Carnegie Mellon University

Professional Achievement

Dickson Prize

This award is presented annually to the person who has been judged by Carnegie Mellon to have made the most progress in the scientific field in the United States. At Carnegie Mellon, the field of science is interpreted to include the natural sciences, engineering, computer science and mathematics. Learn more about the Dickson Prize.

François M.M. Morel
Albert G. Blanke Professor of Geosciences
Princeton University
2013

Marvin L. Cohen (Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics)
University Professor of Physics
University of California, Berkeley
Senior Faculty Scientist
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
2011

David A. Tirrell (Chemistry & Chemical Engineering)
Ross McCollum-William H. Corcoran Professor of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering
California Institute of Technology
2010

Saul Perlmutter (Physics)
Professor of Physics
University of California, Berkeley
Senior Scientist
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
2009

Richard M. Karp (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
University of California, Berkeley
Research Scientist
International Computer Science Institute
2008

Jean M. J. Fréchet (Organic Chemistry and Chemical Engineering)
Henry Rapoport Chair of Organic Chemistry and Professor of Chemical Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
Director of the Organic and Macromolecular Facility for the Molecular Foundry
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
2007

Jared M. Diamond (Geography, Ecology, Evolutionary Biology)
Professor of Geography
University of California, Los Angeles
2006

David Haussler (Computational Learning Theory and Bioinformatics)
Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator
Director, Center for Biomedical Science and Engineering
University of California, Santa Cruz
Scientific Co-Director
The California Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Research
Professor of Biomolecular Engineering
University of California, Santa Cruz
2005

George M. Whitesides (Materials Chemistry)
Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor
Harvard University
2004

Marc W.  Kirschner (Cell Biology)
Head, Department of Systems Biology
Harvard Medical School
2003

Robert Langer (Chemical and Biomedical Engineering)
The Kenneth J. Germeshausen Professor of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
2002

Carver Mead (Microelectronics and Engineering)
The Gordon and Betty Moore Professor of Engineering and Applied Science (Emeritus)
California Institute of Technology
2001
            
Alexander Pines (Chemistry)
The Glenn T. Seaborg Professor of Chemistry
University of California, Berkeley
2000

Howard Raiffa (Decision Sciences)
Professor of Managerial Economics (Emeritus)
Harvard University
1999

Peter Shor (Quantum Computing)
Principal Research Scientist
AT&T Shannon Laboratory, Florham Park, New Jersey
1998

Walter Alvarez (Stratigraphy and Earth History)
Professor of Geology and Geophysics
University of California, Berkeley
1997

John P. Hirth (Structural Defects in Phase Transformations)
Battelle Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and Materials Engineering
Washington State University
1996

Dr. Leland Hartwell (Cell Biology)
Senior Advisor, Scientific Affairs
Molecular Medicine Division
Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center of Seattle and Professor of Genetics
University of Washington
1995

Raymond Kurzweil (Artificial Intelligence and Kurzweil Reader)
Kurzweil Technologies
1994

Vera Rubin (Astrophysics)
Carnegie Institution of Washington
1993

Paul C. Lauterbur (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)*
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
1992

David Botstein (Genetics)
Stanford University
1991

F. Sherwood Rowland (Atmospheric Carbons)*
University of California, Irvine
1990

Richard E. Dickerson (Molecular Biology)
University of California, Los Angeles
1989

Joan Steitz (Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)
Yale School of Medicine
1998

Mitchell Feigenbaum (Physics)
Rockefeller University
1987
  
Benjamin Widom (Chemical Engineering, Physics and Chemistry)
Department of Chemistry
Cornell University
1986

Norman Davidson (Genetics, Biology and Chemistry)*
Department of Biology and Chemistry
California Institute of Technology
1985

Edward Fredkin (Computer Science)
Department of Computer Science
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
1983-84

Harden M. McConnell (Magnetic Resonance)
Department of Chemistry
Stanford University
1982

John Werner Cahn (Metallurgy)
Center for Materials Science
U.S. Department of Commerce
1980

Seymour Benzer (Genetics and Molecular Biology)*
Professor of Biology
California Institute of Technology
1978

John H. Sinfelt (Chemical Engineering)*
Research Scientist
Exxon
1977

David Geiger (Civil Engineering)*
Geiger Berger Associates
1974

Elias J. Corey (Organic Chemistry)
Department of Chemistry
Harvard University
1973

Francis L. Ver Snyder (Metallurgy)*
Materials Engineering and Research Laboratory
Pratt and Whitney Aircraft
1972

George E. Palade (Cell Biology)*
Department of Cell Biology
Rockefeller University
1971

Keith R. Porter (Cell Biology)*
Chairman, Department of Cellular, Molecular and Developmental Biology
University of Colorado
1971

Richard Bellman (Mathematics)*
Professor of Medicine, Electrical Engineering and Mathematics
University of Southern California, Los Angeles
1970

The Franklin Institute Awards

The Franklin Institute’s annual awards honor the greatest minds in science, engineering, technology and business. Recognizing these individuals is one way the institute preserves Benjamin Franklin's legacy. CMU has been home to eight Franklin Institute laureates. Learn more about The Franklin Institute Awards.

Edmund M. Clarke, School of Computer Science Faculty
2014 Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science 

Mark H. Kryder, College of Engineering Faculty
2014 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Electrical Engineering
Awarded jointly with Shunichi Iwasaki of Tohoku Institute of Technology  

Subra Suresh, CMU President
2013 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Mechanical Engineering 

John R. Anderson, Dietrich College/School of Computer Science Faculty
2011 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Computer and Cognitive Science

Takeo Kanade, School of Computer Science Faculty
2008 Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science

Robert H. Dennard, College of Engineering ’58
2007 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Electrical Engineering

Stuart K. Card, Tepper School ’70, Dietrich College ’78
2007 Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science

Shafi Goldwasser, Mellon College of Science ’79
2010 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Computer and Cognitive Science

Guggenheim Fellowships

Established in 1925 by former U.S. Senator and Mrs. Simon Guggenheim, in memory of their son John Simon Guggenheim, the fellowships honor "stellar achievement and exceptional promise for continued accomplishment" for those who "add to the educational, literary, artistic and scientific power of this country, and also to provide for the cause of better international understanding." Learn more about the Guggenheim Fellowships.

Mariana Achugar, Dietrich College Faculty
2009

Terrance Hayes, Dietrich College Former Faculty
2009

Alyosha (Alexei) Efros, School of Computer Science Faculty
2008

Honda Prize

Established in 1977 by the late Soichiro Honda, founder of Honda Motor Co., Ltd., the Honda Foundation annually recognizes an individual or group whose contributions may lead to the next generation in the field of eco-technology. Learn more about the Honda Prize.

Raj Reddy, School of Computer Science Faculty
2005

MacArthur Foundation Fellows

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation awards five-year, unrestricted fellowships to individuals of outstanding talent to pursue their own creative, intellectual and professional inclinations. Recipients may be writers, scientists, artists, social scientists, humanists, teachers, entrepreneurs, or those in other fields, with or without institutional affiliations. Learn more about the MacArthur Foundation Fellows.

Luis von Ahn, School of Computer Science Faculty, School of Computer Science '03 '05
2006

National Book Award

The mission of the National Book Foundation and the National Book Award is to celebrate the best of American literature, to expand its audience and enhance the cultural value of good writing in America. The annual award honors American writers in four categories: Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry and Young People’s Literature. Learn more about the National Book Award.

Terrance Hayes, Dietrich College Former Faculty
Poetry, "Lighthead" (Penguin Books)
2010

National Medal of Science

Created by Congress, this award honors individuals deserving of special recognition by reason of their outstanding contributions to knowledge in the physical, biological, mathematical, engineering, chemistry and social sciences. Carnegie Mellon has been home to two National Medal of Science recipients. Learn more about the National Medal of Science.

Allen Newell, School of Computer Science Former Faculty*
Mathematics and Computer Science, 1992

Herbert A. Simon, Dietrich College/School of Computer Science/Tepper School Former Faculty*
Behavioral and Social Science, 1986

National Medal of Technology and Innovation

Created by Congress, this award is presented to individuals, teams and companies for achievement in the innovation, development, commercialization and management of technology. Carnegie Mellon has been home to two National Medal of Technology and Innovation recipients. Learn more about the National Medal of Technology and Innovation.

Watts S. Humphrey, Software Engineering Institute Former Staff*
2005

Stephanie Kwolek, MM 1946
1996

Stockholm Prize in Criminology

Established in 2006, the Swedish Ministry of Justice annually recognizes an individual for outstanding achievements in criminological research or the application of research results by practitioners for the reduction of crime and the advancement of human rights. Learn more about the Stockholm Prize in Criminology.

Daniel S. Nagin, Heinz College Faculty, Tepper School '71, Heinz College '76
2014 

Alfred Blumstein, Heinz College Faculty
2007

Turing Award

Named for "the father of computer science," Alan Mathison Turing, the award is given to an individual selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community. It is considered to be the computing world's equivalent to the Nobel Prize and is awarded by the Association for Computing Machinery for contributions "of lasting and major technical importance to the computer field." Carnegie Mellon has been home to 12 Turing Award recipients. Learn more about the A.M. Turing Award.

Shafi Goldwasser, Mellon College of Science 1979
2012 

Les Valiant, School of Computer Science Former Faculty
2011

Edmund Clarke, School of Computer Science/College of Engineering Faculty                 
Awarded jointly with E. Allen Emerson and Josef Sifakis
2007

Manuel Blum, School of Computer Science Faculty                 
1995

Raj Reddy, School of Computer Science Faculty                 
Awarded jointly with Edward Feigenbaum (CIT/GSIA Alumnus)
1994

Edward Feigenbaum, College of Engineering 1956, Tepper School '60
Awarded jointly with Raj Reddy (SCS Faculty)
1994

Ivan Sutherland, College of Engineering 1959, Hon: CMU 2003, P: Mellon College of Science 1983, School of Computer Science: 2008
1988

Robert Floyd, School of Computer Science Former Faculty                  
1978

Dana Scott, Dietrich College/Mellon College of Science/School of Computer Science Faculty                 
Awarded jointly with Michael Rabin
1976

Allen Newell, School of Computer Science Former Faculty*
Awarded jointly with Herbert Simon, DC/School of Computer Science/TPR Faculty                  
1975

Herbert Simon, Dietrich College/School of Computer Science/Tepper School Former Faculty*
Awarded jointly with Allen Newell, School of Computer Science Former Faculty
1975

Alan Perlis, MCS 1942, School of Computer Science Former Faculty*                 
1966

Vannevar Bush Award

The National Science Board established the Vannevar Bush Award in 1980. Vannevar Bush was a prominent scientist, adviser to presidents and the force behind the establishment of the National Science Foundation. The annual award recognizes an individual who, through public service activities in science and technology, has made an outstanding "contribution toward the welfare of mankind and the nation." Learn more about the Vannevar Bush Award.

Raj Reddy, School of Computer Science Faculty
2006

*Denotes faculty/alumni who are deceased.

Contact Abby Simmons in Media Relations at abbysimmons@cmu.edu or 412-268-4290 with awards questions.