Faculty Presents at Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Faculty Presents at Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Faculty Presents at Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education

The Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE) Technical Symposium addresses problems common among educators working to develop, implement and/or evaluate computing programs, curricula, and courses. The symposium provides a forum for sharing new ideas for syllabi, laboratories, and other elements of teaching and pedagogy, at all levels of instruction. SIGCSE 2010, the 41st ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, held March 10-13 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, continues the long tradition of bringing together colleagues from around the world.  The educators make contact via paper, panel, poster and special sessions, as well as workshops that allow them to renew and make new connections as they discuss the challenges and excitement of computer science education. This major conference on computer science education typically attracts around 3500 attendees and accepts approximately 30% of submitted papers.

Ray Bareiss presented the paper Coaching via Cognitive Apprenticeship, which was co-written by Martin Radley. At Carnegie Mellon’s Silicon Valley campus, the faculty employ a learn-by-doing educational approach in which nearly all student learning, and thus instruction, is in the context of realistic, team-based projects. Consequently, the program has adopted coaching as the predominant teaching model.

Bareiss summarizes, “in this paper we reflect on our experience with the nature of teaching by coaching using a framework derived from Cognitive Apprenticeship, and explain how we employ the techniques it suggests in our teaching. We also discuss a range of instructional tensions that arise in teaching by coaching and present a survey of student attitudes regarding the effectiveness of our approach.”