Vehicle Electrification Group - Carnegie Mellon University

Carnegie Mellon Vehicle Electrification Group

The Vehicle Electrification Group at Carnegie Mellon University was founded by Professor Jeremy Michalek and Professor Jay Whitacre in 2009 to study electrified vehicles, including hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles. Research thrust areas include:

  1. Vehicle and battery systems assessment, design, optimization, and integration with the electrical grid
  2. Life-cycle economic, environmental, and security implications of electrified vehicles
  3. Public policy evaluation

Top News

  • Dec 2013 - Study: EVs could be cheaper to recharge if electricity providers control charging speed, published in Applied Energy [study] [press release] [NYTimes].
  • Nov 2013 - Video: "Do hybrid and plug-in cars really save the environment?" [video]
  • Nov 2013 - Video: "Energy storage and conversion: the next generation" [video]
  • Nov 2013 - Study: Limited residential parking suitable for installing chargers may pose a serious barrier to mainstream adoption of EVs, published in Transportation Research Part D [study] [press release] [NYTimes].
  • July 2013 - Video: 2-minutes with Prof. Michalek on vehicle electrification strategy [video].
  • July 2013 - Opinion: Vehicle electrification strategy in Carnegie Mellon Today [article].
  • June 2013 - Study: Hybrid and plug-in vehicles reduce cost and emissions for stop-and-go driving, but for highway cruising they cost more with little environmental benefit, published in Energy Policy [study] [press release].
  • Jan 2013 - Interview: Prof. Michalek interviewed in The Daily Beast about hybrid and electric vehicles [interview].
  • Jan 2013 - Study: Investment in public charging infrastructure is an expensive way to save gasoline, published in Energy Policy [study] [press release].
  • Sept 2011 - Study: U.S. policy favors large-battery plug-in vehicles, but vehicles with smaller batteries offer more environmental benefits per dollar spent, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [study] [policy brief] [press release] [magazine article].


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