Carnegie Mellon University

Davd Dzombak, P.E.

Davd A. Dzombak, P.E. (E 1980,) 1981)

Hamerschlag University Professor Emeritus, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

David Dzombak is Hamerschlag University Professor Emeritus at Carnegie Mellon. His professional focus is on water quality engineering, water resource sustainability, and energy-environment issues. 

Dzombak serves on the ASCE Industry Leaders Council.  He is a registered Professional Engineer in Pennsylvania, a Board Certified Environmental Engineer, a Diplomate Water Resources Engineer, a Distinguished Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

[Full Bio]

Steven Fenves

Steven J. Fenves

University Professor Emeritus, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Dr. Fenves' research and teaching has been devoted to computer-aided engineering, an emerging discipline that seeks to understand, model and improve the processes civil and environmental engineers use in the planning, design, construction and operation of engineered facilities. He was the co-developer of one of the earliest structural analysis systems (STRESS, 1962). His research has dealt with design standards, engineering databases, knowledge-based systems, machine learning, and comprehensive design environments.

Dr. Fenves is the author or co-author of six books, over 100 journal articles and book chapters, and over 120 articles and conference papers. His 38th PhD student graduated in May 1998. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and an Honorary Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). Among his awards are the Huber Prize and the Moisseif and Winter Awards from ASCE, the Alumni Honor Award and Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University of Illinois, and the Teare Award and Doherty Prize from Carnegie Mellon University.

He received his BS (1957), MS (1958) and Ph.D. (1961) degrees in Civil Engineering from the University of Illinois, and served on the faculty there (1958-71). He joined Carnegie Mellon University in 1972, serving as Head of the Civil Engineering Department (1972-75) and Director of the Design Research Center (1980-84), attaining the position of University Professor in 1984. He retired from active teaching in 1998.

Upon retirement, Dr. Fenves moved to the Washington D.C. area to be close to family and to work with colleagues at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Irving Oppenheim

Irving Oppenheim

Emeritus Professor

Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Emeritus Professor Irving J. Oppenheim is jointly appointed at Carnegie Mellon University in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and in the School of Architecture.

Currently, Oppenheim works with colleagues in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering to develop novel devices and signal processing methods for structural sensing. He studies guided wave ultrasonics in plates and in pipes and developed MEMS devices for vibration sensing and for acoustic emission testing. Using real-world operating conditions, he has studied ultrasonic scatterer detection in pipes. Oppenhiem works experimentally with wireless ultrasonics using inductive coupling, wireless chemical sensing (and wireless strain sensing) using RF-coupled SAW devices, and microparticle manipulation in microfluidic channels using SAW devices.  

Oppenheim has a background in structural design and is licensed as a Professional Engineer with broad consulting experience in failure analysis of structures. His past research experience in areas include structural dynamics, lifeline earthquake engineering, robotics, and computer-aided-engineering. Previous experimental studies include field tests of ambient vibrations in buildings, force-cognitive manipulation, and dynamically stable robots. 

Oppenheim also conducted analytical studies which included historical masonry (arches and domes), tensegrity structures, non-linear dynamics, optimization, geometric reasoning, and shape grammars. He is an author of more than 40 journal articles and more than 160 conference publications.

Mitchell Small

Mitchell Small (E 1975)

Emeritus Professor

Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Mitchell Small is an Emeritus Professor at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU).  Small’s research involves mathematical modeling of environmental systems, environmental statistics, risk assessment, and decision support.

Current projects include the design and evaluation of leak detection at geologic CO2 sequestration sites and shale gas extraction wells; the value of scientific information for conflict resolution among stakeholders with different values and beliefs; and the development of decision support tools for water, energy and ecosystem management.  He has published over 200 manuscripts in peer reviewed journals (160), books and conference proceedings.  

Small has served as a member of the US EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB) and has been a member of a number of US National Research Council (NRC) committees, most recently as chair of the NRC Committee on Risk Management and Governance Issues in Shale Gas Extraction.  He is a Fellow of the Society for Risk Analysis and served as an associate editor for the journal Environmental Science & Technology (1995 – 2011), where he helped to initiate the policy analysis section of the journal.