Carnegie Mellon University

Chante Cox-Boyd

Chante Cox-Boyd

Assoc. Teaching Professor, Psychology

  • 343 Baker Hall
  • 412-268-2801

Bio

My primary research interests lie in the area of Social Cognition. I have always been fascinated by the manner in which individuals make social judgments of others, often based on a minimum amount of information. Early in my career I worked on a project entitled: “Categorical Race Versus Individuating Beliefs as Determinates of Discrimination”. This study involved a look at the false beliefs that individuals hold of those of other racial groups and the impact these beliefs have on their willingness to interact with out-group members. My work today still attempts to explore this issue. It is my goal to uncover the many sources of information that individuals use to make social judgments and the impact these judgments have on the relations between out-group members. I often conduct research in the area of Prejudice and Discrimination.

Most recently, I have conducted research in the area of name stereotypes. Just as group categories such as race, sex, and age have well-defined stereotypes or behaviors expected by the group members, my research indicated that names have stereotypes associated with them. In particular, my focus has been on names associated with minority groups. My research indicates ethnic sounding names are often used as a basis of discrimination and can even signal social class.

A second area of stereotype research I have explored is stereotypes associated with Caucasian Americans. Although Caucasian stereotypes are widely held and shared by minority group member, Caucasians are often unaware of these stereotypes. I seek to determine both the content of the Caucasian stereotypes and the impact it may have on group members.

A final related area of interest I hold pertains to the impact of Social Stigmas and the role of self-fulfilling prophecies in determining individual achievement and emotional health.

Publications

Insko, C. A., Schopler, J., Drigotas, S. M., Graetz, K. A., Kennedy, J., Cox, C. L., & Bornstein, G. (1993). The role of communication in inter individual intergroup discontinuity. Journal of Conflict Resolution, 37 (1), 108-138.

Schopler, J. ,Insko, C. A. , Drigotas, S., Weiselquist, J., Pemberton, M., & Cox, C. L. (1995). The role of identifiability in the reduction of interindividual intergroup discontinuity. Journal of Experimental and Social Psychology, 31, 553-574.

Cox, C. L., Smith, S. L., & Insko, C. A. (1996). Categorical race versus individuating belief as determinants of discrimination: A study of Southern adolescents in 1966, 1979, and 1993. Journal of Experimental and Social Psychology, 32, 39-70.

Council, F. M., Stewart, J. R., & Cox. C. L. (1997). A new method for predicting crashworthiness. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 29, (1), 109-123.

Cox, C. L., Wexler, M., Rusbult, C. E., & Gaines, S. O. (1997). Prescriptive support and commitment processes in close relationships. Social Psychology Quarterly, 60 (1), 79-90.

Gaines, S. O. Jr., Reis, H. T., Summers, S., Rusbult, C. E., Cox. C. L., & Wexler, M. O. (1997). The impact of attachment styles on reactions to accommodative dilemmas in close relationships. Personal Relationships, 4, 93-113.

Gaines, S. O., Panter, A. T., Lyde, M. C., Steers, W. N., Rusbult, C.E., Cox, C. L., & Wexler, M. O. (1997). Evaluating the circumplexity of interpersonal traits and the manifestation of interpersonal traits in interpersonal trust. (In press). Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

Martz, J. M., Verette, J., Arriaga, X. A., Slovik, L. F., Cox, C. L., & Rusbult, C. E. (1997). Positive illusion in close relationships. Personal Relationships.

Van Lange, P. A. M., Rusbult, C. E., Drigotas, S. M., Arriaga, X. B., Witcher, B. B. & Cox, C. L. (1997). Willingness to sacrifice in close relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 72 (2), 1373 1395.

Rusbult, C. E., Arriaga, X. B., Bissonnette, V. I., & Cox, C. L. (1998). Accommodation processes across the early years of marriage. In. T. N. Bradbury (Ed.). The developmental course of marital dysfunction. New York: Cambridge.

Presentaions


Cox, C. L. & Kenne, D. (1998). Alcohol use and conflict resolution in Marriage: A Comparison of drinkers and non drinkers. Poster presented at the Successful Relating Conference March 18 21, 1998: Tucson, Arizona.

Cox, C. L. & Kenne, D. (1998). Alcohol use and responses to dissatisfaction in marriage. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association. March 26 29, 1998: Mobile, AL.

Cox, C. L. (1998). Stereotyping as a tool to teach diversity. Faculty Development Workshop conducted at Indiana University Purdue University School of Nursing. November 30, 1998: Indianapolis, IN.

Cox, C. L (1998). Teacher expectations and self fulfilling prophecies. Faculty Training Workshop presented for University College at Indiana University. November 30, 1998, Indianapolis, IN.

Boyd, C.C. & Chang. (2007) Cultural differences in parenting styles: Effects on teen satisfaction. Presented at the 19th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological, May 24-27, Washington , DC.

Boyd, C.C. (2009) The introduction of stereotypes into the classroom by the use of stereotypes: What's in a name? Presented at the 19th Annual Meeting of the National Institute on the Teaching of Psychology January 2-5, Tampa, FL.

Boyd, C. C. (2010). The Social Nature of gender. Presented at the MOSIAC Conference. February 28, Carnegie Mellon University

Boyd, C. C. (2010). Engaging students in research through the use of personal examples: Making research relevant. Presented at the 13th National Conference of the Council for Undergraduate Research, June 19-24, Ogden UT.

Boyd, C.C. (2011) Tips on integrating diversity into class activities: Lessons from social psychology. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting for the Eastern Conference on the Teaching of Psychology. June 23-23, Staunton, VA.

Boyd, C.C. (2011). A few of our favorite activities and demonstrations for teaching psychology. Workshop participant at the Eastern Conference for the Teaching of Psychology.