Carnegie Mellon University

Elizabeth Campbell

Elizabeth L. Campbell

Ph.D. Student, Tepper School of Business

Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Areas of Study

Organizational Behavior and Theory

Bio

Elizabeth Campbell is a Ph.D. Candidate in Organizational Behavior and Theory in the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University. Campbell studies factors that contribute to gender differences in organizations and careers using experimental and field-based research methods.

Education

  • Carnegie Mellon University – MS (Organizational Behavior and Theory) - 2017
  • Wellesley College – BA (Psychology) - 2013

Research

Gender, career advancement, promotion and hiring, sponsorship

Publications

Research in Progress

  • Campbell, E. L., & Hahl, O. He’s overqualified, she’s highly committed: The effect of job candidate gender and capability on perceptions of firm and career commitment. Revise and Resubmit at Academy of Management Journal.
  • Chow, R., & Campbell, E. Using a social capital perspective to understand gender differences in the effectiveness of sponsors: A theoretical framework. In preparation for submission.
  • A problem with sponsorship: Evidence of gender differences in the effectiveness of male and female sponsors. Working paper with Rosalind Chow and Brandy Aven.
  • The effect of goals on the cognitive network activation of male and female sponsors. Working paper with Catherine Shea.
  • Gender composition and team performance in time-sensitive situations: Evidence from escape room teams. Working paper with Anita Woolley.

Teaching

Instructor (Undergraduate) – Negotiations and Conflict Management

Teaching Assistant (MBA) – Corporate Strategy, Global and Distributed Teams, Managing People and Teams, Managing Networks and Organizations, Negotiations, Organizational Change

Awards

  • Carnegie Mellon University Paul S. Goodman Doctoral Dissertation Award, 2019
  • Carnegie Mellon University Henry J. Gailliot Presidential Fellowship, 2018
  • Center for Behavior and Decision Research Small Grant, 2016