Research-Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences - Carnegie Mellon University

The Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences is at the center of some of Carnegie Mellon University’s most thrilling and innovative research.

We have developed computer models that can help diagnose brain dysfunctions and can identify a person’s thoughts and emotions; educational software that has raised student achievement in underperforming school districts; and web-based tools for citizens to use to deliberate issues that affect their communities.

For in-depth examples of recent Dietrich College research, check out some of the videos below.

brain autismBrain Representations of Social Thoughts Accurately Predict Autism Diagnosis
Led by Psychology Professor Marcel Just, CMU researchers have created brain-reading techniques that use neural representations of social thoughts to predict autism diagnoses with 97 percent accuracy, establishing the first biologically based diagnostic tool that measures a person's thoughts to detect the disorder.



classroomsHeavily Decorated Classrooms Disrupt Attention and Learning in Young Children
Maps, number lines, shapes, artwork and other materials tend to cover elementary classroom walls. However, new research& shows that too much of a good thing may be bad because heavily decorated classrooms end up disrupting attention and learning in young children.




dialectPittsburghese: The Story of a Dialect
What's in a word? Plenty, if you're from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where phrases like "Yinz going dahntahn to watch dem Stillers?" are symbols of local identity.








cohenResearchers Identify Biological Marker That Predicts Susceptibility to the Common Cold
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have identified a biological marker in the immune system that -- beginning at about age 22 -- predicts our ability to fight off the common cold.




To watch more videos, visit Dietrich College’s YouTube channel.