Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley Celebrates New Building with Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley Celebrates New Building with Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley Celebrates New Building with Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony

Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley celebrated the opening of a new wing with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Wednesday, January 12, 2011. The new wing of the campus will be located in Building 19, in the 1050-60 section of NASA Ames Research Park at Moffett Field. The wing consists of 11 rooms, which have been renovated to accommodate two conference rooms, one office space, three work areas for 30 graduate students, two work areas for 16 researchers, two offices for Institute Telecom, a partner of Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, and one student/faculty lounge.

The project was the final phase of a three-phase renovation plan that began in 2008 with the transformation of Building 23, the main building for the Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley campus. During Phase I, a high-tech, point-to-point video conferencing classroom was created to accommodate distance-learning, and student work stations were put in place to house the new full-time student masters and PhD students. In Phase II, renovations focused on improving audio-quality for remote-classroom capability, and maximization of meeting and office spaces.

As the full-time programs continued to grow in 2010, leadership at CMU saw a need to expand the campus beyond the walls of building 23. An opportunity arose at NASA Ames Research Park, where Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley is located, to occupy a wing of building 19, directly across the parade grounds in the center of the campus. Carnegie Mellon will share its building with University of California, Santa Cruz, and several start-up companies associated with NASA.

“We’ve seen tremendous growth in our academic and research areas. I’m pleased we can provide new accommodations for our graduate students and researchers. The CMU building project team has provided a seamless integration to the new wing,” said Dr. Martin Griss, director of the Silicon Valley campus and associate dean at the College of Engineering. Griss continued, joking, “It feels like every time we finish construction on a new phase, we immediately outgrow it! This is an exciting time to be at the Silicon Valley campus.”