Carnegie Mellon University

Midterm Elections and the Impact of Redistricting

with Professor Richard Pildes

Thursday, October 13, 2022
5:30-6:30 PM ET

Register to attend.

In the lead-up to midterm elections on November 8, please join us for a conversation with the Sudler Family Professor of Constitutional Law at New York University, Richard Pildes. Professor Pildes has recently been appointed to the President's Commission on the Supreme Court of the United States by President Biden. He is one of the country’s leading experts on legal issues concerning American democracy and the structure of American government, including voting rights, elections, and campaigns, as well as separation of powers, administrative law, and constitutional law more generally.

Richard H. Pildes is the Sudler Family Professor of Constitutional Law at New York University School of Law, an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Law Institute, and a Guggenheim and Carnegie fellow.  A law clerk to Justice Thurgood Marshall at the United States Supreme Court, Professor Pildes also has successfully argued cases before the Court and numerous federal courts of appeals.  President Biden recently appointed him to the President’s Commission on the Supreme Court of the United States.  He is one of the country’s leading experts on legal issues concerning American democracy and the structure of American government, including voting rights, elections, and campaigns, as well as separation of powers, administrative law, and constitutional law more generally.  His co-authored casebook, The Law of Democracy:  Legal Regulation of The Political Process, helped create the study of democracy as an academic field in the law schools; he has also co-authored or edited volumes entitled When Elections Go Bad and The Future of the Voting Rights Act.  As a public commentator, he was an election analyst for CNN in the 2020 election and for NBC in the 2000 election.  Some of his major recent academic articles include Political Fragmentation and the Decline of American Government; Participation and Polarization; Populism and Institutional Design: Methods of Selecting Candidates for Chief Executive; Romanticizing Democracy, Political Fragmentation, and the Decline of American Government; Law and the President; Why the Center Does Not Hold:  The Causes of Hyperpolarized Democracy in America; Is the Supreme Court a “Majoritarian” Institution; The Constitutionalization of Democratic Politics; and Separation of Parties, Not Powers.