Carnegie Mellon University

Below is a listing of programs for elementary school students and parents. Programs are conducted by a variety of Carnegie Mellon Faculty and Staff. Click on each program link for contact and general information.

The Architecture Explorations program encourages Pittsburgh youth to look closely at their built environment, be open to creative expression, ask questions, think critically, and understand civic responsibility - all through the lens of architecture. Architecture Explorations is a collection of architecture-based extracurricular and academic enrichment programs for students in kindergarten through high school, offered through Carnegie Mellon's School of Architecture. Our organization partners with several Pittsburgh communities, schools, and museums to provide an array of architecture education programs. Whether you are a student, parent, counselor, teacher, or community organization, we would love to hear from you and help devise a plan to provide a program that is tailored for each appropriate age-group and organization.

Contact: Samantha Weaver
Email: scarter@andrew.cmu.edu
Phone: (412) 268-5551  
Site: http://soa.cmu.edu/architecture-explorations/

A variety of camps and clinics are offered each summer. Programs include FITT Camp for children aged 7-14, soccer camp for children ages 5-14, Learn to Swim Classes and more!

Phone: (412) 268-1236 
Site: http://athletics.cmu.edu/athletics/camps-clinics

Traditionally, our program is designed to offer options for morning or afternoon preschool and full-day kindergarten for children in community as well as CMU families (constituting approximately 85% and 15% of our population respectively). Consistent with the 1990 CMU Work and Family Report, we offer a high quality program equitably to diverse families. To this end, we offer tuition waivers to low-income families.

In addition to providing a quality educational program, we support our families by providing written information and seminars that might be of interest to all families, age appropriate family activities (e.g., family festivals, school visits, etc.), and individual counseling and referrals as needed.

Phone: (412) 268-2199  
Site: http://www.psy.cmu.edu/cs/

El Círculo Juvenil de Cultura supports the maintenance and development of Spanish as a heritage language and cultural literacy for children of Latino families in the Pittsburgh community. The program provides a space where families and children can develop social networks with other Latino families in the community. El Círculo promotes heritage language and culture development by creating an environment in which bilingual children can explore and maintain their identities and cultures. The program aims to strengthen students' awareness of the relationship between the arts and society through music, poetry, stories, songs, theater, art, and dances. Through interaction with Spanish-speaking professional teacher-facilitators and college students, children are encouraged to develop and be proud of their heritage language and cultures and appreciate the social and cultural value of being bilingual-bicultural citizens of their new country, the United States.

Email: circulojuvenil@gmail.com
Phone: (412) 268-5149
Site: http://circulocmu.blogspot.com/

The Leonard Gelfand Center for Service Learning and Outreach hosts programs during the summer (July) and on select Saturdays in the fall and spring for students in grades K-9. These classes were developed by Carnegie Mellon University Faculty and Staff and are designed to be rigorous, educational, STEM focused, hands-on and fun.

Click HERE for upcoming K-12 class & program information.

Email: GelfandCenter@andrew.cmu.edu
Phone: (412) 268-1863
Site: http://cmu.edu/gelfand

Each spring, the Institute for Complex Engineered Systems (ICES) hosts Moving 4th Into Engineering, an engineering outreach event. Approximately 25 fourth-grade students from various Pittsburgh area schools are invited to visit Carnegie Mellon's campus and participate in a full day of science activities. This program provides the students with an interactive introduction to the exciting world of engineering. Through various experiments and exercises, students learn how engineering plays a part in many of the ordinary things they see every day. Moving 4th aims to inspire young students to seek out future studies in math, science and engineering. A diverse group of ICES faculty, staff and student volunteers lead the program and work with the children throughout the day.

Contact: Alicia Angemeer
Email: adbrown@andrew.cmu.edu
Phone: (412) 268-5227
Fax: (412) 268-5229
Site: http://www.cmu.edu/ices/outreach/moving-4th.html

With a passionate interest in Outreach for the School of Drama, Natalie Shirer has developed a community based outreach course for her sophomore students, who teach distinct speech to disadvantaged children to help fifth grade students at Holy Rosary School improve speaking skills. To have a teaching tool for this work, she is working with research scientists at Cepstral, LLD to adapt vocal synthesis software. It is being tested in her outreach course The My True Voice Project. The My True Voice Project combines the teaching of pronunciation with an exploration of poetry and the use of voice synthesis software. The program is featured on the PBS program hosted by Robyn MacNeil: "Do you Speak American?"

Contact: Natalie Shirer
Email: nbaker@andrew.cmu.edu
Phone: (412) 268-5751  
Site: http://www.pbs.org/speak/seatosea/standardamerican/truevoice/

PROGRESS takes a fresh approach to address the need for gender equity in society by teaching middle school aged girls (8-12 years old) how to negotiate. PROGRESS has three core objectives: develop local and national tools to teach women and girls how to harness the power of negotiation, form networks between nonprofit organizations to efficiently disseminate information about issues impacting women, and explore obstacles to and potential solutions for the advancement of women. The tendency for women to negotiate less than men is a current and persisting problem, even among young college-aged women and those in business schools today. Unless society makes changes to the way we socialize our children and change our attitudes to allow women to be more direct in asking for what they want, this problem will continue to have an adverse impact on women for decades to come.Targeted programs that seek to educate women and girls about this issue and teach them to negotiate effectively can have a very tangible impact on their well-being. Furthermore, raising awareness of a critical gender biases that create long term inequities can be instrumental in societal change.

Email: progress@andrew.cmu.edu
Phone: (412) 268-8650   
Fax: (412) 268-5338
Site: http://progress.heinz.cmu.edu

Project LISTEN (Literacy Innovation that Speech Technology Enables) is an inter-disciplinary research project at Carnegie Mellon University to develop a novel tool to improve literacy; an automated Reading Tutor that displays stories on a computer screen, and listens to children read aloud. To provide a pleasant, authentic experience in assisted reading, the Reading Tutor lets the child choose from a menu of high-interest stories from Weekly Reader and other sources including user-authored stories. The Reading Tutor adapts Carnegie Mellon's Sphinx-II speech recognizer to analyze the student's oral reading and intervenes when the reader makes mistakes, gets stuck, clicks for help, or is likely to encounter difficulty. The Reading Tutor responds with assistance modeled in part after expert reading teachers, but adapted to the capabilities and limitations of the technology. The current version runs under Windows (TM) 2000 on an ordinary Pentium (TM) with at least 128MB of memory. In 2002-2003, hundreds of students are using the Reading Tutor at 9 schools.

Contact: Jack Mostow
Email: mostow@cs.cmu.edu
Phone: (412) 268-1330
Site: http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/~listen/ 

The Robotics Education Lab is a central resource to support courses and individual projects. Equipment includes manipulators, mobile robots, electronics & mechanical fabrication benches, Lego, a video editing workstation, machine vision systems and more.

Anyone affiliated with CMU and interested in robotics is welcome. Stop by and see what the lab has to offer. Lab address: Newell-Simon Hall 3206 x8-5561.

Contact: Greg Armstrong
Email: roboman@andrew.cmu.edu
Phone: (412) 268-2007  
Site: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~rel/

Strong Women, Strong Girls is a group-based mentoring program that uses the study of contemporary women role models, mentoring relationships between college-aged women and girls in grades 3-5, and activities focused on skill-building, to help enhance the lives of at-risk girls. Through building positive self-esteem and skills for life-long success, Strong Women, Strong Girls is working to strengthen the futures of all women and girls involved in the program. Approximately 25 women at Carnegie Mellon serve as mentors for over 70 girls in the Pittsburgh area. Carnegie Mellon partners with five different local elementary schools and community centers as programming sites. Each week, smaller teams of mentors travel to the sites to engage and work with the girls.

Email: swsgcmu@gmail.com
Phone:  (412) 488-0791   
Site:   http://swsg.org/about-us/ 

This is a highly interactive presentation by undergraduate and graduate students in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon who talk about why/how they began studying the area, their current experiences, what Computer Science means to them now, and their future hopes and expectations. The middle and high school presentations include a guessing game, a slide show of CS applications, algorithm style puzzles, a robot demo, and much more. The spin-off graduate level Roadshow (presented to undergrads) includes general information on going to graduate school and short research talks.

Contact: Carol Frieze
Email: women@cs.cmu.edu
Phone: (412) 268-9071  
Site: http://women.cs.cmu.edu/What/Outreach/Roadshow/