Mellon College of Science-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University

To find a recent news and videos from the Mellon College of Science, scroll below. For more, check out the MCS news website. Questions? Contact Jocelyn Duffy, director of public relations, at jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu or (412) 268-9982.

Mellon College of Science

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Intermediary Neuron Acts as Synaptic Cloaking Device, Says Carnegie Mellon Study

Star Trek NeuronIn the study published in the March 16 issue of Current Biology, the researchers found that a class of inhibitory neurons, called somatostatin cells, send out a signal — much like a cloaking device — that silences neighboring excitatory neurons. MORE
Monday, February 23, 2015

Three Carnegie Mellon Professors Win Sloan Research Fellowships

Boris BukhRaphael FlauglerAriel ProcacciaMathematician Boris Bukh, physicist Raphael Flauger and computer scientist Ariel Procaccia are among 126 early-career scientists and scholars from 57 colleges and universities in the United States and Canada who will receive $50,000 to further their research. MORE
Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Carnegie Mellon Faculty, Student Win Carnegie Science Center Awards

Carnegie Science Center LogoFive faculty members and one doctoral student will be recognized for their outstanding science and technology achievements on May 8. MORE
Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Carnegie Mellon Mathematical Sciences Student Tomer Reiter Wins Gates Cambridge Scholarship

Tomer ReiterReiter, only the second CMU student to receive the Gates Cambridge Scholarship, plans to study number theory at the University of Cambridge. MORE
Thursday, February 5, 2015

"Maker Movement" Pioneer Joseph DeSimone Wins Carnegie Mellon's Dickson Prize in Science

Joseph DeSimoneDeSimone, a chemist and chemical engineer, has developed two techniques for the rapid prototyping of vehicles for drug delivery. He'll receive the award and give a lecture at 4:30 p.m., Monday, Feb. 16.
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Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Deflategate: Could Physics Be at Fault?

FootballCarnegie Mellon Physics Professor Gregg Franklin explains how physics could have played a role in football's latest controversy. MORE