CMU is stimulating ideas at the World Economic Forum and shaping global, regional and industry agendas.


CMU is one of only 25 universities in the world, 12 in the U.S., that have been invited to join the Global University Leaders Forum (GULF). Business members of the Forum include the top 1,000 companies from around the world that drive the economy forward and collaborate on shaping global, regional and industry agendas.

Summer Davos 2016 - Tianjin, People's Republic of China

CMU Faculty Present at Annual Meeting of the New Champions | June 26-28

Carnegie Mellon University once again was on the global stage at the World Economic Forum's Annual Meeting of the New Champions. The Annual Meeting of the New Champions is the foremost global gathering of world thought leaders on innovation, science and technology, with added emphasis on emerging markets and entrepreneurship.

According to the World Economic Forum, The theme of this year's meeting, The Fourth Industrial Revolution and Its Transformational Impact, seeks to understand the velocity and extent with which the Fourth Industrial Revolution will impact our world and to identify the rules, values and governance structures necessary for humans to thrive in this new industrial era.

This year's meeting offered over 200 sessions with more than 1,700 participants representing 90 countries. Among the nearly 150 academic leaders in attendance, members of the CMU team participated in various demonstrations and presentations.

Members of the CMU delegation are:

Agenda: 3 Ways AI and Robotics will Transform Healthcare

robot and human holding hands

CNET: The Advent of Virtual Humans

Sara the AI

Sunday, June 26

Earth Time-Lapse: Exploring Emerging Megacities

Paul Dille

The world had only two megacities larger than 10 million in 1950; there will be at least 40 by 2025. Embark on a visual exploration that reveals the impact of expanding cities on our planet.

The session features high-resolution satellite images from NASA's Landsat Program, which provides the longest continuous global record of the Earth's surface.

Paul Dille, Senior Research Programmer and Analyst, Carnegie Mellon University

Reverse-Engineering the Brain: The Carnegie Mellon University IdeasLab

Artistic Representation of Reverse-Engineering the Brain

[click to enlarge]

How are advances in machine learning and artificial intelligence revealing the inner workings of the human brain? Discover and debate in the IdeasLab:

This session is filmed and will be available online at a later date.

Discussion Leaders:
Elissa Aminoff, Faculty, Carnegie Mellon University
Tai-Sing Lee, Professor, Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University
Byron Yu, Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering; Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University

Navigating the New World of Work

Justine Cassell

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is rapidly transforming work through increased human-machine collaboration, displacement of certain jobs and the creation of new types of work. How can we manage the employment landscape to create optimal results for society and business?

This session is for participants active or interested in the Forum's System Initiative on Shaping the Future of Education, Gender and Work.

Justine Cassell, Associate Dean, Technology, Strategy and Impact, School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University

Meet the Experts and Curators behind the Works in Progress Exhibition

The Works in Progress Exhibition explores the technological advances of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, inviting you to reflect on humankind's relationship with technology.

Meet the experts behind the exhibition in the Bio-Robots, Brain Hub, Collisions, Co-Workers, Humanoid Robots and Noah's Garden spaces. You can also join the curators of the exhibition on a walk that will introduce the thinking and objectives behind each exhibit.

Justine Cassell, Associate Dean, Technology, Strategy and Impact, School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University
Howard Choset, Professor, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University

Earth Time-Lapse: The Impact of the Anthropocene

Randy Sargent

From large-scale deforestation to melting ice caps, embark on a visual exploration that reveals the global impact of the Anthropocene on nature and the planet. The session features high-resolution satellite images from NASA's Landsat Program, which provides the longest continuous global record of the Earth's surface.

Randy Sargent, Senior Systems Scientist, Carnegie Mellon University

Forum Debate: Betting on Moon Shots

Panelist Martial Hebert

From asteroid mining to Hyperloop transport, companies are promoting futuristic technologies. Is the revival of corporate-led research helping or hindering scientific progress?

This session is part of the Forum Debate series on today's dilemmas in science, technology and innovation.

This session is webcast live.

Panelist: Martial Hebert, Director, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University

Ask About: Perception and Memory

Elissa Aminoff

Our memories of the past can affect how we perceive new experiences, which in turn affects our memories of the past.

Come to the Brain Hub in the Exploration zone on Level 2 for a conversation on the complex relationship between perception and memory with psychologist Elissa Aminoff, faculty, Carnegie Mellon University.

What If: Our Virtual Life Overtakes Our Physical Reality?

The advent of virtual and augmented reality is igniting hopes and fears about the impact of digital technology on empathy and self-reflection. What if schools, workplaces and daily social interactions are primarily virtual?

Explore the possible, plausible and probable impacts of the digitization of human experience. This session was developed in partnership with TIME. This session is webcast live.

Justine Cassell, Associate Dean, Technology, Strategy and Impact, School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University

Earth Time-Lapse: Regions on the Rise

From resource extraction to massive infrastructure projects, embark on a visual exploration that reveals how the world's fastest-growing regions are transforming the surface of our planet.

The session features high-resolution satellite images from NASA's Landsat Program, which provides the longest continuous global record of the Earth's surface.

Randy Sargent, Senior Systems Scientist, Carnegie Mellon University

Monday, June 27

Ask About: Brain-Machine Interfaces

Byron Yu

Our ability to read information from and write information into the brain is rapidly improving.

Come to the Brain Hub in the Exploration zone on Level 2 for a conversation with neuroscientist and engineer Byron Yu on new technologies and applications that interface with the brain.

Byron Yu, Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering; Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University

Ask About: Vision

Tai-Sing Lee

Neuroscientists believe that, by studying how vision works in the brain, we can develop new types of artificial intelligence.

Tai-Sing Lee, Professor, Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University

Science in Depth: From Biology to Robotics and Back

Martial Hebert

Explore how roboticists and computer scientists are simultaneously advancing the frontiers of robotics, biology and human psychology.

Join this session to learn more about the technology and technologists behind the Works in Progress Exhibition.

Justine Cassell, Associate Dean, Technology, Strategy and Impact, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University
Howard Choset, Professor, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University

Facilitated by: Martial Hebert, Director, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University

Tuesday, June 28

Science in Depth: Reverse Engineering the Brain

Tai-Sing Lee, Elissa Aminoff, Byron Yu

How are advances in machine learning and artificial intelligence revealing the inner workings of the human brain?

Discover and debate:

Panelists: Elissa Aminoff, Faculty, Carnegie Mellon University
Tai-Sing Lee, Professor, Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University
Byron Yu, Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering; Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University

Facilitated by: Martial Hebert, Director, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University

Education for a New Age

From complex problem solving to critical thinking and creativity, how can education form critical skills and competencies for a new machine age?

Dimensions to be addressed:

Moderated by: Justine Cassell, Associate Dean, Technology, Strategy and Impact, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University

Communities

Young Global Scientists

Each year, 40 scientists under the age of 40 are selected to participate alongside business and political leaders in the Annual Meeting of the New Champions in China (Summer Davos). These scientists (PDF) are selected from all regions of the world and from a wide range of disciplines to contribute their scientific perspective and deliver the most up-to-date trends from various fields of science. CMU currently has seven Young Global Scientist awardees. This year's awardees include Elissa Aminoff, CMU faculty and Byron Yu, associate professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering and associate professor, Biomedical Engineering.