Carnegie Mellon University

Aleecia McDonald

Aleecia McDonald

Professor, Courtesy Appointment, Engineering and Public Policy

Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

I work for the Silicon Valley campus of Carnegie Mellon in the Information Networking Institute, which is part of the engineering college. My primary responsibilities are around the practicum offerings, where we pair student teams with external clients.

  • Carnegie Mellon, Assistant Professor of the Practice, Information Networking Institute; Courtesy Appointment, Engineering and Public Policy 7/18 – Present
  • Stanford University Center for Internet & Society, Director of Privacy, staff position, 12/12 – 12/14
  • Stanford University Center for Internet & Society, Resident Fellow, half-time staff position, 11/11 – 11/12
  • Mozilla Corporation, Senior Privacy Researcher, contract and part-time employment, 3/11 – 11/12
  • Carnegie Mellon University, Research Assistant, staff position, 5/06 – 8/06
  • Center for Democracy & Technology, Summer Intern, 5/05 – 7/05

Education

Carnegie Mellon University Engineering & Public Policy Ph.D., September, 2010. Thesis: Footprints Near the Surf: Individual Privacy Decisions in Online Contexts. Committee members: Lorrie Faith Cranor (chair), Alessandro Acquisti, Deirdre K. Mulligan, Jon M. Peha.

Carnegie Mellon University H. John Heinz School of Public Policy and Management. M.S. in Public Policy and Management with a concentration in Internet Policy, May, 2006.

Carnegie Mellon University B.A., Professional Writing, 1993.

Research

I work for the Silicon Valley campus of Carnegie Mellon in the Information Networking Institute, which is part of the engineering college. My primary responsibilities are around the practicum offerings, where we pair student teams with external clients.

I research topics in Internet privacy and security. I work to contribute to a more coherent picture of how, why, and when people make choices about protecting themselves online, and what that means to them. My interests span users' mental models of online interaction, study of and creation of usable tools to support online decision making, and how people learn about and reason about online trust issues. In addition to technical tools, I focus on technically informed policy approaches in standards bodies, regulatory agencies, and legislation in the United States and European Union nations.

Publications

Book Chapters

  • McDonald, A. M. Stakeholders and High Stakes: Divergent Standards for Do Not Track. In: Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Privacy, Polonetsky, J., Selinger, E., and Tien, O. (eds). Cambridge University Press.
  • McDonald, A. M. When Self-help Helps: User Adoption of Privacy Technologies. In Rotenberg, M., Horwitz J., and Scott J. (editors) Privacy in the Modern Age, The New Press (2015). [English (2015) | Chinese (2017)]

Journal Publications

Conference Proceedings

  1. Zuiderveen Borgesius, F. J., and McDonald, A. M. (2015). Do Not Track for Europe. 43rd Research Conference on Communication, Information and Internet Policy (Telecommunications Policy Research Conference) September 26, 2015.
  2. Reidenberg, Joel R., Breaux, T., Cranor, L. F., French, B., Grannis, A., Graves, J. T., Liu, F., McDonald, A. M., Norton, T. B., Ramanath, R., Russell, N. C., Sadeh, N. and Schaub, F., Disagreeable Privacy Policies: Mismatches between Meaning and Users Understanding (August 15, 2014). Fordham Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2418297; 42nd Research Conference on Communication, Information and Internet Policy (Telecommunications Policy Research Conference) September, 2014.
  3. Sadeh, N., Acquisti, A., Breaux, T. D., Cranor, L. F., McDonald, A. M., Reidenberg, J., Smith, N. A., Liu, F., Russell, N. Cameron, Schaub, F., Wilson, S., Graves, J. T., Leon, P. G., Ramanath, R., and Rao, A. (2014). Towards Usable Privacy Policies: Semi-automatically Extracting Data Practices From Websites' Privacy Policies. SOUPS (July 9-11, 2014).
  4. McDonald, A. M. User Perceptions of Online Advertising. Yale ISP Conference (March 25-26, 2011).
  5. McDonald, A. M., and Peha, J. M. Track Gap: Policy Implications of User Expectations for the 'Do Not Track' Internet Privacy Feature39th Research Conference on Communication, Information and Internet Policy (Telecommunications Policy Research Conference) September 25, 2011.
  6. McDonald, A. M, and Cranor, L. F. Beliefs and Behaviors: Internet Users’ Understanding of Behavioral Advertising38th Research Conference on Communication, Information and Internet Policy(Telecommunications Policy Research Conference) October 2, 2010.
  7. McDonald, A. M. Cookie Confusion: Do Browser Interfaces Undermine Understanding? In Proceedings of the 28th International Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (2010). CHI EA '10. [Author's version]