Carnegie Mellon University

Scottish Recipes

As a graduate of CMU, you are now a Loyal Scot for life. Embrace your new Scottish heritage and try your hand at a few of the traditional recipes below to impress your family with Scottish-themed bites as you celebrate during the Virtual Conferral of Degrees! And don't forget to show us what you're making by using #CMUgrad and #TartanProud on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Shortbread is a traditional Scottish biscuit (cookie), widely associated with celebratory occasions. If you're looking for a challenge, shape yours into a Scotty Dog!

Ingredients

4 oz. sieved plain flour
2 oz. castor sugar
4 oz. butter
2 oz. rice flour or ground rice

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F.
  2. Combine flours and sugar in a mixing bowl.
  3. Work in butter until the dough is the consistency of short-crust.
  4. Sprinkle board with rice flour. Turn dough on the board and knead till smooth.
  5. Cut into portions and shape into rounds. This amount will make four small rounds.
  6. Place on greaseproof paper in a baking tin. Prick with a fork. 
  7. Place in oven.  When the cakes begin to color (from 20 to 30 minutes), lower the heat.
  8. Allow to cool in the tin.

This recipe is provided by Margaret Fairlie in her book Traditional Scottish Cookery, 1973.

Clootie is a traditional Scottish term for a piece of cloth, rag or clothing. The Clootie Dumpling is wrapped in cloth as it boils.

Ingredients

1 lb. self-rising flour
4 oz. fresh breadcrumbs
4 oz. sugar
4 oz. shredded suet
½ tsp. salt
1 tsp. mixed spice
1 apple, grated
8 oz. currants
12 oz. raisins
½ pint milk
1 tbsp. treacle

Method
  1. Mix flour, breadcrumbs, sugar, shredded suet, salt, and mixed spice.
  2. Add grated apple, currants, and raisins. Mix well.
  3. Stir in milk and treacle until well blended.
  4. Scald cloth in boiling water, dust with flour.
  5. Place mixture on cloth. Tie securely, leaving room to swell.
  6. Have ready a saucepan of boiling water. Place a plate on the bottom of the pan and put the pudding on it. Boil for 3 to 4 hours. Never allow water to drop below half the depth of the pudding. Have a kettle of boiling water handy and add some to the pan about every hour.
  7. When dumpling is ready, remove cloth gently and dry pudding off in the oven. Serve with custard if liked.

This recipe is provided by Margaret Fairlie in her book Traditional Scottish Cookery, 1973.

This layered dessert is sure to please! Test your creativity by swapping jam flavors and fruits!

Ingredients

1 sponge cake
Raspberry jam
1 tin peaches
A little sherry
½ pt. custard
¼ pt. cream
Glacé cherries

Method
  1. Spread the sponge with jam and put it in a large, clear glass bowl.
  2. Drain juice from peaches and mix with a little sherry. Pour over sponge.
  3. Arrange the peaches over the sponge.
  4. Cover with a layer of custard, then top with whipped cream.
  5. Decorate with cherries.

This recipe is provided by Margaret Fairlie in her book Traditional Scottish Cookery, 1973.

Another dessert featuring multiple delicious layers, the traditional Scottish Cranachan was originally enjoyed in mid-summer in celebration of the raspberry harvest. Simple to make, this treat utilizes some of Scotland's most notable ingredients, including whisky, oats, honey and raspberries.

Ingredients

1/3 cup (2 oz.)  and 1/4 cup (1 1/2 oz.)  steel cut/pinhead oats
1/3 cup (3 oz.) Scotch whisky
2 cups (12 oz.) fresh raspberries
3 tbsp. Scotch whisky
3 tbsp. organic raw honey
2 tsp. sugar
2 cups of organic heavy whipping cream

Method

  1. The night before you'd like to eat these, toast 1/3 cup of oats in a heavy pan.
  2. Place oats in a bowl with 1/3 cup of whisky.  Cover and let stand overnight.
  3. The next morning, toast the second batch of oats as you did the first batch.  Remove from heat and set aside.
  4. Set aside a few raspberries to use later while decorating your dessert.  Crush the rest in a bowl.
  5. Sprinkle crushed raspberries with 2 tsp. of sugar, 1 tbsp. of honey and 1tbsp. of whisky.  Mix well and set aside.
  6. Whip the cream until it starts to thicken.
  7. Add 2 tbsp. of honey and 2 tbsp. of whisky, continuing to whip until stiff peaks form.
  8. Fold the whisky-soaked oats into the whipped cream.
  9. Now you're ready to assemble! Place a spoonful of the raspberries at the bottom of a glass, followed by a similar amount of the whipped cream.  Sprinkle with oats, and then repeat!  Top with fresh raspberries.

This recipe is provided by christinascucina.com. 

This Scottish tart takes its name from a small village in the south of Scotland and is reminiscent of a pecan pie in texture and flavor.

Ingredients 

2 eggs
4 oz. melted butter
6 oz. soft brown sugar
1 tbsp. vinegar
8 oz. mixed fruit
2 oz. chopped walnuts
Shortcrust pastry  (see recipe below)

Method

  1. Beat the eggs, add the melted butter, sugar, and vinegar. Mix well, then add mixed fruit and nuts.

  2. Prepare the patty tins (or muffin tin).

  3. Roll the pastry out on a lightly floured board to 1/8” thickness.

  4. Cut into rounds with a fluted cutter.

  5. Line the patty pans with the rounds and put a heaped teaspoon of fruit mixture in each. Bake in a fairly hot oven (375 F) for 20 to 25 minutes.

Yields 2.5 dozen.

Shortcrust Pastry

Ingredients

8 oz. plain flour
A pinch of salt
2 oz. margarine
2 oz. lard
Cold water

Method

  1. Sift the flour and salt into a bowl.
  2. Rub in the fat with the fingertips till the mixture is like fine breadcrumbs.
  3. Add the water slowly to make a fairly firm dough.
  4. Turn on to a floured board and knead lightly.
  5. Roll out and use as required.

This recipe is provided by Margaret Fairlie in her book Traditional Scottish Cookery, 1973.

Tattie is a Scottish term for potatoes. These scones are reminiscent of a potato pancake and are often served with sausage, eggs or other breakfast foods.

Ingredients

1 lb. potatoes (cooked and mashed)
1 oz. butter (melted; plus extra for greasing)
1/2 tsp. salt
1 medium egg
4 oz. flour (plus a little extra for rolling out)
1 tsp. baking powder

Method

  1. Heat oven to 395 F.
  2. Place mashed potatoes in a bowl and add all other ingredients.  Mix to form a sticky dough.
  3. Roll dough on a floured surface to approximately 1/2 in. thickness.
  4. Cut dough into saucer-sized rounds, then cut each round into four equal wedges.
  5. Grease a baking sheet with butter and bake the scones for 15 minutes, or until golden brown.
  6. Scones can also be cooked on the stovetop using a griddle or heavy-based pan.  Pan fry for five minutes per side, or until golden brown.
  7. Serve with butter and eat warm.

This recipe is provided by thespruceeats.com.

Similar to a flatbread or biscuit, these traditional cakes are documented in Scottish culture as far back as 43 AD. They are quick and easy to prepare, make a delicious snack or round out any breakfast!

Ingredients

4 oz. medium oatmeal (plus extra for kneading)
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1 pinch salt
2 tsp. fat (goose or bacon are great options, melted)
1 tbsp. hot water

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 F.
  2. In a large bowl, mix oatmeal, salt and baking soda.
  3. Drizzle in the fat and stir vigorously until a thick paste forms.
  4. Add hot water and mix again.
  5. Cut the paste into two small balls.
  6. Sprinkle a work surface with oatmeal and roll each ball to coat and prevent sticking.
  7. Knead each ball for a few minutes until the mixture begins to dry and stops sticking to the surface.
  8. Roll each ball into a roughly 1/4 in. thick disc, then cut into quarters.
  9. Place on a greased baking sheet and bake for 30 minutes or until they brown at the edges.
  10. Alternatively, the oatcakes can be cooked in a hot frying pan, three minutes per side.
  11. Serve the oatcakes warm or cool.

This recipe is provided by thespruceeats.com.

A Scottish twist on a classic breakfast, use this recipe as a guide or experiment with your own toppings!

Ingredients

Oatcakes (recipe above)
Smoked Salmon
Cream Cheese

Method

  1. Top your oatcakes with a thin layer of cream cheese.
  2. Lay the smoked salmon on top.
  3. Enjoy with horseradish, cucumber, red onion or anything you like!

Stovies, or "bits from the stove" are potato-based stews, perfect for getting rid of leftovers! The version below uses leftover vegetables and roast beef, but you're encouraged to substitute for whatever you like!

Ingredients

1 tbsp. lard (or beef dripping)
2 medium onions (or 1 large onion, skinned and roughly diced)
Optional: 4 tbsps. dark beer (or stout)
4 ounces roast beef (or lamb, cold and diced)
1 1/2 lbs. potatoes (washed, peeled, and cut into quarters)
10 oz. beef stock (or lamb stock or leftover gravy)
Vegetables (any that you have leftover from the day before)
Salt (to taste)
Pepper (to taste)

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 375 F.
  2. Melt lard or dripping in a large, oven-safe pot on the stove over medium heat.
  3. Saute onions until soft.
  4. If using, add the beer and turn up the heat to allow the alcohol to burn off. About two minutes.
  5. Add the meat and stir well.
  6. Add the potatoes in layers, seasoning each layer with salt and pepper as you go and before adding the next layer.
  7. Pour over the stock or gravy (or any combination of both).
  8. Cover with a lid and cook in the oven for 45-50 minutes.  Check occasionally and add additional stock if it begins to boil dry.
  9. Ten minutes before the end of cooking, add any leftover vegetables and stir.
  10. Cover with a lid and cook for another ten minutes.
  11. Serve with oatcakes (recipe above) and enjoy!

This recipe is provided by thespruceeats.com.