Carnegie Mellon University

Eberly Center

Teaching Excellence & Educational Innovation

Faculty Series on Teaching and Learning Image

Special Interest Group: Indigenous Ways of Knowing

Event Date: March 12, 29, and 26, 10:00-11:30am
Location: 
Tepper Quad 1308

We live and teach in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a city developed for settlers. While this land has sustained Pittsburgh for approximately 300 years, it has sustained life for far longer. Although today the land reflects the Western culture of its majority residents, the land maintains the histories and cultures of the Indigenous Peoples that lived here and persist to this day. Being occupants in this Western city, our teaching is influenced by Western perspectives, metrics, and ideas. In this SIG, our group will explore readings discussing Indigenous Pedagogies and ways of knowing. Our goal is to engage with those ways of knowing with interest and care to respect the land – and its history – we call home while avoiding exoticizing Indigenous knowledge or appropriating Indigenous culture. This SIG’s aim is to build towards indigenizing education and for participants to reflect on their position as settlers. “Indigenizing education means that indigenous approaches are seen as normal, central, and useful, rather than archaic, exotic, alternative, or otherwise marginal” (Merculief and Roderick, 2013). 

As a group, we will seek to answer the following questions: What does it mean to be indigenous to Pittsburgh? to the land? What are some indigenous ways of knowing and pedagogies? What teaching strategies could be implemented in your class that allow for different ways of knowing to be discussed and used as sources and deliverables in the classroom? What are some strategies that could be implemented to value indigenous knowledge in your discipline and classes? What is your relationship with knowledge and learning as a settler teacher or if applicable, as an indigenous teacher in a settler institution?

Merculief, Ilarion (Larry) and Roderick, Libby. Stop Talking, Indigenous Ways of Teaching and Learning and Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education. University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013.

Register for this SIG here.


Provost’s Inclusive Teaching Fellowship ($5000 stipend)

Proposals due: March 12, 2024

PITF supports the adoption of inclusive teaching techniques by CMU faculty of any rank by working closely with the Eberly Center to iterate on a CMU course they are actively teaching. Fellows also meet one or twice per month as a special interest group to explore research and strategies on inclusive teaching. 

See more info and examples on the PITF website.

Submit a PITF proposal here.

Sign up to attend a Zoom info session on the PITF, GAITAR and Wimmer Fellowships on Monday, February 5, 9:30-10:30am or Thursday, February 8, 12:00-1:00pm.


Teaching as Research Fellowship: Generative AI ($5000 stipend)

Proposals due: March 12, 2024 

Generative AI Teaching as Research (GAITAR) Fellows receive an award and copious in-kind support from a team of Eberly Center colleagues to:

  • implement a teaching innovation using a generative AI tool in a Fall 2024 or Spring 2025 CMU course;
  • measure the impacts of the innovation on student learning;
  • disseminate their findings at CMU and beyond, and
  • participate in a special interest group of instructor-scholars meeting several times per semester. 

Prior experience with generative AI or educational research is NOT required.

All CMU instructors of record are eligible to apply.

For more information, see the request for proposals.

Use this brief Google Form to submit a GAITAR proposal.

Sign up to attend a Zoom info session on the PITF, GAITAR and Wimmer Fellowships on Monday, February 5, 9:30-10:30am or Thursday, February 8, 12:00-1:00pm.


Wimmer Faculty Fellowship for the Development of Teaching ($3000 stipend)

Proposals due: March 12, 2024

Wimmer Fellowships provide resources and Eberly Center support to junior faculty designing or redesigning a course by innovating course materials and/or pedagogical approaches. Each Fellow works in close collaboration with Eberly Center colleagues to design, implement, and assess the impacts of their innovations. 

See more information on the Wimmer Fellowship application process here.

Sign up to attend a Zoom info session on the PITF, GAITAR and Wimmer Fellowships on Monday, February 5, 9:30-10:30am or Thursday, February 8, 12:00-1:00pm.

Coming Soon! Recurring Signature Eberly Center Programs

Instrumented, Technology-enhanced, Active Learning Classrooms

Proposal due date: TBD

Program duration: up to one semester of class sessions

The Eberly Center provides two instrumented technology-enhanced, active learning classrooms in the Tepper Quad. These rooms are designed to capture rich data on classroom interactions and behaviors that can be used for (a) formative feedback on your teaching and your students’ learning, (b) exploring the effect of a new technology or pedagogy you wish to incorporate in your course, (c) conducting educational research in a real class setting, and more! Faculty work closely with Eberly colleagues to design and implement their proposed use of an instrumented classroom as well as to collect, interpret, and apply any data collected.  


For more info: see examples of use cases and the classroom request form

Teaching as Research Institute:
Can generative AI tools enhance student learning?

Are you wondering how generative AI tools might enhance student learning and equity in CMU courses? Join a community of instructor-scholars brainstorming how to apply generative AI tools in their teaching AND measure the impacts on student learning! Prior experience with AI or educational research is NOT required.

This 4-session program will help you generate ideas for teaching innovations AND prepare to study them in your own CMU course, with tangible Eberly Center support from start to finish. Participants will:

    • Design a generative AI teaching intervention to implement and investigate, 
    • Identify data sources to measure student learning,
    • Design a study to conduct in your course, and
    • Exit with an action plan, including Eberly support, that you could submit as a Teaching as Research Fellowship proposal.

Teaching as Research Fellowship: Generative AI

Generative AI Teaching as Research (GAITAR) Fellows receive a $5000 award and copious in-kind support from a team of Eberly Center colleagues to:

  1. implement a teaching innovation using a generative AI tool in a Spring or Fall 2024 CMU course; 
  2. measure the impacts of the innovation on student learning; and
  3. disseminate findings at CMU and beyond.

Fellows also participate in a special interest group of instructor-scholars meeting several times per semester to discuss their successes, challenges, and lessons learned teaching with generative AI tools. 

Prior experience with generative AI or educational research is NOT required.
All CMU instructors of record are eligible to apply.

Spotlight on Innovative CMU Teaching: Generative AI

This event will showcase innovative teaching by CMU faculty and graduate students who have used or are using Generative AI approaches for teaching and learning in their courses. Presenters will share their teaching strategies through a sequence of five minute presentations followed by Q&A. Attendees will have additional opportunities to discuss goals and challenges around Generative AI in teaching and can expect to leave with practical strategies and a better sense of whether or not Generative AI might be well aligned with their teaching and learning goals. Faculty, staff, postdocs, and graduate students welcome!