Carnegie Mellon University

Joe Jr.

Joe William Trotter, Jr.

Director and Founder, CAUSE

  • Baker Hall 246C
  • 412-268-2875
Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Joe William Trotter, Jr. is Giant Eagle Professor of History and Social Justice and past History Department Chair at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He is also the Director and Founder of Carnegie Mellon’s Center for Africanamerican Urban Studies and the Economy (CAUSE). Professor Trotter received his BA degree from Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Minnesota. He is currently working on a study of African American urban life since the Atlantic slave trade.

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Hikari Aday

Hikari Aday

Program Coordinator, CAUSE

  • Baker Hall 244
  • 412-268-8928
Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Baker Hall 244
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Mrs. Aday provides administrative and clerical support for Joe W. Trotter in his capacity as a faculty member of the Department of History and as the director of CAUSE. In addition, she maintains records, files, and databases, provides research support, and assists in the preparation of manuscripts for publication. She coordinates and assists with publicity of conferences, speaker engagements, and the CAUSE Speakers Series. She is a graduate of the State University of New York at New Paltz.

Andrew Pope

Andrew Pope

CAUSE Postdoctoral Fellow 2018-2019

  • Baker Hall 242C
  • 412-268-9808
Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Baker Hall 242C
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Andrew Pope is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Center for Africanamerican Studies and the Economy in Department of History at Carnegie Mellon University. He studies African American history, with a focus on how race, gender, and sexuality affected social movement organizing in the 20th century.

His dissertation, “Living in the Struggle: Black Power, Gay Liberation, and Women’s Liberation Movements in Atlanta, 1964-1996,” examines the activism of poor and working class people after the Civil Rights Act made Jim Crow illegal. Andrew’s research indicates that a diverse set of activists collaborated to assert control over federal antipoverty programs. This collaboration led to thousands of residents forming coalitions across racial, gender, and sexual lines to continue what they called “the struggle”: a decades long effort to make Atlanta a more just place.

He has taught “Race & Riots in American History, 1600—present” as the History Prize Instructor at Harvard University. He also taught Introduction to African American History in the African & Afro-American Studies Department at Brandeis University. He is a member of the Graduate Tutorial Board in Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality and have led WGS junior tutorials on a range of topics including the gay liberation movement, Afrofuturism in literature, and HIV/AIDS treatment in Europe.

He has a B.A. in African American Studies & History from the University of Rochester and an A.M. in History from Harvard University. Before starting graduate school, he worked for three years at the Legal Aid Society of Rochester.