Genomics, Proteomics & Systems Biology-Department of Biological Sciences - Carnegie Mellon University

Genomics, Proteomics & Systems Biology

Ziv Bar-Joseph

Affiliated Biological Sciences Faculty

Dr. Bar-Joseph's primary research is in computational and systems biology. Machine learning and statistical algorithms are used to study time series expression experiments and to combine high throughput biological data sources to model biological networks.
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Dannie Durand

Associate Professor

The Durand group works in comparative genomics, focusing on the evolution of genome organization and functional diversity in vertebrates.
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Charles A. Ettensohn

Professor

The Ettensohn laboratory is part of a collaboration that recently sequenced and annotated the complete genome of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. The group is generating and analyzing other genomics-based resources from this and other echinoderm species. This information is being used to study how the program of embryonic development is encoded in the genome.
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N. Luisa Hiller

Assistant Professor

The Hiller group utilizes whole genome sequencing and genomic and transcriptomic profiles generated on genomic hybridization arrays to investigate strain evolution during isolated chronic infections and epidemics, as well as to functionally characterize selected genes.
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Veronica F. Hinman

Associate Professor

The Hinman laboratory studies evolution of developmental mechanisms using marine invertebrate embryo and larval models. Of particular interest are gene regulatory networks (GRNs), which are researched to discover essential features of animal development and gain a better understanding of how evolutionary changes are incorporated into developmental programs.
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Jeffrey O. Hollinger

Professor

The Hollinger group investigates molecular and cellular mechanisms in bone regeneration, with particular emphasis on clinical therapies.
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Jonathan W. Jarvik

Associate Professor

The Jarvik laboratory is developing high throughput methods for trapping genes and observing reporter-tagged gene products in mammalian cells.
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A. Javier López

Associate Professor

The Lopez laboratory is using bioinformatic and experimental approaches to study mechanisms of expression and evolutionary dynamics of large introns and also developing methods for global analysis of splicing intermediates.
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C. Joel McManus

Assistant Professor

The McManus lab studies the evolution of gene expression networks using high-throughput sequencing and comparative genomics approaches. We are particularly interested in how multi-layered expression networks change and in investigating the evolution of cross-talk between gene regulatory processes.
Faculty Webpage, Laboratory Website

Jonathan S. Minden

Professor

The Minden laboratory is developing new tools for comparative proteomics. One such method is Difference Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE), which is sold by Amersham (GE) Biosciences. Under current development are fluorescent gel imaging hardware and software. In addition, the Minden group has created a new company, Proteopure, to develop a universal protein preparation method for proteomics research.
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Aaron P. Mitchell

Professor

The Mitchell laboratory focuses on gene discovery methods that assign function to the C. albicans genome sequence and identify novel regulatory networks.
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Russell S. Schwartz

Professor

Russell Schwartz has been involved in many projects involving whole-genome analysis and data mining, and in addition to current projects in those areas, he is developing computational methods for simulating biochemistry within the cellular environment.
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Nathan N. Urban

Dr. Frederick A. Schwertz Distinguished Professor of Life Sciences

In the Urban laboratory researchers adopt a systems neuroscience approach to the study of the main and accessory olfactory systems in rodents. This work involves the combination of a variety of physiological, computational and behavioral techniques to answer questions about the representation and processing of odor-evoked activity linked to the generation of olfactory behavior.
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John L. Woolford

Acting Department Head and Professor

The Woolford lab is using state-of-the-art techniques for epitope tagging genes in the yeast genome and purifying multimolecular ribosome assembly complexes containing the tagged gene products. Copurifying proteins are identified by mass spectrometry. Data for populations of proteins in each pre-ribosome are being analyzed by computational methods to build models for the assembly of ribosomes in yeast.
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Eric Xing

Affiliated Biological Sciences Faculty

Eric Xing develops statistical models and machine learning algorithms for biological network inference and characterization, cis-regulatory module decoding, regulatory evolution modeling, quantitative trait locus mapping, genome polymorphism patterning, and population genetic analysis. He is also applying these quantitative approaches to investigate the mechanisms of breast cancer development and metazoan morphagenesis.
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