People-Engineering Research Accelerator - Carnegie Mellon University

NEEP People

Administration | Faculty | NEEP Trainees | Affiliates

Administration

  • Faculty Principal Investigator: Jeanne VanBriesen, Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE); Director, Center for Water Quality in Urban Environmental Systems (Water QUEST); Carnegie Mellon University (CMU).
    Modeling microbial transformations of recalcitrant compounds

Faculty Coordinators

International Experiences:

  • Gregory Lowry, Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE); Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Deputy Director, Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEINT).
    Fate, transport,and transformations of nanoparticles in the environment

Corporate Internships:

  • Kelvin Gregory, Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE); Carnegie Mellon University (CMU).
    Biological processes and nanoeffects on microbes
  • Gary Harris, Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director, Howard Nanoscale Science and Engineering Facility; Howard University
    Biological processes and nanoeffects on microbes

Diversity:

  • Jeanne VanBriesen, Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE); Director, Center for Water Quality in Urban Environmental Systems (Water QUEST); Carnegie Mellon University (CMU).
    Modeling microbial transformations of recalcitrant compounds
  • Lorraine Fleming, Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Howard University
    Engineering education and assessment

Education:

  • Kris Dahl, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering (CHE) and Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME), Carnegie Mellon University (CMU).
    Biocharacterization of nanomaterials with mammalian cells and ethics of nanomaterial technologies
  • Kimberly Jones, Associate Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Howard University.
    Fate and transport of nanoparticles in the environment and characterization of nano-scale materials

NEEP-IGERT Faculty

  • Michael Bockstaller, Assistant Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), Carnegie Mellon University (CMU).
    Synthesis, structure and properties of nanomaterials/NPs and nanomaterial containing media
  • Elizabeth Casman, Associate Research Professor, Department of Engineering and Public Policy (EPP), Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). Leader, risk analysis group in the NSF/EPA Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEINT).
    Risk analysis and risk communication for pathogens and toxicants
  • David Dzombak, Walter J. Blenko, Sr. University Professor and Department Head, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University.
  • Paul Fischbeck, Professor, Department of Social and Decision Science (SDS) and Engineering and Public Policy (EPP); Director, Center for the Study and Improvement of Regulation; Carnegie Mellon University (CMU).
    Decision support
  • Gary Harris, Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Director, Howard Nanoscale Science and Engineering Facility; Howard University.
    Biological processes and nanoeffects on microbes
  • Mohammad Islam, Assistant Professor, Chemical Engineering (CHE) and Material Science Engineering (MSE), Carnegie Mellon University (CMU).
    Carbon nanotubes, condensed matter physics, and cell biology
  • Meagan Mauter, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University.
  • James W. Mitchell, David and Lucile Packard Materials Science Research Center of Excellence (MSRCE) Professor, Chemical Engineering, Howard.
    Synthesis and characterization of ultra pure nanoparticles and their reaction chemistry in fluid media

2014-2015 NEEP Trainees

Stefanie Baker Stefanie Baker is a first year Ph.D. student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. She grew up in Milton-Freewater, OR and graduated from Oregon State University with a B.S. in Chemical Engineering in June 2014. Her interests are in the biomedical applications of nanotechnology. She is currently investigating the toxicity and interactions between carbon nanotubes and cells. (Advisors: Kris Dahl and Mohammad Islam)
Steve Klara
Steve Klara is currently a 3rd year PhD student in the department of Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. Steve grew up in Bethel Park, a suburb of Pittsburgh, PA. He graduated from Penn State in 2012 with a B.S in Chemical Engineering and a minor in German. Steven’s research focuses around determining how the chemistry and nanostructure of membrane surfaces affect membrane fouling, with a goal of lowering membrane maintenance costs for water separation plants. Steve was recently awarded with an NSF Graduate Fellowship Honorable Mention for this work. Advisor: Meagan Mauter.
Eleanor Spielman-Sun
Eleanor Spielman-Sun: Eleanor is currently a first year PhD student in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon. She is originally from Menlo Park, California, and completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Oberlin College in May 2014. Eleanor’s research focus is in the field of water quality. (Advisor: Greg Lowry)

2013-2014 NEEP Trainees

Adam Cadwallader, Adam is currently a first year PhD student in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He is originally from Auburn, New York and completed his undergraduate degree in Environmental Engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in May 2013. Adam’s research focus will be within the field of water quality. (Advisor: Jeanne VanBriesen)


Kelly Donmoyer Good, Kelly is a first year graduate student in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. She grew up in Lancaster, PA and graduated from Villanova University with a B.S. in Civil Engineering in 2009. From 2009 to 2013 she worked for American Water as a staff engineer. She is part of Dr. VanBriesen's research group investigating nanotechnology and water quality. (Advisor: Jeanne VanBriesen)


Eric McGivney, Eric is a first year PhD student in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He received a B.S. in Environmental Engineering Biotechnology from the University of Delaware in 2011 and an M.Sc. in Environmental Engineering from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. Eric's previous research focused on using Advanced Oxidation Technologies to treat ballast water. He also assisted in a research project at EPFL in Switzerland involving Uranium speciation in the environment. Eric is currently researching the effects of nanoparticles on cell-to-cell signaling. (Advisors: Kelvin Gregory, Jeanne VanBriesen)


Mariama Orange, Mariama is a PhD student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Howard University. She also holds both her Bachelor and Masters degrees, from Howard University, in Electrical Engineering. Mariama is thrilled to begin research as an IGERT trainee, studying nanoparticles and biofilms in order to model their interaction and help us better understand how nanoparticles affect our environment. (Advisors: Everette Joseph, Kimberly Jones)


Evan Wilson, Evan is a second year graduate student in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics from the University of Wisconsin – Platteville in May 2012. As an undergraduate, he worked with spectroscopy and photophysics of nanoparticles. His current research is on improving electrochemical energy storage and generation through the design of interpenetrating nanostructured electrodes using carbon nanotubes. (Advisor: Mohammad Islam)

2012-2013 NEEP Trainees


Lauren Strahs, Lauren is a graduate student in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon. She graduated from the University of Michigan in April 2012 with a BSE in Civil Engineering. Lauren participated in drinking water research in an environmental biotechnology lab as an undergraduate student. She is now working in Professor Jeanne VanBriesen’s group researching nanotechnology applications in drinking water treatment. (Advisors: Jeanne VanBriesen, Kimberly Jones)

2011-2012 NEEP Trainees


Amy Dale, Amy is a graduate student in the Engineering and Public Policy (EPP) and Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) departments at Carnegie Mellon University. She graduated from the University of Pittsburgh in 2011 with a B.S.in Bioinformatics. She was awarded a national Udall scholarship in 2010 in recognition of her passion for environmental change through policy and research. Amy creates mathematical models to describe the transport and chemical transformations of nanomaterials released to the environment during manufacturing, use, or disposal, in order to better understand the emerging environmental risks of nanotechnology. (Advisors: Elizabeth Casman, Gregory Lowry)


Rachel Ferebee, Rachel is a graduate student in the Material Science and Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University. She earned her BS in Materials Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY in May 2011. In 2010 she received the ASM George A. Roberts Scholarship and the TMS Electronic, Magnetic, and Photonic Materials Division Gilbert Chin Scholarship for her research and outreach contributions to the materials engineering community. Rachel is researching block copolymer / nanoparticle composites for bioactive sensing applications in Dr. Bockstaller's research group. (Advisors: Michael Bockstaller, Gregory Lowry)


Clare Mahoney, Clare Mahoney is a graduate student in Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. She completed her undergraduate degree at University of Illinois Urbana Champaign in Materials Science and Engineering with a minor in Chemistry in May 2011. Clare previously worked on texture of out of equilibrium metals for two and a half years at the University of Illinois. Clare is working with Professor Bockstaller on understanding the effect of particle addition on optical and thermal properties of polymer nano composites. (Advisor: Michael Bockstaller, Gregory Lowry)


John Stegemeier, John is a graduate student in the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at Carnegie Mellon University. He completed his undergraduate education in Chemistry from Chapman University in Orange, California. He received the 2009 ACS undergraduate award from the Environmental Chemistry division for his work concerning the uptake and retention of heavy metals onto iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles. His main research focus at CMU involves the fate and transport of nanomaterials in environmental systems. (Advisor: Gregory Lowry, Jeanne VanBriesen)

Affiliates - updated 8-2014

  • Patrick Boyer (CMU)
  • Shauna-Gaye Campbell (HU)
  • Bundhit Chucherdwatanasak (CMU)
  • Kaiqi Fang (CMU)
  • Daniel Gingerich (CMU)
  • Brian Holt (CMU)
  • Efosa Igbinigun (HU)
  • Rui Ma (CMU)
  • Mandy Mitchell (HU)
  • Joe Moore II (CMU)
  • Sarah Robb (CMU)
  • Sara Schwetschenau (CMU)