Carnegie Mellon University

Grand Strategy in the United States

Course Number: 84-380

This course introduces students to the concept of grand strategy in the United States, broadly defined as the combination of diplomatic, economic, military, and political factors used by American presidents and their administrations to advance U.S. interests throughout the world.  In the context of highly interdependent domestic and international politics, leaders must develop strategies that address a diverse range of internal, state, and non-state challenges while also dealing with the myriad challenges resulting from globalization, or the intersection of international politics, culture, markets, and technology.  This course will review American diplomatic history over the ages, with a focus on both Cold War and post- Cold War American presidencies and their respective approaches to defending American national security whilst also playing a role as one of the world's leading powers. The course will conclude with an assessment of American grand strategy over the course of the past decade and how the United States manages relations with rising powers like China, revanchist states like Russia, and host of near-peer and other adversaries, including Iran and North Korea.

Academic Year: 2019-2020
Semester(s): Fall
Required/Elective: Elective
Units: 9
Location(s): Pittsburgh

Learning Objectives

This course is critical to the International Relations and Politics major and understanding international relations and global politics more broadly, as well as how the United States fits into the broader picture.  Students will learn how the U.S. rose to primacy following World War II, how the United States staked its claim to be the leader of the free world during the Cold War, and how the U.S. was impacted by 9/11 and the Global War on Terrorism, as well as what U.S. Grand Strategy looks like today and what it may look like in the future.

Fall 2019
Monday and Wednesday
12:00- 1:20 PM

Elective course for the following IPS degrees:
B.S. International Relations and Politics
Additional Major in International Relations and Politics
B.S. Economics and Politics
Additional Major in Economics and Politics
Minor in International Relations and Politics
Minor in Cybersecurity and International Conflict