2014-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University

2014

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Awards Data Science Grant to Carnegie Mellon Researcher

Carl KingsfordCarl Kingsford, associate professor in Carnegie Mellon University's Lane Center for Computational Biology, has received a five-year, $1.5 million grant to support his efforts to develop efficient new methods for searching the massive amounts of DNA and RNA sequencing data now available worldwide. MORE
Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Big Factories Won't Solve High Cost of Electric Vehicles, Carnegie Mellon Researchers Say

Nissan Leaf Battery PackCarnegie Mellon researchers have found that the cost savings associated with manufacturing a high volume of batteries for electric vehicles may be nearly exhausted. Mass production lowers cost, say the researchers — but only up to a point. MORE
Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Information Networking Institute Student Receives Full Scholarship To Study Information Security

Hana HabibHana Habib, a first-year graduate student in the INI's Information Technology-Information Security program, has received a scholarship from the INI and the Alta Associates Executive Women's Forum (EWF) on Information Security, Risk Management and Privacy.
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Friday, October 17, 2014

Unifying the Mind: Carnegie Mellon’s David Danks Outlines New Cognitive Architecture To Explain How Thought Process Works

David DanksIn “Unifying the Mind: Cognitive Representation as Graphical Models,” Danks outlines a new cognitive architecture that explains two aspects of the human thought process: the ability to pay attention to only things that matter; and to use many different types of cognition to learn and reason about our world. MORE
Friday, October 17, 2014

CMU To Host Second Annual Nationwide High School Computer Security Contest, Oct. 27-Nov. 7

The PicoCTF competition challenges both novices and experts through a "Capture the Flag" (CTF) interactive game, in which participants capture virtual "flags" by reverse engineering, breaking, hacking or decrypting challenges. Unlike traditional exams or courses, the contest offers open-ended problems that can be solved in many ways, usually requiring independent research and encouraging student exploration. MORE
Friday, October 17, 2014

CMU Research Shows Highly Competitive Elections Create Extremely Polarizing Politics

Researchers at CMU's Tepper School of Business have studied voter behavior and found that when contests are perceived to be highly competitive, voters on both sides of the political spectrum tend to favor candidates who are more strongly conservative or liberal, contradicting conventional wisdom. MORE