Campus Receives Motorola Xoom Tablets and Devour Phones-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Campus Receives Motorola Xoom Tablets and Devour Phones-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Campus Receives Motorola Xoom Tablets and Devour Phones

Professors Martin Griss, Joy Zhang and Collin Jackson are the recipients of three Motorola Xoom tablets for their research at Carnegie Mellon University’s Silicon Valley campus. Professor Ted Selker is the recipient of ten Motorola Devour phones for his Android Development course.

Professors Martin Griss and Joy Zhang’s research efforts involve investigating topics related to socializing the TV viewing experience and making the interaction more context-aware. This will entail learning a user’s preference and real-time updating a personality profile encompassing identity, history, location, mood, intent, speech, activities and social graph amongst other factors. The profiles would then allow for intelligent communications to offer a socialized guide to media using Xoom tablets.

Professor Collin Jackson’s research efforts include translating apps from iPad and iPhone to Android and other platforms. Porting apps between platforms presents a tremendous burden for developers. Professor Jackson has developed an alternative approach called "Apportable" for translating apps. The application runs inside a simulated iOS environment on the target device, and can achieve high performance by executing native instructions on the processor. Several top iPhone and iPad game developers are using this technique to port their apps to the Motorola Xoom -- without needing to change their application source code.

In addition, Professor Ted Selker will be using the Devour phones in his Android Development course. In six short weeks, students in Dr. Selker's class will develop mobile applications, pitch poster sessions and create YouTube videos of their novel app ideas. Last year’s students submitted their posters in conference and one student won the top mobile application award at MobiCASE 2010. Judges were Google, Microsoft, Motorola and Nokia. Other students have used their apps to launch new start-up companies.

Professor Martin Griss said, "This donation will add to our collaboration with Motorola, who provided a $50,000 grant last year to fund context-aware computing research and several Motoblur phones. We look forward to extending our collaboration to bring to new, novel smart TVs and additional mobile applications."