Carnegie Mellon University

Lectures & Events

Stay up-to-date on upcoming Dietrich College lectures and events. A full listing is available on the Dietrich College Events Calendar.

Healing From Racial & Ethnic Discrimination Support Group

Monday, Oct. 3, 5 to 6:30 p.m.

Being directly impacted by racism, discrimination and/or systemic oppression can feel like an added pressure that you are having to deal with on top of the stress of being a student. If you are feeling that way, know you are not alone. Join our support group to understand how racial and ethnic discrimination impacts your mind, body and feelings, and find ways to work through them in a supportive and healing space.

Please email Group Facilitator Dr. Mengchun Chiang for more information and to set up a screening.

TimelyCare Information Session for Students

Tuesday, Oct 4, 11 to 11:45 a.m., Danforth Conference Room, CUC

You’re invited to join with your peers to learn more about TimelyCare, a new program at Carnegie Mellon that offers virtual well-being services and programs to students. You also will enjoy a free snack of your choice - cookies, brownies, chips and water.

TimelyCare representatives will be on campus to share about all the features that TimelyCare offers to you as CMU students, including 24/7 TalkNow, scheduled virtual mental health counseling, health coaching and well-being group sessions, all for free!

You can register for one of two sessions:

  • Monday, October 3, from 2 to 2:45 pm, in Danforth Conference Room (Cohon Center)
  • Tuesday, October 4, from 11 to 11:45 am, in Danforth Conference Room (Cohon Center)

Register for a TimelyCare session

You’ll also spot TimelyCare tabling in the Cohon Center on October 3 and 4. Stop by to enter a raffle for a $25 Amazon gift card if you sign up for the TimelyCare app between October 3 and 31.

Pause for Gratitude

Tuesday, Oct 4, 12:30 to 1 p.m., Zoom

Join CMU community members as we take time to pause and take stock of what is good in our lives and in the world. Sessions are casual; we start with a brief centering practice, often use a prompt to spark conversation, and share as we are ready to do so. Open to all. The Zoom link is the same each week.

Join Pause for Gratitude 

Tartan Allies Session 2

Tuesday, Oct 4, 2 to 4 p.m., Danforth Conference Room, CUC 2nd floor 

Tartan Allies focuses on being an ally to those in the LGBTQIA2S+ community. Tartan Allies is made up of three progressive sessions that participants must complete in order starting with session #1. Participants can attend all three sessions at their own pace. As our name suggests, being an ally is not a passive behavior. Good and effective allies listen, learn and act. Join us for Tartan Allies sessions if you are interested in becoming part of this inclusive and supportive community.

Register for Session 2 on October 4

LGBTQIA+ Support & Social Group

Tuesday, Oct 4, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., CaPS Conference Room, Morewood Gardens & E-Tower, 2nd floor 

LGBTQIA+ students! Join us Tuesday evenings to hang out and talk all things gender, sexual orientation, body neutrality/ positivity, coming out and existing as a person within the LGBTQIA+ community. Open to all Carnegie Mellon students.

Email to schedule a pre-group information session.

Facilitated by:

Jayme Jenkins, Ph.D. (they/them/theirs)

W.L. Mellon Speaker Series

Wednesday, Oct. 5, 12:30 to 1:15 p.m., Simmons Auditorium B, Tepper Quad 

The life and career accomplishments of Tepper alumnus Ed Harrington (MBA 2000), Chief Financial Officer of Genentech, will be featured as part of the annual W.L. Mellon Speaker Series on Wednesday, October 5, from 12:30-1:15pm in Simmons Auditorium.

Tepper professor and former dean Robert Dammon will moderate the in-person talk, which is sponsored by the Healthcare Club. Ed will touch on subjects like industry trends and leadership.

Boxed lunches will be provided.

Space is limited. Registration is requested.

Student Academic Success Center Workshop: Working Effectively in a Group

Wednesday, Oct. 5, 3 p.m., In-person

In this workshop, students will take an in depth look at the five stages of group development, examine their own group participation style and roles, be able to recognize and resolve conflict within a group and explore possible resolutions, and will learn about group leadership.

Attend this 60-minute hands-on workshop to learn the basics of creating a positive and productive group-learning environment for your study group.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand best practices for creating a positive group dynamic, learning from each other and holding each other accountable in a group.
  • Become familiar with a variety of collaborative learning techniques for engaging with course material and cooperating effectively in a group setting.
  • Gain experience working in small groups for improved learning, decreased procrastination, increased motivation and positive social experiences.

Register for the Oct. 5 workshop

Wellness Workshops with Comics

Wednesday, Oct. 5, 5 to 6 p.m.

Gabi Maier is a faculty member in Dietrich College and a certified coach who specializes in comics. Join her for a series of creative and fun workshops that address common challenges of campus life, utilizing comics to understand ourselves better and to come up with effective solutions for our challenges. No artistic skills necessary.

Limited seating; please register for location details and confirmation.

Korean Drama Watching & Conversation Group

Wednesday, Oct. 5, 5 to 6 p.m., Askwith Kenner Global Languages and Cultures Room (Tepper 1024)

This fall, join us in the Askwith Kenner Global Languages and Cultures Room (Tepper 1024) every other Wednesday at 5 p.m. for a Korean drama watching and conversation group! CMU community members interested in learning/practicing conversational Korean or simply watching (and commenting while watching) K-drama together are welcome to join.

Questions? Email Bota Tusmagambet and Devon Renfroe

Meditation in the Mindfulness Room

Wednesday, Oct. 5, 5 to 6 p.m., Mindfulness Room, First Floor, West Wing Hall

FREE: Join us for guided practice in yoga and meditation each week, a practice based on the techniques shared via Unified Mindfulness. It is non-secular and is inclusive to all backgrounds. You will have a chance to meditate each week, with the hope of learning techniques that will help you create a consistent self-practice.

Co-sponsored by Here for You Mental Health student organization, the Mindfulness Room and Student Affairs Wellness Initiatives

A little about our instructor:
Patrick O'Connell came to yoga after many years of training and competing in ice dancing. The combination of power and calmness that is central to Vinyasa yoga and meditation immediately resonated with him. He is a Certified Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga Teacher and has completed additional trainings and has certifications in Transformational Wellness and Ayruveda. His profound experiences with a daily meditation and pranayama (breathing practices) over the past 17 years have led him to become a certified Unified Mindfulness teacher and to lead numerous retreats and workshops to help others develop their practice. His experience and passion are woven into all his teachings.

Learn about the Mindfulness Room's events 

Paws to Relax: Pet Therapy

Wednesday, Oct. 5, 7 to 8 p.m., Mindfulness Room, First Floor, West Wing Hall

Join us for a relaxing session with certified pet therapy dogs, in our Mindfulness Room on campus. Each week, we'll host 1-4 dogs, depending on volunteer availability.

Fall Farmers Market

Thursday, Oct. 6, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Legacy Plaza

Join us at Chartwells' Fall Farmers Market on October 6th 11 a.m.-2 p.m. in Legacy Plaza. The market will be complete with local businesses, campus favorites including Millie's and La Prima, giveaways, games, music, local produce and a special Fall feature at Tartan Express.

Data Visualization Best Practices Workshop 

Thursday, Oct. 6, 12 to 1 p.m., Sorrells Library, Wean Hall 4th Floor

Data visualization, or the techniques used to visually display or communicate data, is an obvious output of our research or data analysis. Being able to effectively communicate your data to an audience is a necessary part of any project. How to harness visualization tools to tell a story will be presented in this short workshop. We will discuss how different types of graphs and charts are perceived and how they can be used to answer different questions, as well as what aspects of graphs make for effective storytelling.

Registration is required. Register for the Workshop

Economics Samosas and Swag

Thursday, Oct. 6 1 to 3 p.m., Tepper 2001

All undergraduate economics majors and undergraduate students who are interested in learning more about the economics are invited to stop by for a samosa, economics socks, and an economics book bag!

When My Heart Isn't In the Work

Thursday, Oct. 6, 4:15 to 4:45 p.m., Remote

This is a space for students to come together in community and to share and process the different ways we navigate our experiences within White-dominant spaces.

This connection space will be consistent and free of judgment and expectations. Come every week or come when you can; Counseling and Psychological Services (CaPS) will be here.

This event is open to everyone in the Carnegie Mellon community. 

Facilitated by: Kym Jordan Simmons, Ph.D.

Zoom ID: 947 7196 3194

Please contact the facilitator if you have any questions.

Russian Tea Time Conversation Group

Thursday, Oct. 6, 4:30 to 5:30 p.m., Posner Hall 348

Come speak Russian with the Department of Modern Languages! Join us Thursdays at 4:30 p.m. from September 15 to December 1 for Russian tea and conversation.

Facilitated by: Dr. Kats, Dr. Parker, Rossina Soyan, and Botagoz Tusmagambet

Questions? Contact David Parker and Bota Tusmagambet

“Art in Doubt: Tolstoy, Nabokov, & the Problem of Other Minds” with Tatyana Gershkovich 

Thursday, Oct. 6, 5 to 6:15 p.m., Remote

Tatyana Gershkovich, associate professor of Russian Studies, will give a talk about her forthcoming book, Art in Doubt: Tolstoy, Nabokov, and the Problem of Other Minds, at a virtual lecture hosted by the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Dr. Tatyana Gershkovich contests the familiar opposition of Tolstoy the moralist and Nabokov the aesthete. She argues that their divergent stylistic and philosophical trajectories were in fact parallel flights from the same fear: that one’s experience of the world might be entirely one’s own, private and impossible to share through art.

Yet unlike modernist and postmodernist authors for whom such doubt ends in absurdity or despair, Tolstoy and Nabokov both hold out hope that an artwork, when made in the right way, can serve to assuage our skeptical fears.

Tatyana Gershkovich is the William S. Dietrich Associate Professor of Russian Studies at Carnegie Mellon University. She is the author of Art in Doubt: Tolstoy, Nabokov, and the Problem of Other Minds (Northwestern UP, 2022) and essays published in PMLA, the Slavic and Eastern European Journal, the Journal of the History of Ideas, the Paris Review and other publications. 

Register for "Art in Doubt"

Student Academic Success Center Workshop: Time Management & Tips for Success

Thursday, Oct. 6, 7 p.m., In-Person

Students will learn time management skills and strategies to improve their academic performance. Students will learn various concepts that will assist them in having a successful semester.

Learning Objectives:

  • Students will recognize the importance of creating a structured environment for success and methods for accomplishing what they intend to accomplish.
  • Students will be able to identify and apply techniques to improve the management of time including the Eisenhower Matrix, time blocking and backward design.
  • Students will be able to understand concepts that assist them in achieving their own best performance including Ultradian rhythms and intentionality.
Register for the Oct. 6 workshop

International Community Connection Hour

Friday, Oct. 7, 1 to 2 p.m., Remote

Join us in this weekly connection hour hosted by internationals for internationals!

This is open to all internationals (students, staff and faculty) in the CMU community who want to come together to connect and support each other.

With:
Ife Sinclair, Ph.D
Shubhara Bhattacharjee, Psy.D
Mengchun Chiang, Ph.D

Join Zoom Meeting ID: 969-6481-1810

After Roe: Impact and Implications

Friday, Oct. 7, 1:30 to 3 p.m., Zoom

The English Department, in conjunction with the Dean's Office, will be holding a panel discussion with three leading thinkers, practitioners and scholars on the topic of reproductive justice. This event will be held via Zoom. 

Register for After Roe 

Preparing the Workforce of the Future

Friday, Oct. 7, 3 to 5 p.m., Hamburg Hall - Room A301 and Zoom 

Advancing technology offers both challenges and opportunities for our labor markets. What new jobs is technology creating and how can we safeguard future job quality? Can workforce training programs help in bridging the skills gap? How can we harness artificial intelligence to improve learning outcomes? This conference event will bring leading workforce economists and education technology experts to our campus for discussions on new and fast-growing skills and jobs, and innovative methods that educators, firms and policymakers can use to prepare workers for these shifting career opportunities.

Join us on Friday, October 7th in person or over Zoom for a keynote address by David Autor, MIT Ford Professor of Economics and co-chair of the MIT Task Force on the Work of the Future, giving cutting-edge insights into these questions.

Professor Autor will then join an expert panel with Avi Goldfarb, Rotman Chair in Artificial Intelligence and Healthcare at the University of Toronto; Sameena Shah, PhD, Managing Director at J.P. Morgan Artificial Intelligence Research; and Majd Sakr, Professor at the Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science. Anna Salomons, Professor of Economics at Utrecht University, will moderate.

Register for Preparing the Workforce of the Future

CAUSE: Heinz College Speaker Series

Friday, Oct. 7, 3:30 to 6 p.m., In-person or Zoom 

Situating Black Religious Leaders in the Struggle for Reparations
by R. Drew Smith, PhD., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary

The presentation will examine reparations advocacy by a vanguard of African American clergy proponents, from Bishop Henry McNeil Turner’s late-19th century demands for federal payments toward emigrationism and Black Atlantic linkages, to 21st century black clergy involvements in national level, local level and sector specific reparations policy activism. 

RSVP required.

Tartan Allies Session 3

Monday, Oct. 10 9 to 11:30 a.m., Danforth Conference Room, CUC

Tartan Allies focuses on being an ally to those in the LGBTQIA2S+ community. Tartan Allies is made up of three progressive sessions that participants must complete in order starting with session #1. Participants can attend all three sessions at their own pace. As our name suggests, being an ally is not a passive behavior. Good and effective allies listen, learn and act. Join us for Tartan Allies sessions if you are interested in becoming part of this inclusive and supportive community.

Register for Session 3 on October 10

Student Academic Success Center Workshop: Midterm Exam Prep

Sunday, Oct. 9, 1 p.m., In-Person or Zoom

In this workshop, students will learn how to achieve their highest level of performance for studying and completing midterm exams. Students will be able to identify and apply techniques to manage stress and test anxiety and will learn strategies for the different phases of test preparation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Students will be able to understand concepts that assist them in achieving their own best performance including energy management and Ultradian rhythms.
  • Students will be able to identify and apply techniques to manage stress and test anxiety including the Yerkes-Dodson Curve and the Eisenhower Matrix.
  • Students will be able to understand and implement strategies for test preparation including List-Breakdown-Act, phases of test preparation and the importance of post-exam reflection.

Register for the Oct. 9 workshop In Person

Register for the Oct. 9 workshop on Zoom

Healing from Racial & Ethnic Discrimination Support Group

Monday, Oct. 10 5 to 6:30 p.m.

Being directly impacted by racism, discrimination, and/or systemic oppression can feel like an added pressure that you are having to deal with on top of the stress of being a student. If you are feeling that way, know you are not alone. Join our support group to understand how racial and ethnic discrimination impacts your mind, body and feelings and find ways to work through them in a supportive and healing space.

Please email Group Facilitator Dr. Mengchun Chiang for more information and to set up a screening.

Pause for Gratitude

Tuesday, Oct. 11 12:30 to 1 p.m., Remote

Join CMU community members as we take time to pause and take stock of what is good in our lives and in the world. Sessions are casual; we start with a brief centering practice, often use a prompt to spark conversation, and share as we are ready to do so. Open to all. The Zoom link is the same each week.

Join Pause for Gratitude

 

Virtual Open House: MA in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition

Tuesday, Oct. 11 6 to 7 p.m., Remote

Learn more about the Master's in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition program at Carnegie Mellon University. The Master's in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition is a one-year, intensive program preparing U.S. and international students for a range of careers in language education and research, with opportunities to specialize in language learning research and teaching in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian, Spanish, and English as a Second Language (ESL).

Afghan Dinner & a Movie Night: Three Songs for Benazir

Wednesday, Oct. 12, 5 to 6:30 p.m., STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, College of Fine Arts Rm 111

CAS Dinner & a Movie Series: Join us for a buffet-style Afghan dinner provided by local caterer Zafaron and a screening of the award-winning Afghan short film, Three Songs for Benazir. The screening will be followed by a discussion with the filmmakers Elizabeth and Gulistan Mirzaei, hosted by CMU Scholar at Risk and Visiting Researcher of Afghan Cinema and Drama, Habibullah Sorosh.

Three Songs for Benazir is the story of a young man who—newly married to Benazir and living in a camp for displaced persons in Kabul—struggles to balance his dreams of being the first from his tribe to join the Afghan National Army with the responsibilities of starting a family. Nominated for an Academy Award, Three Songs for Benazir is the Winner of 13 awards, including the Cinema Eye Honors Outstanding Nonfiction Short. 

Zafaron is an Afghan, woman-owned, cooperative catering company operating in Pittsburgh since 2020.

Born in the Ghazni province of Afghanistan Habib Sorosh received his Bachelor of Cinema and Theater from the Department of Fine Arts at Kabul University and Master of Art Criticism at Kazakh National Academy of Arts. For the past ten years Sorosh has been a professor at Kabul University in the Department of Fine Arts and Dramatic Literature. He is currently a Visiting Researcher in the Schools of Drama and Art at Carnegie Mellon University through the Scholars at Risk program.

Elizabeth and Gulistan Mirzaei’s films have been supported by the Tribeca Film Institute, CalHumanities, Women in Film, Points North Institute, IFP and the Bertha Foundation. They founded Mirzaei Films to be an indigenous window into modern-day Afghanistan, making films that are recognized for their intimacy, rare access and how they challenge perceptions of Afghanistan.

This event is co-sponsored by The Kim and Eric Giler Humanities Lecture Fund, The CMU Sustainability Initiative, The Humanities Scholars Program, and the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry. 

This event is free, but space is limited.

Please RSVP for Afghan Dinner and a Movie Night

IPS Policy Forum Lecture Series: Midterm Elections & the Impact of Redistricting

Thursday, Oct. 13, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., Remote

In the lead-up to midterm elections on November 8, please join us for a conversation with the Sudler Family Professor of Constitutional Law at New York University, Richard Pildes. Professor Pildes has recently been appointed to the President's Commission on the Supreme Court of the United States by President Biden. He is one of the country’s leading experts on legal issues concerning American democracy and the structure of American government, including voting rights, elections and campaigns, as well as separation of powers, administrative law and constitutional law more generally.  

Register for the Oct. 13 IPS Policy Forum Lecture