created by graduates of CMU’s Entertainment Technology Center. Electric Owl develops games and game hardware and software for healthcare, sports entertainment and social marketing applications.

Terry Yosie
(HS’75, 81) of Washington, D.C. recently spoke at CMU on “Sustainability and the Evolving Global Chessboard” as part of the University Lecture Series. He is president and CEO of the World Environmental Council and is a member of the Committee on Improving Risk Assessment at the National Academy of Sciences and also a consultant with the EPA Science Advisory Board.

Judith Gibbons (HS’76) was named a Fulbright Scholar, which recently enabled the St. Louis faculty member to conduct research in her field of psychology and serve as a visiting scholar at the Universidad ded Valle de Guatemala.

Susan Brillman Naftulin, Esquire (HS’80) is president and COO of Rehab Financial Group, LP. She lives with her husband and two teenage sons in Villanova, PA.

Kimberly Ames (HS’81) is the country chemical engineering manager at NIKE Vietnam in Ho Chi Minh City. She write that “the country is changing at a pace that I’ve not seen in the other countries in which I’ve lived (Luxembourg, South Korea, Indonesia, Thailand and Taiwan).

Honora Rockar (HS’83) earned a doctor of science in information systems from Robert Morris University.

Eric Tenbus (HS’88) wrote “English Catholics and the Education of the Poor: 1847-1902 (Pickering & Chatto 2010). In the summer of 2010, he taught at the Middleburg Center for Transatlantic Studies in Middelburg, Netherlands.

Frank Troise (HS’88), senior portfolio manager at SoHo, appeared on CNBC’s “The New Retirement” on October 11, 2011. The segment featured his thoughts on gold.

Monica Harris Mindolovich (HS’90) celebrated the first year of her company, MHM Editorial Services, which provides re-writing, line-editing, manuscript critiquing and revision help for individuals and publishers.

Matthew D. Asbell (HS’93) is an attorney at Ladas & Parry, LLP. He co-edited a two-colume series regarding intellectual property rights and disputes: “IP Strategies for the 21st Century Corporation” and “IP Operations and Implementation for the 21st Century Corporation.”

Cameron Brown (HS’95) recently launched the much-scrutinized paywall for “The New York Times” online edition. He is the publication’s director of platform technologies.

Lori Bruce (HS’96) was appointed vice president of Community Voices in Medical Ethics, an advocacy non-profit that promotes informed consumer decision-making. She was previously a neuroimaging research at Harvard University.

David Koran (HS’96) is an enterprise security architect at the U.S. Department of the Interior: “The only agency,” he writes, “that aligns to my own personal sense of science, ecology and culture.”

Zachary Hiwiller (HS’05) is course director in the Game Design Program at Full Sail University in Winter Park, FL.

Rachelle Emard (HS’08) is university programs coordinator at Google.

Elliot Curtis (HS’09) recently spoke at the 1st Annual Sneakerology Spring Lecture Series. During his college years here, he helped initiate the first college-accredited course dedicated to sneaker culture. He also is the co-founder of his own clothing brand, vitaminTHICK.

Ryan Woodring (HS’10) edited and composited the green-screen sequences in the short film “Pinburgh.”

September 2011

Jeffrey Liebner joined the mathematics department at Lafayette College as an assistant professor. A statistics specialist, Liebner has extensive knowledge of the R/S-plus statistical program, and his research has been published in the Journal of Statistical Software. Liebner is interested in statistical applications to neuroscience. He earned his Ph.D. in statistics from Carnegie Mellon University, where he was also a teaching assistant for several statistics courses.

August 2011

After a thirty-year career building advertising and marketing agencies, Stan Muschweck (HS’74) recently launched his own strategy, marketing and growth firm, StandOut. For more information, visit http://www.beastandout.com/.

Robert L. Lewis (HS’74) died unexpectedly on March 1, 2010. His classmate, Margaret Louise Anthony (HS’74), wanted to make sure that his H&SS friends were aware.

KJ Hannah Greenberg, formerly Karen Joy Ravets, (HS'81) has two new books coming out: a full-length poetry collection, “A Bank Robber's Bad Luck with His Ex-Girlfriend” (Unbound CONTENT, Dec. 2011) and an assemblage of seventy short fictions, “Don't Pet the Sweaty Things” (Bards & Sages, Mar. 2012).

Carol Salus
, associate professor of art history at Kent State University, is near completion of a book, "Picasso: Greed, Desire, and Celestina." The project is a result of her participation as National Endowment for the Humanities scholar at the University of Virginia, Summer 2009.

Marc H. Anderson (HS’91) was promoted to associate professor (with tenure) at the College of Business, Iowa State University. He joined the Management Faculty at ISU in August 2008. Before that, he was a senior lecturer at the Waikato Management School in Hamilton, New Zealand for three years.

Scott Palermo
(HS’00) and his wife Melanie welcomed their fourth son, Jake Matthew, on August 23, 2011. Jake was born in Pittsburgh, weighed 7 lb. 11 oz. and has three big brothers - Nicholas, Lucas and Joseph. Palermo is a senior publications specialist at General Dynamics C4 Systems | Viz.

Adam Lazarus, who received his Masters in Professional Writing from the Department of English in 2006, has published his first solo-authored book, "Super Bowl Monday: The New York Giants, the Buffalo Bills, and Super Bowl XXV." Last year, Lazarus co-authored "Chasing Greatness: Johnny Miller, Arnold Palmer, and the Miracle at Oakmont" with History Professor Steven Schlossman. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/p7Kedj.

June/July 2011

Renee Marks Cohen (MM’63) has written a memoir called “My Connection to the Cuban Revolution,” a story which took place about seven months before she began her freshman year at Carnegie Tech.

Susan Schmacher Morris (MM’66) hosts a call-in radio talk show on WRCT called “What Would Your Mother Say?” The show airs every Tuesday from 9-10 p.m. EST and features students and mothers talking candidly about campus life.

Peter Fusaro (HS’72) of New York City has been appointed to the Board of Trustees of the Energy & Water Institute of New York at the United Nations. For more than three decades, he has been on the forefront of energy industry change and has created the terms “green trading,” “green finance,” and "green hedge funds.”

Susan Zimmerman (HS’74) published the article “A Circle of Caring” in the May 2011 issue of “Educational Leadership” from the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Susan Klein (HS’76) and her family returned to the Bay Area after 10 years in New York. She is now chief marketing officer at VantagePoint Venture Partners.

Capt. Mark Kelly and Gabrielle Giffords are collaborating with Jeffrey Zaslow (HS’80) to publish a memoir of their life together.

John “Buddy” Hobart (HS’81) of Oakdale, Pa., is host of “Solutions 21 Show,” a talk show broadcast on American Entrepreneur Radio that discusses how to mitigate the challenges of going into business.

Rachel Maines (HS’83) recently spoke about “Engineering as Law: Injury Epidemiology and Consensus Codes” at CMU. She is a visiting scientist at Cornell University.

Heather Newton (HS’86) of Asheville, NC has written a novel, “Under the Mercy Trees.” It received a starred review from Booklists.

Melissa Daniels (HS’91) of Aquebogue, NY is the owner of Plant Connection. The company is the developer and exclusive distributor of Gro2 green roof and green wall products throughout North America. She has been in the nursery and landscaping business for 20 years.

Eric Nyberg (HS’92) of Pittsburgh provided expert commentary at the IBM-sponsored “Jeopardy!” Viewing Party at CMU last February.

Michael Shapiro (HS’93) had his musical “A Feast of Snacks” recent premiere in the King’s Head Theater in London.

Heidi Hoover
(HS’93) was recently featured in the New York Times article, “Raised by a Pastor, and Now Leading a Synagogue.”

Mark Tamburri (HS’94) is a senior associate counsel and vice president of litigation at UPMC, a hospital and health insurance system. He is a partner at the law firm Reed Smith.

David Koran (HS’96) is an enterprise security architect for the U.S. Department of the Interior.

Jeremy Toeman (HS’96) is a founding partner at Stage Two, the company that designed the e-mail service called NudgeMail, which allows people to forward messages to NudgeMail’s inbox and then return to the messages at a later date.

Heather Arnet (HS’97) was featured as a newsmaker in the Pittsburgh Tribune Review for her appointment to the board of the Ms. Foundation for Women, a national social justice foundation based in Brooklyn and committed to building women's power to ignite change. Read more at http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/pittsburgh/s_746289.html.

Lisa Marinacci
(HS’98) is the composer/lyricist and co-writer of the new pop/rock musical “The Devil and Daisy Jane.” Jeremy Lewit (HS’98) is co-creator. The musical was accepted into the Los Angeles Festival of New American Musicals.

GroupMe, co-founded by Steve Martocci (HS’04), was named one of Time Inc.’s 10 NYC Startups to Watch. Martocci was also selected as one of Inc.com’s 30 Under 30.

Rachelle Emard (HS’08) is the university programs coordinator at Google located in New York City.

Andre Tartar (HS’09) of Pittsburgh write an article titled “Despots Emeriti” for New York Magazine.

Caroline Kessler, a senior creative writing major in the Department of English, received the American Jewish Committee's Goldman Fellowship and will spend nine weeks working in Warsaw, Poland, at the Forum for Dialogue Among Nations, which does work with interreligious dialogue and youth education. Kessler is one of 10 fellows out of approximately 150 who applied.

May 2011

Jewell Parker Rhodes (HS’75, ’76, ’79) was nominated as Best Historical Author by the Go on Girl! Book Club for her novel “Douglass’ Women.”

Steve Abel
(HS’75) is a proud grandfather of three, a senior technical writer at Time Warner Cable and would love to hear from other CMU alumni in the Denver, CO area.

Karen Elinich (HS'88) has earned an Ed.D. in educational technology from Pepperdine University. Her dissertation research, Augmented Hands-On: An evaluation of the impact of augmented reality technology on informal science learning behavior, was conducted at The Franklin Institute Science Museum in Philadelphia where she is a director.

Alan Houser (HS’89) is the new vice president of the Society for Technical Communication. Houser is president of Group Wellesley, Inc., a Pittsburgh-based company that provides technical writing, content management and workflow services to technology-oriented businesses.

April 2011

William Dunstan (HS’75) wrote “Ancient Rome,” published by Roman and Littlefield. Dunstan is currently a visiting scholar at the University of North Carolina and teaches history at North Carolina State University.

Claude Clayton Smith
(HS’78) wrote “Ohio Outback: Learning to Love the Great Black Swamp,” which is a compilation of his experiences living in Ohio during the past 22 years.

David Fawcett (HS’80) is partner in the Eastern Commercial Litigation Group of Reed Smith, LLP. Fawcett is a fellow in the American College of Trial Lawyers and has been listed in “Best Lawyers in America” since 2001, as well as in “Pennsylvania Super Lawyers Corporate Counsel” edition.

Richard Gorelick (HS’82) is the Baltimore Sun’s restaurant critic.

Bill Lamperes (HS’85) published his third novel, “The Attendant.”

Mark Orsag (HS’85) has become a full professor at Doane College. To celebrate, he climbed the Grand Teton last summer.

Kimberly Kirkwood (HS’86) and Tom Bonvissuto (S’87) celebrated their 20th wedding anniversary. They met as university cheerleaders.

Laurie (Schorr) MacDiarmid (HS’86) was selected by noted poet Denise Duhamel as the winner the Georgetown Review Poetry Contest and they will be publishing her book of poems, “Consolation Prize,” later this year.

Scott Berkun
(HS’94) wrote “The Myths of Innovation,” which has been profiled in The Economist, Wall Street Journal and New York Times.

On December 18, 2010, Jeremy Toeman (HS'96), his wife Ariella, and sons Sam and Davin, proudly welcomed baby sister Elia Ruth to the family.

Georgious Christou (HS’98) has earned a Ph.D. in computer science from Tufts University.

“Attached to Earth,” a poetry chapbook by Maureen McGranaghan (HS’99), will be published by Finishing Line Press in July 2011.

Jennifer Schaupp’s (HS’03) Whatifesto proposal “What if American citizens gathered regularly and used theatre as a way to converse with the government about social, human and political concerns?” was accepted by Theatre Communications Group for their National Conference. She will flying to Los Angeles in June to present the completed paper.

Brian Jensen
(HS’04) is executive director at Pennslyvania Economy League of Southwestern Pennsylvania. He also is senior vice president, civic policy for the Allegheny Conference on Community Development.

Nik Bonaddio (HS’04) launched a company called numberFire in September 2010. A predictive analytics engine geared toward fantasy sports, numberFire helps fantasy players make smarter decisions about their teams.

Abigail Coffin (HS’09) is a member of Las Aguilas de Moratalaz in Madrid’s La Liga B soccer team.

Elliot Curtis (HS’09) traveled around the world, blogging about his exploits and the game of basketball.

Steven Ambrose (HS’10) has accepted an internship at Vogue Knitting this summer.

March 2011

Robert E. Gleeson (HS'80,'97) has been named Vice President of Research and Thomas C. Sutton Chair in Policy Research by the San Francisco-based Public Policy Institute of California. Since 2003 Gleeson has been Director of the Center for Governmental Studies at Northern Illinois University. Earlier in his career he served for six years as Executive Director of CMU's Center for Economic Development. He and his wife, Denise Ryan Gleeson (HS'81), have two teenage children and plan to live in Walnut Creek, CA.

Julie A. Ransom (HS'91) is the owner of Briarwood Manor, a small bed & breakfast in the Pittsburgh neighborhood of Lawrenceville. She extends a warm welcome to fellow alum, their friends and family to stay for a visit. More information can be found online: http://briarwoodmanor.webs.com/ or join the "Briarwood Manor" group on Facebook.

Phil Simon (HS'94) has published his third book, “The New Small” (Motion, 2010).

Lillian Bertram (HS’06) recently won the Red Hen Press Saltzman Award and will have her book published next year.

Junior Yulin Kuang was one of six semifinalists in Steeltown Entertainment Film Factory’s screenwriting competition. For more, read this Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article: http://postgazette.com/pg/11084/1134538-60.stm.

Four students in Professor Kiron Skinner's research lab have been chosen to participate in the Clinton Global Initiative University, an annual conference to engage the next generation of leaders. The students, Ngiste Abebe, Amanda Kennard, Inyoung Song and Audrey Williams, will attend the event in San Diego in April. At the meeting, they will gather with students from around the world to discuss solutions for the global problems of education, environment and climate change, peace and human rights, poverty alleviation and public health.

February 2011

Noreen Castelli Sweeney (HS '69) has written an historical novel entitled "Francesca's Song" about her paternal grandmother who traveled from Italy aboard the SS Canada and landed on "Pittsburgh's grimy doorstep" in 1913. Sweeney, who has retired from teaching English at Long Island University, lives with her husband John (S '68) on Long Island's north shore and is a three-time grandmother. For more about the book: www.francescassong.com.

Dana S. Dunn (HS'82) published his 12th book-Best Practices for Technology-Enhanced Teaching & Learning: Connecting to Psychology and the Social Sciences (2011, Oxford University Press).

Susan Adams Henderson (HS'89) recently returned to campus to read from her debut novel, "UP FROM THE BLUE" (HarperCollins, 2010). Watch a video from the campus reading at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rnq2Yf-L5xs. "UP FROM THE BLUE" has been selected as a Great Group Reads pick by the Women's National Book Association, an outstanding softcover release by NPR, a Best Bets Pick by BookReporter, Editor's Pick by BookMovement, Editor's Choice by BookBrowse, a Prime Reads pick by HarperCollins New Zealand and a Top 10 of 2010 by Robert Gray of Shelf Awareness. It's also currently being translated into Dutch and Norwegian.

Rebecca Cantrell's (HS'90) third book in her award-winning Hannah Vogel mystery series, "A GAME OF LIES", is coming out July 2011 from Tor Forge (a division of Macmillan).

Jonathan Barnes
(HS'93) recently guest taught a magazine writing class for a day at CMU and read from his unpublished "Classic Primer to Journalism." Barnes, a freelance writer, also recently wrote a story on clean coal for Fortune magazine's website, Fortune.com.

Erin Tocknell's (HS'00) first book, "Confederate Streets," will be published in March 2011. The book was awarded the Social Justice and Equity in Creative Nonfiction Award. Recently, Tocknell was the Distinguished Alumni Reader in the Creative Writing Program's Adamson Visiting Writers Series.

Casey Taylor (HS'09) has joined Big Picture Communications in Pittsburgh, PA as an assistant account executive.

January 2011

Julie Johnson Reid (HS'71) has co-authored her first book, "The Female Vision, Women's Real Power At Work." Reid is an executive leadership coach with Executive Development Associates and has worked with the executive committees from Citibank, JP Morgan, State Street, Ann Taylor, BlackRock and the Rockefeller Foundation.

Ralph Duckworth, Jr. (HS'73) received Pittsburgh Magazine's Five Star Wealth Manager Award for the second consecutive year. He is a partner with ATI-Financial Services, LLC, based in Wexford, PA, and has taught at the Heinz College and Community College of Allegheny County.

Dan Fallon (HS'73) was the lead design consultant in the building of a new theater at the National Aviary in Pittsburgh. Fallon wrote, directed and produced the theater's first production that premiered last fall and is an adjunct professor at the Heinz College.

Timothy Devinney (HS'77) co-authored "The Myth of Ethical Consumer," which highlights 10 years of his global research on the myths and realities of social consumption and how general ideas of social consumption are gross oversimplifications of complex human behavior.

"Ninth Ward," the first Children's book by Jewell Parker Rhodes (HS'79), was selected as a 2011 Coretta Scott King Author Honor Book by the American Library Association.

Steven Breeden (HS'80) has been named to the Howard Community College Educational Foundation Inc.'s board of directors. Breeden has more than 30 years of experience in financial analyses of projects, economic modeling and daily project monitoring.

Dana S. Dunn
(HS'82) published his 11th book, "Using Quality Benchmarks for Assessing and Developing Undergraduate Programs."

Shari Olefson (HS'85) recently began a yearlong college and university lecture series. Olefson kicked the series off with a talk at Barry University in Miami, FL titled "Desperately Seeking the American Dream."

Rebecca Cantrell (HS'90) has written "Trace of Smoke," which was nominated for the Macavity Award.

Matthew Asbell
(HS'93) of New York City is a fellow of the American Bar Association Section of Intellectual Property Law. He also serves as chair of the Internet and Intellectual Property Law Committee of the American Bar Association Young Lawyers Division.

Michael Shapiro (HS'93) wrote the music and lyrics for the show "Super Sidekick," a children's musical that was part of the Los Angeles Festival of New American Musicals.

Phil Simon (HS'93) published his third book, "The New Small: How a New Breed of Small Businesses is Harnessing the Power of Emerging Technologies."

Maureen Daly Goggin (HS'94) is chair of Arizona State University's Department of English. She is a professor of rhetoric and has been an ASU faculty member since 1994.

Steven Sukal
(HS'97) of Belle Vernon, PA joined Grandbridge Real Estate Capital as vice president.

Benjamin Messing (HS'00) has become the latest Gawthrop Greenwood attorney to graduate from the Chester County Leadership Connection.

Constance Ciongoli-Koepfinger
(HS'02) was recognized by Support Women Artists Now Day on March 27, 2010, in New York City for her book "Candledancing."

Justin Cinicolo (HS'05) of San Francisco, CA is general manager of Zynga, a social networking game developer. In this role, he helps to ensure that more than 230 million daily users can tend to their farms and expand empires through popular games like FarmVille and Mafia Wars.

Alan Eaton (HS'08) of Washington, D.C. was promoted to contract specialist at the General Services Administration located in the White House. Eaton's duties include West Wing and East Wing procurement and the Eisenhower Executive Office Building.

Piper Lincoln (HS'08) continues her education at CMU by pursuing a PhD in behavioral decision economics.

Emily Garbinsky (HS'10) is the 2010 recipient of the Zelma Patchin Fellowship from the Mortar Board National Foundation Chair.

November-December 2010

Lisa Nawrot (HS'88), a professor of psychology at Minnesota State University Moorhead who researches infant vision, has received a three-year, $150,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health.

Scott Bricker (HS'99), Gwyneth Gaul (HS'01) and David Gilman (HS'04) were selected among Pittsburgh's 40 Under 40 by Pittsburgh Magazine.

October 2010

J. Michael Snizek (HS'78) has been promoted to director and product manager for Exchange Traded Funds for UBS WMUS.

Karen Joy Ravets Greenberg (HS'81) has written "Oblivious to the Oblivious: Wishfully Mindful Parenting," which includes a back-cover comment by author/journalist Jeff Zaslow (HS'80).

Kevin Burns (HS'87) is a partner at Goldberg Segalla, LLP, where he has been a practicing trial attorney for five years. Last November, he was elected a councilman in Patterson, NY, where he resides.

Joseph Heafitz (HS'90) participated in the Improv Boston inaugural "Improv Comedy Marathon: 26.2 Hours of Comedy," performing with actors he helped to train in the Cambridge Improv incubator.

Laurie A. Gawelko (HS'93) is currently finishing her Masters Degree in Human-Canine Interaction at Bergin University for Canine Studies in Santa Rosa, CA. It is the only school that offers graduate degrees in this particular area of training service dogs to do thing such as help the handicapped, detect lung, breast, and early ovarian cancers, and alert to epileptic seizures and diabetic blood sugar changes. Her thesis project is starting the Paws for Purple Hearts program in San Antonio, TX. To read more about the program, visit www.berginu.org.

Phil Simon (HS'94) will publish his third book, "The New Small," in November.

Lisa Ritter (HS'96) wrote "Pack Man," an article about backpack parachute inventor Charles Broadwick for "Air & Space Magazine."

Dave Brotherton (HS'97) has been appointed senior brand manager at Bob Evans Food Products in Columbus, Ohio. Brotherton is responsible for managing and growing Bob Evans's refrigerated side dish and frozen breakfast product lines. Brotherton and his family are relocating to Columbus from Redmond, Washington where he was a Marketing and Product Manager for Terex in its Genie brand aerial work platform equipment division.

Anita Jones (HS'99) was elected to the American Philosophical Society. She is the Lawrence R. Quarles Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Virginia.

Christopher Grant
(HS'04) received one of two inaugural Maxwell School of Syracuse University's Graduate Student Fellowship Grants from the Robertson Foundation for Government. According to the Maxwell School, Grant will receive full tuition funding and a generous stipend to support his studies in one of the school's dual master's degree programs in the fields of public administration/international relations, international relations/economics or public administration/economics.

Jaime Derringer (HS'06) received the Behavior Genetics Association 33rd Annual Thompson Award for the best presentation by an associate member in June 2010 in Seoul, South Korea.

Matthew Merewitz (HS'06) has been running his own boutique music public relations firm, Fully Altered Media, since September 2007. He is recognized in the industry for his cutting-edge use of new media to promote his clients.

Darbi Roberts
(HS'06) started her graduate work at Teachers College, Columbia University this fall for a master's in Comparative Education.

Mary Van Tyne (HS'07) appeared on the October 22 episode of Jeopardy! Van Tyne came in third place and won $1,000. View a synopsis of the questions and how she answered at http://www.j-archive.com/showgame.php?game_id=3487.

September 2010

Jewell Parker Rhodes (HS'79) has published her first children's book, "Ninth Ward." It's a survival tale from Katrina's assault on New Orleans.

After teaching and writing for 20 years, Amy Stempel (HS'88) has written a book. "Compose Yourself!: A Guide to Critical Thinking and Analytical Writing in Secondary School" is a quick and easy guide to teaching and learning critical thinking and analytical writing at the secondary level, regardless of the subject area.

Sean Brady (HS'94) was recently featured in the Pittsburgh Business Times for his role as director of development at Riverlife, a public-private partnership to reclaim, restore and promote Pittsburgh's riverfronts.

Eileen Angulo
(HS'08) began a one-year appointment as interim coordinator of Carnegie Mellon's Student Activities on Aug. 1. In her new role, Angulo advises the Activities Board, cmuTV, WRCT radio station and Thistle yearbook. In addition, she manages the Arts Pass Program and acts as the Student Affairs liaison for the University Lecture Series.

Second year Communication Planning and Information Design student Chelsey Delaney has been selected to organize a panel around her Master of Design Thesis topic at SXSW Interactive Festival in March 2011. Her work is one of the 200 selected proposals out of more than 2400 proposals.