Carnegie Mellon University
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Your Third and Fourth Years

The third and fourth year curricula are structured to so that you can refine and advance your skills and expertise, take deeper dives into contemporary issues and debate them with your classmates and instructors, and pursue substantive economics research. Your third and fourth years in our program are also a time when you can customize your experience with your choice of major and elective courses (and concentrations).

In your fourth year, the economics curriculum culminates with the senior research requirement.

Third and Fourth Year Highlights

Tepper Econ T-shirt

Concentrations

Knowing that students choose electives based on interest and career aspirations, we have structured sets of courses as concentrations areas. Concentrations are optional; they are intended to guide students so that they may explore a group of aligned topics and/or develop a specialized and advanced skill set appropriate for a desired career. The concentration areas are Advanced Quantitative Methods, Global Change and Disruption, Global Markets and Finance, Market Design and the Digital Economy, Policy and Social Impact, and Strategy and Markets.

Explore Concentrations

Sign in Tepper Quad

Research

Students are surrounded by individuals and teams who are constantly pushing the boundaries of human knowledge. In the Undergraduate Economics Program, students are not only encouraged to participate in research but are provided with the opportunities and means by which to do so. There are many ways to become involved with economics; you might work as research assistants for a faculty member, enroll in research methods courses, work on research projects in economics electives, or pursue your own research projects.  

Explore research

Senior presentation

Senior Year Work

The economics curriculum culminates in the senior year with a research requirement achieved through either the one-semester Senior Project course where students work in small groups or through the two-semester Senior Honors Program in Economics where students work independently.