Carnegie Mellon University

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Explore student groups related to International Relations and Politics

Women in International Security (WIIS)

Women In International Security (WIIS) is the premier global network dedicated to advancing the leadership and professional development of women in the field of international peace and security. WIIS (pronounced ‘wise’) sponsors leadership, training, and capacity-building programs as well as substantive events focused on current policy problems. WIIS also supports research projects and policy engagement initiatives on critical international security issues, including the nexus between gender and security. WIIS-CMU is administratively housed in IPS but membership is open to the CMU community.   

CMU Chapter Mission:

  • To elevate the voices of women, LGBTQIA+ and gender non-conforming persons in the international security space.
  • Work toward diversifying speakers and programming related to international security, politics, and history by committing to: 
    • thresholds for inclusion with regard to programming, and;
    • intersectionality and reserving platforms for groups traditionally underrepresented in the field.
  • Encourage other departments at the university to diversify their programming.
  • Encourage faculty in relevant fields to diversify their curricula.
  • Provide training for students and faculty to diversify their citations and sources in their research. 
  • Produce a quarterly newsletter including virtual workshops and podcasts promoting the work of women, LGBTQA+ and gender non-conforming persons and announcing upcoming programming and professional development opportunities. 
  • Develop programming and mentoring opportunities for students particularly related to professional development in international security.

How can I get involved?

  1. General interest: Join our e-mail list for updates on events (CMU and Global), job/internship opportunities, and more!  We will also post about membership once we have been established in SLICE. Social media too, once active.
  2. Volunteer to Lead! Help make the WIIS-CMU chapter impactful across campus and the Pittsburgh area!  E-mail Kelly Wadsworth directly if you’re interested. You can give as much or little time as you have!

We will be recruiting student leaders and committee members to help with the following student-run committees for AY 21-22:

  • Leadership Team– Provide overall leadership and direction to the club organization and committees; Establishes short- and long- range objectives and goals in conjunction with IPS advising staff; schedule general and leadership meetings and take/distribute notes
  • Programming Committee –Propose speakers and event ideas, work with IPS staff to create/coordinate/publicize WIIS chapter and co-sponsored events, including networking and professional development events 
  • Communications/ Membership Committee–Manage WIIS-CMU social media accounts and newsletter, create WIIS-CMU blog/webpage, manage membership lists, recruitment events (tabling, etc), and help Programming Committee publicize events
  • Research/Curriculum Committee –Collect and publish member research papers on the WIIS website,compile and promote resources for CMU faculty teaching in international security related fields to elevate the voices of women, LGBTQIA+ and gender non-conforming persons in the international security space. Post on our websites for use by WIIS members as well.

For more information about student groups at Carnegie Mellon, check out The Bridge.

Alexander Hamilton Society

The Carnegie Mellon University chapter of the Alexander Hamilton Society is a non-partisan and student-led foreign affairs organization, and is one of more than university and professional chapters nationwide. For more information, contact Millie Zhang.

The Triple Helix

Carnegie Mellon University’s reputation is one of drama, engineering, and computer science. While each field is unique, they intersect in one way: public policy. Theater shines light on societal grievances; engineers build the necessary infrastructure for public project; and computer scientists drive decision-makers with data and machine learning.

In short, The Triple Helix recognizes that public policy is universal. Beyond protests and petitions, Carnegie Mellon students need a forum to discuss, reflect, agree and disagree, and ultimately write on public policies. In practice, the Triple Helix bridges that gap in a few ways.

Mainly, we publish articles on topics ranging from CRISPR, Big Tech, national security, and Bitcoin, so Carnegie Mellon students better understand their peers.

As well, we conduct interviews with experts on issues like military spending and economic policy. We talk to CMU researchers about the implications of the incredible work they do. In the future, we hope to host in-person events and build member development for those interested in careers in public policy. Contact chapter president Sam Abodo for more information.