Carnegie Mellon University

Below is a list of professional development programs for K-12 Teachers.

ACTIVATE (Advancing Computing and Technology Interest and innoVAtion through Teacher education) is a series of three free workshops offered for high-school teachers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) in the northern Appalachian region surrounding Pittsburgh, including Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and western Maryland. The workshops will cover computing with Alice, computational thinking, and Java programming for math and science. Accepted teachers will learn how to integrate computing topics and skills into their STEM classes to increase student interest in computing as a field of study in college and as a potential career path. All costs will be paid for by a grant from the National Science Foundation. These workshops will provide modest stipends for participating teachers to complete surveys during and after the workshop to evaluate the use of the presented material in the classroom. (This work is supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation - DRL-0833496.)

Contact: Tom Cortina
Email: tcortina@cs.cmu.edu
Site: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/activate
Phone: (412) 268-3514   
Address:
Carnegie Mellon University
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

The Computer Science for High School (CS4HS) program at Carnegie Mellon is a half-week summer workshop to disseminate curriculum modules that high school teachers (teaching primarily AP computer science and introductory programming courses) can implement in the classroom that provide students with an exposure to the versatility and applicability of the programming skills they have learned throughout the school year. Educators can use the modules from the workshop to show students that computer science is much more than computer programming. This workshop is also open to K-8 teachers and college instructors teaching introductory computer science. ACT 48 credit is available for Pennsylvania teachers.

Contact: Tom Cortina
Email: tcortina@cs.cmu.edu
Site: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/cs4hs/
Phone: (412) 268-3514   
Find out about the Moon Mission Challenge for High School Students!

Tuesday, October 9 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Gates Hillman Center room 2109
Carnegie Mellon University

Come join Innovate Our World and CMU’s Astrobotic Technology for an informational session about the Moon Mission Challenge – where high school student teams learn about the Moon and design a payload for one of Astrobotic’s robotic lunar rovers!  Astrobotic is a leading team in Google’s Lunar X Prize Challenge, where teams compete to be the first private group to successfully land and operate a rover on the Moon’s surface for a prize package worth up to $30 million dollars!  Students get an opportunity to work with lunar scientists and engineers to design innovative payloads to present at Innovate Our World’s I3 Conference in June 2013.  Judges from NASA, Astrobotic, industry, and universities will judge the presentations with prizes for the top three teams. 

Attendees at the October 9 event will hear from Innovate Our World about the Challenge, including teacher training and support, and get an on-site tour of Astrobotic’s work in robotics.  Teachers do not have to attend this session to enter the Challenge but those present will automatically become eligible for a teacher stipend if they participate in the competition.  Teams can register for the Challenge by going to www.innovateourworld.org starting October 1.  For more information about the Moon Mission Challenge, please email Ron McCandless at ron@innovateourworld.org.

Participants will earn act 48 hours for participation in this event.  Snacks will be provided

Detailed information about the location will be sent to registered participants in the beginning of October. Please register here.

Today's elementary and secondary school principals need to know more than the skills they used as teachers. They need to be adept at strategic planning, finance, budgeting, personnel administration, the management of information systems and many other skills not usually needed in the classroom. In many ways, the job of a principal more closely resembles that of a private-sector manager than a classroom teacher. The courses required in the concentration in Educational Leadership teach these skills and is approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education to prepare elementary and secondary school administrators for Principal Certification.

Email: hnzadmit@andrew.cmu.edu
Site: http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/mpm
Phone: (412) 268-2194   
Since 2010 the Siemens Foundation has provided support for this three-day program during which participants interact with faculty, graduate and undergraduate students to develop a broader understanding of what it means to conduct research and how research is integrated into the work of a scientist or engineer. Participants also look at opportunities for middle and high school students to become engaged in research activities and how they can share their work through competitions and other programs that are conducted regionally.   This program is typically held in the summer.  Contact Judy Hallinen, jh4p@andrew.cmu.edu for more information.

A course in Urban Music Education is offered through the School of Music, in conjunction with a grant from the US Department of Education. Students attend all in-service sessions with the public school teachers, observe in the classroom, design lessons and co-teach them with the public school teachers.


Contact: Natalie Ozeas
Email: nlozeas+@andrew.cmu.edu
Phone: (412) 268-2382  
The SUCCEED Teacher Workshop is a 2-day program during which CMU faculty and students work with teachers to better understand how much they already know about climate/energy. Our goal is to help teachers incorporate these materials into their curriculum to address issues related to sustainable energy systems and climate change. The SUCCEED program is supported in part by the Leonard Gelfand Center and by the National Science Foundation.

Conducted by Dr. Marc DeGraef, professor of Materials Science & Engineering, a professional development program for teachers of math, science and technology who learn about activities and materials that have been developed to integrate scanning electron microscopy into classroom lessons in Pennsylvania.  SEMs are used remotely by teachers and students who send samples to Carnegie Mellon.  A smart board in your school can be used to operate the machine that is housed at Carnegie Mellon.   This program is supported by ASPEX Corporation and the National Science Foundation.

Site: http://mpg.web.cmu.edu/TACTILS.html