How To Cite Data and Grants-The Common Cold Project - Carnegie Mellon University

Supporting Grants

Citation Requirements

Publications using data made available by the Common Cold Project (CCP) must include appropriate citations to the agencies that provided funding both for the creation and support of the CCP website and for the conduct of the research that generated the data.   Here we provide a table indicating the funding sources for the CCP and for each study, as well as guidelines for citing those sources.

The methods section for your research product should include the following in-text information:

  • The data were collected by the Laboratory for the Study of Stress, Immunity, and Disease at Carnegie Mellon University under the directorship of Sheldon Cohen, PhD; and were accessed via the Common Cold Project website (www.commoncoldproject.com; grant number NCCIH AT006694).

The references section for your research product should include the following citation:

  • Laboratory for the Study of Stress, Immunity, and Disease. (2016). Common Cold Project. Retrieved from http://www.commoncoldproject.com

Finally, the acknowledgment section for your research project should include the following information:

  1. The data were collected by the Laboratory for the Study of Stress, Immunity, and Disease at Carnegie Mellon University under the directorship of Sheldon Cohen, PhD; and were accessed via the Common Cold Project website (www.commoncoldproject.com).
  2. The grant that supports the Common Cold Project  (NCCIH AT006694)
  3. The grant(s) that provided primary funding for that research study or studies whose data are used in your article
    • NIAID R01 AI23072 for BCS
    • NIMH MH50429 for PCS1 and PCS2
    • NHLBI HL65111 and HL65112 for PMBC
    • NIAID R01 AI066367 for PCS3
  4. The grant that supported clinical and regulatory assistance to the study
    • NIH 5M01 RR00056 for PCS1 and PCS2
    • NIH UL1 RR024153 and UL1 TR0005 for PCS3

Supplementary grants that supported the assessment of a specific measure used in the study(ies).  For example, genotyping and telomere length in PCS3 and glucocorticoid resistance in PMBC.  (See the Table for grant numbers).  Inclusion of these citations is appropriate only if your analysis includes variables derived from assessments that were supported by supplementary funding.

Below we present 2 sample acknowledgement sections that demonstrate how to appropriately cite relevant sources of research support.  Example 1 is from a paper we published on the role of parenthood in colds using data from PCS1, PCS2, and PMBC.  Example 2 is an acknowledgement section for a hypothetical paper that involves data from PMBC and PCS3, and incorporates measures that were funded by a supplementary grant.

Example 1:

 “The data used for this article were collected by the Laboratory for the Study of Stress, Immunity, and Disease at Carnegie Mellon University under the directorship of Sheldon Cohen, PhD; and were accessed via the Common Cold Project (CCP) website (www.commoncoldproject.com).  CCP data are made publically available through a grant from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (AT006694); the conduct of the studies was supported by grants from the National Institute of Mental Health (MH50429) and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (HL65111; HL65112); and secondary support was provided by a grant from the National Institutes of Health to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center General Clinical Research Center (NCRR/GCRC 5M01 RR00056).”

Example 2:

“The data used for this article were collected by the Laboratory for the Study of Stress, Immunity, and Disease at Carnegie Mellon University under the directorship of Sheldon Cohen, PhD; and were accessed via the Common Cold Project (CCP) website (www.commoncoldproject.com).  CCP data are made publically available through a grant from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (AT006694); the conduct of the studies was supported by grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (HL65111; HL65112) and National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (R01 AI066367); secondary support was provided by a grant from the National Institutes of Health to the University of Pittsburgh Clinical and Translational Science Institute (UL1 RR024153 and UL1 RT000005); and supplemental support was provided by John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Socioeconomic Status & Health.”

Table, Funding Sources for Common Cold Project and Each of the 5 Cold Studies

Funding Agency/ Institute

Award Number

Project Title

Award Period

Project

Data Aggregation Project:

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

R01 AT006694-01

Social Ties and Health: Aggregating Data from Five Viral-Challenge Trials

2011-2016

Common Cold Project

British Cold Study:

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

R01 AI23072

Social Support and Susceptibility to Infection

1986-1991

BCS

Office of Naval Research (ONR)

N00014-88-K-0063

Behavior, Immunologic Response, and Upper Respiratory Infection

1988-1990

BCS Supplement:

Rubella and HSV-1 antibody

PCS1 and PCS2 Studies:

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

R01 MH50429

Stress and Susceptibility to Infectious Disease;

Social Support, Stress, and Susceptibility to Infection

1993-1997; 1997-2003

PCS1 and PCS2

National Institutes of Health; grant awarded to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center General Clinical Research Center (now Clinical and Translational Science Institute)

5M01 RR00056

Secondary Funding

1993-2003

PCS1 and PCS2

PMBC Study:

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

P01 HL65111 and P01 HL65112

Mind-Body Center:  Understanding Shared Psychobiological Pathways, Project 1: Psychobiological Pathways: Risk for Respiratory Illness

1999-2004

PMBC

John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Socioeconomic Status & Health

Supplemental Funding

PMBC Supplement:

Glucorticoid resistance data, Reactive Responding Scale, Subjective Socioeonomic Status Ladder, salivary cortisol, urinary catecholamines

National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Support Grant; grant awarded to the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute

P30CA047904

Secondary Funding

2000-2004

PMBC catecholamines; cortisol; nasal, serum, and stimulated cytokines

PCS3 Study:

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

R01 AI066367

Social and Psychological Risk for Infectious Illness

2005-2011

PCS3

Pennsylvania Department of Health through a Commonwealth Enhancement Grant

08-01-2

Genetic Vulnerabilities to Stress-Elicited Risk for Upper Respiratory Infectious Illness (pdf; starts on p. 7)

2008-2011

PCS3 Supplement:

Genotyping, cytokines and cortisol receptors

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

RC1AT005799

(Challenge Grant)

Stress, Cellular Aging and Susceptibility to Infectious Disease

2009-2011

PCS3 Supplement:

Oxidative stress and telomere length 

John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Socioeconomic Status & Health

Supplemental Funding

PCS3 Supplement:

Cellular aging and genotyping

National Institutes of Health; grant awarded to the University of Pittsburgh Clinical and Translational Science Institute

UL1 RR024153 and UL1 TR000005

Secondary Funding

2005-2011

PCS3