Carnegie Mellon University

Daniel Silverman

Daniel Silverman

Postdoctoral Fellow, Institute for Politics and Strategy

Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Daniel Silverman is a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Politics and Strategy at Carnegie Mellon University. His research focuses on political conflict and violence, public opinion, and the politics of the Middle East and wider Islamic world. Daniel is especially interested in how people form attitudes and beliefs in situations of violent conflict.

His doctoral dissertation at the Ohio State University examines why civilians in conflict settings often hold wildly divergent beliefs about the “facts on the ground” in the dispute – that is, about what is happening in the fighting. Focusing on the U.S. drone campaign in Pakistan and the Iraq War, he develops an original theory of belief formation in war and supports it with a mixture of fieldwork, existing survey data, an original national survey experiment, and micro-level violent event data from the two cases. Ultimately, the project illuminates both the depths – and limits – of lies in war.

Daniel also has ongoing research projects on Islam and politics, U.S. foreign policy attitudes, the attributes of non-state resistance leaders, and the sources of conspiracy theories. Daniel’s work is published in academic journals such as the Journal of Conflict Resolution, Political Research Quarterly and Studies in Conflict & Terrorism.  Before coming to CMU, Daniel earned his Ph.D. in Political Science at the Ohio State University and B.A. in Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania.

Publications

Kaltenthaler, Karl, Daniel Silverman, and Munqith Dagher. "Identity, Ideology, and Information: The Sources of Iraqi Support for the Islamic State." Studies in Conflict & Terrorism (2018)https://doi.org/10.1080/1057610X.2018.1433447

Silverman, Daniel. "What Shapes Civilian Beliefs about Violent Events? Experimental Evidence from Pakistan." Journal of Conflict Resolution (2018). https://doi.org/10.1177/0022002718791676 .