Ted Selker to be Honored at the Outstanding Achievement and Advocacy Awards (OAA)-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Ted Selker to be Honored at the Outstanding Achievement and Advocacy Awards (OAA)-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Ted Selker to be Honored at the Outstanding Achievement and Advocacy Awards (OAA)

Dr. Ted Selker, Associate Director of the CyLab Mobility Research Center, will be honored at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Outstanding Achievement and Advocacy Awards Banquet on May 4, 2012. As part of the ceremony, Dr. Selker will participate in a roundtable discussion with graduate students, a panel discussion with other honorees and the awards banquet.

Dr. Selker is being honored for outstanding vision and creativity in invention and product development based on cognitive science that simplify and enrich human experience in complex domains.

From 1998 to 2008, Dr. Selker was an Associate Professor at the MIT Media Laboratory where he created the Context Aware Computing Group, co-directed the Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project, and directed the Counter Design Intelligence: Product Design of the Future project. Prior to joining the MIT faculty, he directed the User Systems Ergonomics Research Laboratory at IBM Research, where he became an IBM Fellow in 1996. He has served as a consulting professor at Stanford University, taught at Hampshire College, the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Brown University.

Dr. Selker is noted for research that has contributed to products ranging from notebook computers to operating systems. Among many computer innovations, he is known for inventing the TrackPoint pointing device and for designing the Thinkpad 755CV notebook computer, which doubles as an LCD projector.

Dr. Selker received a B.S. in Applied Mathematics from Brown University in 1979, an M.S. in Computer Science from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 1981, and a Ph.D. from the City University of New York in Artificial Intelligence and Education in 1992. His work has resulted in 56 patents, many awards, and many papers. Dr. Selker’s inventions have received more than 30 industry awards. He was co-recipient of the “Computer Science Policy Leader Award for the Scientific American 50” in 2004 and the American Association for People with Disabilities "Thomas Paine Award” for his work on voting technology in 2006.

We congratulate Ted on his well-deserved recognition!