News Brief: Carnegie Mellon's Philip LeDuc Selected a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

News Brief: Carnegie Mellon's Philip LeDuc Selected a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers

Contact: Tara Moore / 412-268-9673 / tararaemoore@cmu.edu

Phil LeDucPITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University Mechanical Engineering Professor Philip LeDuc has been selected a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

ASME is an international society with more than 140,000 members around the world. Its goal is to serve the global community through advancing and applying engineering principals to the problems that face our world today.

Less than 3 percent of ASME's members have been awarded the prestigious title of fellow. ASME fellows must have 10 or more years of active practice in the field of engineering, as well as 10 years of active corporate membership in ASME. LeDuc was nominated by other ASME members and fellows for his excellence in research, education and service. His fellowship was awarded by the ASME Committee of Past Presidents.

LeDuc also is a fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMS) and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). He also has received many other prestigious awards, including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Award and a Beckman Young Investigator Award.

LeDuc's research focuses on the possibilities of merging mechanical engineering and biology. He attempts to look at biological processes through a mechanical lens, thereby changing the way we tackle biological issues such as nutrition, bioenergy and disease.  

"The same way Ford would take his pieces and put together the Model T, I'm interested in how I can take pieces and put together an artificial cell that actually has functional behaviors," LeDuc said.

LeDuc founded and directs the Carnegie Mellon Center for the Mechanics and Engineering of Cellular Systems (CMECS), which brings together educators and researchers from across the scientific disciplines to focus their expertise on the questions of cellular mechanics.

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Philip LeDuc, pictured above, focuses on the possibilities of merging mechanical engineering and biology. He attempts to look at biological processes through a mechanical lens, thereby changing the way we tackle biological issues such as nutrition, bioenergy and disease.