Silicon Valley Faculty Chairs Web 2.0 Security & Privacy Workshop-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Silicon Valley Faculty Chairs Web 2.0 Security & Privacy Workshop-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Silicon Valley Faculty Chairs Web 2.0 Security & Privacy Workshop

Collin Jackson
Collin Jackson

Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley Professor Collin Jackson was program chair of the fourth annual “W2SP 2010: Web 2.0 Security and Privacy 2010” workshop, held in conjunction with the 2010 IEEE Security & Privacy Symposium.

The one day workshop, held on May 20, brought together researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to focus on understanding Web 2.0 security and privacy issues and to establish new collaborations in these areas.

Two insightful speakers set the tone for the workshop. The keynote speaker was Jeremiah Grossman, CTO and founder of WhiteHat Security. Over lunch, invited speaker Kurt Opsahl, senior staff attorney at Electronic Frontier Foundation, spoke about social network privacy touching upon Facebook's privacy settings and user privacy rights.

During the workshop's five sessions, twelve papers were presented on subjects ranging from privacy and security to mobile web and browser APIs. At the Measuring Security session, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley student Mustafa Acer presented the paper, “Critical Vulnerability in Browser Security Metrics". Acer offered, "As a master's student, the opportunity to present in this conference was truly exciting for me. There was a fair amount of attention on our research and we received valuable feedback. Our research focused on browser security metrics where we propose a new metric called "risk score" to better evaluate browsers. We had a chance to alarm the community about the harms some of the most widely used metrics in the industry do."

W2SP logo

Sponsors of the workshop included Google, Mozilla, IBM, Microsoft Research, Intel, Qualcomm and TRUST.

The W2SP workshop was held after the IEEE Symposium, where Carnegie Mellon had a prominent representation, including session chairs and papers at 6 of the 10 sessions.