Multi-Agent Networked Systems with Adversarial Elements-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Multi-Agent Networked Systems with Adversarial Elements-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Multi-Agent Networked Systems with Adversarial Elements

CMU-SV welcomes Tamer Başar 

Director of the Center for Advanced Study, Swanlund Endowed Chair & CAS Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

Date/Time: Wednesday, March 11, 1:30 pm (PDT) / 4:30 pm (EDT)

Location

CMU Silicon Valley Campus: Bldg 23, Rm 118 [directions]
Pittsburgh campus: Hamerschlag Hall 1107

Video

Multi-Agent Networked Systems with Adversarial Elements

The recent emergence of multi-agent networks in general, and cyber-physical systems in particular, has brought about several non-traditional and non-standard requirements on strategic decision-making, thus challenging the governing assumptions of traditional control and game theory. Some of these requirements stem from factors such as: (i) limitations on memory, (ii) limitations on computation and communication capabilities, (iii) heterogeneity of decision makers (machines versus humans), (iv) heterogeneity and sporadic failure of channels that connect the information sources (sensors) to decision units (strategic agents), (v) limitations on the frequency of exchanges between different decision units and the actions taken by the agents, (vi) operation being conducted in a hostile environment where disturbances are controlled by adversarial agents, (vii) lack of cooperation among multiple decision units, (viii) lack of a common objective shared by multiple control stations, and (ix) presence of multiple layers in the topologies of the underlying networks. These all lead to substantial degradation in performance and loss in efficiency if appropriate mechanisms are not in place. The talk will identify the underlying challenges, particularly those that are brought about by the adversarial nature of the environment, and also dwell on the research opportunities this broader framework creates for communication, control and game theory. In this context, issues of network resilience, reliability and security will be discussed, with some specific applications in networks with static and dynamic (mobile) nodes, with adversary-inflicted topological changes.

Speaker Bio:

Tamer Başar has been with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign since 1981, where he holds the academic positions of Swanlund Endowed Chair; Center for Advanced Study Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Professor, Coordinated Science Laboratory; Professor, Information Trust Institute; and Affiliate Professor, Mechanical Sciences and Engineering. He is also the Director of the Center for Advanced Study. He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering and the European Academy of Sciences; Fellow of IEEE, IFAC, and SIAM; a past president of the IEEE Control Systems Society (CSS), the founding president of the International Society of Dynamic Games (ISDG), and a past president of the American Automatic Control Council (AACC). He has received several awards and recognitions over the years, including the highest awards of IEEE CSS, IFAC, AACC, and ISDG, the IEEE Control Systems Technical Field Award, and a number of international honorary doctorates and professorships. Dr. Başar has over 650 publications in systems, control, communications, optimization, and dynamic games, including books on non-cooperative dynamic game theory, robust control, network security, wireless and communication networks, and stochastic networks. He is editor of several book series.