Carnegie Mellon University
Skip navigation and jump directly to page content

Dec. 8: Carnegie Mellon's Nadine Aubry Elected Associate Fellow Of American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

Contact: Chriss Swaney / 412-268-5776 / swaney@andrew.cmu.edu

Carnegie Mellon's Nadine Aubry Elected Associate Fellow
Of American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

Outstanding Research Supports Nomination to Prestigious Aerospace Association


Nadine AubryPITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University's Nadine Aubry has been awarded the distinction of associate fellow in the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) for her outstanding work in the field of fluid dynamics and as a leader in mechanical engineering education.

"I am extremely honored by this distinction, and I plan to build on the innovative environment that comes with such recognition," said Aubry, the Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor and head of Carnegie Mellon's Mechanical Engineering Department. "As the aerospace sector continues to grow and evolve, it is imperative that we continue addressing the technical challenges that aviation and space technology face today, as well as providing state-of-the-art education to train tomorrow's aerospace leaders."

This year, Aubry joins the ranks of 186 selected among more than 35,000 AIAA members worldwide who will be inducted as AIAA associate fellows at the 49th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Jan. 4 in Orlando.

According to the AIAA, associate fellows must have accomplished or been in charge of important engineering or scientific work, or have done work of outstanding merit or have otherwise made outstanding contributions to the arts, sciences, or technology of aeronautics or astronautics. 

"Nadine is an excellent role model and researcher, and this latest award recognizes her for both her technical and leadership skills," said Pradeep K. Khosla, the Dowd University Professor and dean of Carnegie Mellon's top-ranked College of Engineering.

In addition to her pioneering work on reduced models of turbulence, Aubry also made noteworthy contributions to the field of microfluids, which, due to the reduced load of such small devices, plays a crucial role in the advancement of both large, more capable aerospace vehicles and miniature ones, too. 

Aubry's interdisciplinary research and close ties to industry have helped her garner other important awards, including the National Science Foundation's Presidential Young Investigator Award. She also was chair of the U.S. National Committee on Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, a National Research Council committee that represents the U.S. internationally in scientific matters related to the field of mechanics. It also serves as a national forum for defining issues in mechanics research, technology and education.

Aubry earned a bachelor's degree in 1984 from the National Polytechnic Institute of Grenoble, France, and a master's degree from the Scientific and Medical University, also in Grenoble. In 1987, she received her Ph.D. from Cornell University.

###

Pictured above is Nadine Aubry, the Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor and head of Carnegie Mellon's Mechanical Engineering Department.