Carnegie Mellon University

2019 Spring Semester

Below is the list of Undergraduate courses offered by the History Department for Spring 2019. Extensive course listings can also be found on the Undergraduate Catalog.

Complete Course Descriptions as a PDF »


Instructor Units Lecture 1: MW 12:30-1:20
R. Law 9 Recitations on Fridays

By the end of the 20th century, the spread of democracy seemed all but inevitable as most nations in the world had established a version of it as their governing system. Even many of those that had not still adopted trappings of democracy such as popular elections, representative assemblies, constitutions, and terms of office. Yet the history of collective governance has shown repeatedly that its progress is not unstoppable or its continuation irreversible, and that democracies rose and fell just like other systems of government.

Nevertheless, the ideals of democracy remain a powerful inspiration today. How did democracy become such a widespread phenomenon? What are its features, strengths, and weaknesses? What factors determined whether a democracy would thrive or collapse? This Global History course will answer these questions by surveying the origins and developments of democratic systems in Ancient Rome, Revolutionary France, Weimar Germany, Taisho Japan, and others. By the end of the course, students will come to understand the importance of past lessons and the appeal and challenges of collective governance, and decide for themselves what role democracy should play in their lives.



Instructor Units Lecture 2, MW 1:30-2:20
R. Law 9 Recitations on Fridays

Today, halting genocide and curbing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction rank among the top priorities in international relations. This understanding of world affairs, however, did not always hold true. In fact, if anything, in the last few centuries various individuals and institutions channeled much effort into the invention and refinement of new ideological, organizational, and technological means for mass murder or waging war. How and why did modern societies become so competent in inflicting death and destruction on fellow humans? What has been and can be done to prevent similar occurrences from happening again?

This Global History course will answer these questions by analyzing the causes of and responses to past incidents resulting in mass deaths or tools for armed conflicts. Through lectures, discussion, primary sources, and assignments, the course will examine events within the European encounter with the Western Hemisphere, Imperialism in Africa, the Holocaust, the atomic bombings of Japan, the Cold War, and decolonization and independence. By the end of the course, students will come to realize the historical significance of unintended consequences and the ambiguity of human progress.



Instructor Units Lecture
A. Creasman 9 TR 3:00-4:20

This course introduces students to methods and materials that historians use to study the past. Its goals are: first, to familiarize students with ways that historians think about their research, how they carry it out, and how they debate findings with other historians; second, to train students in "best practices" for doing historical research in primary and secondary sources. We discuss how to ask questions about the past and develop a one-semester research topic, find appropriate primary and secondary sources, take notes from those sources, and write a paper that answers an original question using skills we have studied. In the Spring 2019 semester, we will use the topic of the history of witchcraft and witch-hunting to focus the class. Although Western beliefs in witchcraft and "devil worship" dated back to antiquity, the 16th and 17th centuries witnessed the "Great European Witch-Hunt," which cost the lives of thousands across Europe and in its American colonies. Ever since, historians have struggled to explain why fears of witchcraft suddenly became so acute in this period. And although the witch-hunts in early modern Europe and its colonies gradually came to an end, beliefs in witchcraft persist into the modern era and, in many parts of the world today, continue to generate campaigns of popular violence against alleged perpetrators. In this course, we'll examine both primary historical sources and secondary scholarship to explore competing interpretations of this complex historical puzzle. At the end of the term, students will submit a final 10-15 page research paper on a topic of their choice related to the themes of the course.



Instructor Units Lecture
E. Grama 9 MW 10:30-11:50

How do societies make meaning? Is culture a set of shared values or are these values continuously negotiated, altered, and adjusted? How do individuals and societies account for change and how do they aim to incorporate it into their values? This course introduces students to anthropological approaches to these questions. Readings will draw on case studies from very different settings: from a ruined city in Brazil to interethnic conflict in Cyprus, oil and chocolate in post-Soviet Russia, pyramid schemes in postsocialist Romania, and vampires stories in East and Central Africa. We will assess the advantages and pitfalls of comparing cross-cultural data, analyze the workings of power within and between societies, and consider the politics of cultural representations. We will also discuss the anthropologist's relationship to the people s/he studies, and the responsibilities inherent in that relationship. Throughout the course, students will learn the importance of a historical perspective on culture, looking at how and why societies change, and considering how we, as anthropologists, should assess these changes.



Instructor Units Lecture
A. Creasman 9 TR 10:30-11:50

This course examines European history from the Black Death to the French Revolution, a period known to history as the "early modern" period. That is, it marks a period in European history that was not quite medieval, and yet not quite modern. Many features of modern society, such as the nation-state, free-trade economies, religious pluralism, scientific rationalism, and secular culture trace their origins to the early modern era, yet the period was also marked by important continuities with the Middle Ages. During this course, we will explore how Europeans re-imagined their world in its transition from the medieval to the modern. Topics to be considered will include the "renaissance" of the arts, the problems of religious reform, exploration and colonialism, the rise of science, and the expansion of the state. Through these developments, we will focus on Europeans' changing notions of the human body, the body politic, and the natural world, as well as their re-interpretations of the proper relation between the human and the divine, the individual and the community, and the present and the past.



Instructor Units Lecture
E. Grama 9 MW 3:00-4:20

Organized as a combination of lectures and seminar discussions, this course explores the political, intellectual, social, and cultural changes occurring in 19th century and 20th century Central and Eastern Europe. It begins with an examination of the emergence of nationalist movements during the 19th century, to then explore the darker side of romantic nationalisms as they unfolded into the radical political ideologies such as socialism and fascism of the interwar period. We will ask to what extent these earlier histories continued to subtly influence post-1945 Central and Eastern Europe under socialism. The second part of the course will focus on the social and political transformations occurring at distinct moments in the history of the Soviet bloc: the 1950s Stalinization, the 1960s De-Stalinization, the emergence of the more subtle forms of dissent in the late 1970s and the early 1980s, and the revolutions of 1989. Course materials include not only historical and anthropological readings, but also historical documents, memoirs, and documentaries. The assignments include: mandatory attendance of lectures, regular participation in the class discussions, weekly diary entries and two take-home exams (midterm and final). The diary entries aim to make you better understand the mentalities and social and political changes at an individual level, by vicariously experience the events through "your" historical character. At the beginning of the semester, you will be assigned two specific characters that you will "impersonate" throughout the semester (one at the time), bringing in material from lectures and readings to bear on "your" character's own experiences.



Instructor Units Lecture
L. Z. Eisenberg 6 MW 1:30-2:50

How do historians determine how and why episodes in the past transpired? This course takes students behind the scenes and acquaints them with the techniques by which historians practice their craft in interpreting historical events. Using dramatic case studies in American history, we will examine a wide array of tools and sources at the historian's disposal, among them oral evidence, photographs and images, maps, official documents, memoirs, psycho-history, media and popular culture. Through in-class workshops and solo and group assignments, students will experiment with different methods of historical analysis using a variety of source material. Students will develop a familiarity with the historian's toolbox and a new-found appreciation for the painstaking efforts that go into producing the history books they may otherwise take for granted.



Instructor Units Lecture
H. Posner 6 MW 10:30-11:50

Railroads in the USA are often considered as a subject for nostalgia or public sector failure, an image largely based on passenger service. However, the USA's private sector freight rail industry is considered a model for the world as the result of its renaissance following deregulation in 1980. This is a "stealth" industry whose history and economics are both intertwined and complex. Starting with the development of the first U. S. railroads, students will gain a basic understanding of the industry's history and economics, with special attention to the past half-century. In addition, students will participate in small group research projects in particular areas of special interest -- for example, economic history, industry culture, network economics, utility regulation or transportation policy.



Instructor Units Lecture
B. Weiner 6 MW 12:00-1:20

Thirty years ago, on June 4, 1989, the world watched as tanks rolled into Beijing’s Tiananmen Square ending what had been six weeks of student-led protest calling for reform of the Chinese Communist Party and its policies. This was not the first time students had gathered at Tiananmen to demand political change. This year also marks the centennial anniversary of the student-led protests that launched the May 4th Movement, a social and intellectual revolution that fundamentally changed China and helped birth both the Nationalist Party of Chiang Kaishek and Communist Party of Mao Zedong. This class examines the causes and consequences of popular protest in twentieth-century China. While the focus is on the protests of 1919 and 1989, we will also look at other popular protests, including the Cultural Revolution (1966-1969), Democracy Wall Movement (1979), and post-Tiananmen protests among workers, farmers, ethnic minorities (especially Tibetans and Uyghurs), and others.



Instructor Units Lecture
S. Alfonso-Wells 9 TR 6:30-7:50PM

This course will examine the cultures and societies of the Caribbean focusing on their colonial past, their current positioning in the world, their social structure, cultural patterns and current transnationalism. Using social history, film and music we will explore the topics of race, class, family, gender, religion, national identity and underdevelopment. Comparative research projects will provide concrete instances of the differences and similarities between the Anglo-Caribbean, Franco-Caribbean, and Hispanic Caribbean. This course is open to all students.



Instructor Units Lecture
E. Fields-Black 9 TR 9:00-10:20

This course will examines the pervasive, world-spanning institution of human slavery. Although the time frame this course deals with is broad - from the rise of complex societies in the ancient world to slavery-like labor systems in the modern era - this class will focus more thoroughly on a few case studies, especially slavery in the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa, the US, and the Caribbean. These disparate examples will be related to a number of core themes, including race, class, family, gender, religion, national identity and underdevelopment. This course will be co-taught on CMU's Pittsburgh and Qatar campuses.



Instructor Units Lecture
D. Glave 9 W 6:30-9:20PM

This course explores black film emphasizing the historical and contemporary impact of resistance from enslavement to the present. Resistance was expressed by blacks through passive resistance, violence, striving to be middle-class, and even reinventing black stereotypes. Some eras in which these ideas were expressed included enslavement, the American Revolution, World Wars I and II, Civil Rights, and the Age of Obama. Within these periods, there were major social and political transformative movements including slave revolts, the anti-slavery movement, black women’s rights, Black Power, and Black Lives Matter.

The films will include “The Hate You Give,” Oscar Micheaux’s “Within Our Gates,” “Sankofa,” “12 Years a Slave,” “Glory,” “Shaft,” and “Imitation of Life.” Class structure will be based in part on the following questions:

  • What is the significance and meaning of the history of resistance in black film?
  • How can we use the tools for studying history to better understand resistance in black film?
  • How do we analyze this history?
  • How can we contextualize contemporary issue and popular culture through the history of black film?


Instructor Units Lecture
J. Trotter 9 TR 9:00-10:20

This course explores changes in the African American experience from the end of the Civil War to the emerging era of Donald Trump. The course emphasizes transformations in both inter- and intra-race relations; economic mobility as well as economic inequality; and forms of political engagement and grassroots movements for social change. In Part I, the course opens with an examination of the notion of a "Post-Racial Society" in the United States. This idea emerged in the wake of the Modern Black Freedom Movement and persists to this day as the 21st century unfolds. Part II locates the roots of 20th century black life and history in the emancipation of enslaved people in the years after the Civil War. This segment of the course will not only give close attention to the meaning of emancipation and freedom for black people, but also charts the rise of a new Jim Crow social order by World War I. Third and most important, this course will illuminate the transformation of African American culture, politics, and community under the impact of the 20th century Great Migration; the rise of the urban-industrial working class; increasing residential segregation; growth and expansion of the middle class; and the fluorescence of the Modern Black Liberation Movement. Students will compare the dynamics of the contemporary Black Lives Matter Movement with earlier 20th century grassroots social and political movements in African American and U.S. history. Finally, based upon a mix of primary and secondary sources and lectures, students will examine a wide range of intellectual debates in African American history; write a series of short analytical essays; and establish their own unique interpretation of key issues in Black History.



Instructor Units Lecture
D. Harsch 9 TR 3:00-4:20

Who was Adolf Hitler? What motivated him? What did he believe? Why did Germans support him? How did he rise to power? How did he use his power? This course covers the biography of Hitler, placing his life in the political and economic context of his era. Through a combination of lectures and discussion, the class will consider: Hitler and his political movement, Hitler and his people, Hitler and his enemies, Hitler and his war, Hitler and his crimes, Hitler and his place in history. We will discuss his upbringing, personality, and strengths and weaknesses as a political leader and military strategist. We will study his worldview, including his ethno-nationalism, antisemitism, and anti-Communism. We will examine his role in the origins and implementation of the Holocaust. Readings will include works by historians, excerpts from Mein Kampf, and the writings of his fellow Nazis and other contemporaries. The class will also analyze the portrayal of Hitler in documentary and feature films. Students will write three papers: two papers of 5-6 pages each, based on in-class readings/films, and a final research paper of 12 pages, based on six outside readings.



Instructor Units Lecture
B. Weiner 9 TR 1:30-2:50

This course is an introduction to late-imperial "Chinese" history and society with a focus on the Qing dynasty (1644-1912). We begin by examining the Qing not just as the last of China's imperial dynasties but also as an early-modern, multi-ethnic empire that included Mongolia, Tibet, and Xinjiang. In fact, China's "last emperors" were actually Manchus from northeast Asia. Secondly we investigate the social, economic, intellectual and demographic developments that transformed late-imperial China prior to the coming of the West. Thirdly, we examine Qing responses to a string of nineteenth-century disruptions, including but not limited to western imperialism, that threatened to not only end the dynasty but also challenged the very tenants of Chinese civilization. Lastly, we will look at the fall of China's imperial system, the end of empire, and the post-imperial struggle to reformulate the state and re-imagine society for the twentieth century.



Instructor Units Lecture
C. Storella 9 MW 9:00-10:20

This course covers a broad sweep of Russian history beginning with the first settlements of tribal nomads in the ninth century and ending with the fall of the 300-year-old Romanov dynasty in 1917. Our course profiles how the Russian state was formed and how its territory expanded to become a mighty empire. Over the centuries, we make the acquaintance of Mongol marauders, greedy princes, and peasant rebels, as well as Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, and the long succession of reformers and reactionaries who occupied the Russian throne. We explore terrorism, general strikes, and development of the revolutionary movement that ultimately brought down the Tsar in 1917.



Instructor Units Lecture
M. Friedman 9 MW 1:30-2:50

This course will examine the history of anti-Jewish hatred and violence from the Middle Ages through the Holocaust. The course will focus on representative case studies, texts, and films. These will include pre-modern incidents of "fake news" such as the medieval rumor of "blood libel" that unleashed massacres and mass expulsions of Jews from countless communities. In examining the rise of modern anti-Semitism we shall focus on debates over Jewish assimilation and citizenship and consider the popular impact of the print media's dissemination of conspiracy theories of Jewish world domination, including the infamous forgery "The Protocols of the Elders of Zion." We will also examine cases of mass anti-Jewish violence, known as pogroms, in Eastern Europe and Russia, and the genocidal onslaught against European Jewry by the National Socialist regime. Finally, we will discuss the resurgence of anti-Semitism in contemporary Europe.



Instructor Units Lecture
N. Theriault 9 TR 3:00-4:20

We live in an increasingly interconnected world, one in which our everyday actions have repercussions across vast distances. To understand this ever-denser web of connections, we must think beyond simplistic accounts of globalization as a uniformly positive, negative, or homogenizing process. Economic crisis, impoverishment, rising inequality, environmental degradation, pandemic disease, and irredentist movements are just as much a part of the story as are technological innovation, digital communication, global supply chains, cultural exchange, the promotion of human rights, and the rise of cosmopolitan values. This course aims to equip you with a conceptual toolkit for thinking critically and holistically about the many dimensions of globalization. By examining how globalization connects and shapes the everyday lives of people around the world, including our own, we will establish a foundation both for your advanced coursework in Global Studies and for your lifelong education as a globally aware professional and citizen.



Instructor Units Lecture
P. Eiss 6 TR 10:30-11:50

In this course we will consider the historical emergence and transformation of the U.S.-Mexico border, as much as an idea as a physical boundary. Our explorations will be far-ranging: from the initial encounters of Christopher Columbus and Hernán Cortés with indigenous populations, to social, cultural and political dynamics of the borderlands in subsequent centuries; from the experiences and practices of cross border migrants, to contemporary immigration debates and policies surrounding migration, border control and walling, and the deportation of unauthorized migrants.



Instructor Units Lecture
A. Oren

6

MW 6:30-7:50PM

This course will explore the genealogy of the term "ghetto". For most Americans, "ghetto" probably makes them think of poor urban neighborhoods, or of Jews living under Nazi oppression. Most do not know that the first ghetto was established 500 years ago, to keep Jews separate from Catholics. After quickly reviewing how ghettos spread throughout early modern Europe, the course will shift its focus to the Americas. We will examine when and how the term "ghetto" arrived in the United States, and how the use and application of the term changed before the 1930s. For the majority of the course we will study how "ghetto" became associated with black urban neighborhoods, and what role local, state, and federal governments played in forming postwar American ghettos. By the end of the course students should better understand the origins of current urban policy and will be prepared to critique and make arguments about how urban policy is often used as a political tool.



Instructor Units Lecture
J. Soluri 9 TR 1:30-2:50

[Note: students who have taken the mini course, 79-280, Brewing Revolution? Coffee and Social Change from Adam Smith to Starbucks, may not enroll.]

What role has coffee played in connecting people and places to capitalist markets and consumer cultures? What are the economic, social, and environmental consequences of these connections? How did espresso change from an "ethnic drink" to something served at McDonalds? Why do college students (and professors!) hang out in coffee shops? This course will answer these questions and more by using coffee to learn about the history of capitalism, and capitalism to understand the history of coffee. We will follow the spread of coffee and capitalism across the globe, with excursions to places where people grow coffee (Ethiopia, Yemen, Indonesia, Brazil, and Costa Rica), and also where they drink coffee (Seattle, Tokyo, Seoul, New York, and Berlin). In the process, we will confront global problems linked to economic inequality, trade, gender relations, and environmental degradation. Course meetings will combine interactive lecture, group discussions, and mini-presentations. Assignments will include journal responses, ethnographic observations, and writing a short script that tells a story about coffee and capitalism.



Instructor Units Lecture
J. Gilchrist 9 TR 10:30-11:50

Religion can be understood from the "outside," through the academic lenses of history, sociology, psychology, philosophy, etc., and from the "inside," listening to the experiences and reflections of those who practice various faiths. The course will examine major religious traditions from several perspectives, and begin to explore such topics as the relationship between religion and science, faith and reason, and religion in public life. This introduction is designed for students with a general interest in religion, as well as those contemplating a Religious Studies minor.



Instructor Units Lecture
E. Fields-Black 6 TR 1:30-2:50

"The Slave Passage" begins among flourishing, technologically advanced, and globally connected regions of Western Africa before the advent of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. It tells the painful story of African captives during the Middle Passage, piecing together the historical record to recognize their suffering aboard the slaving vessels and their multiple strategies of resistance. Students will study slave narratives, slave ship logs, and autobiographies of former enslaved people, as well as analyze films and theater performances depicting the Middle Passage and New World enslavement.



Instructor Units Lecture
L. Herckis 6 TR 3:00-4:20

Archaeology of Technology is a new course that surveys the archaeology of invention and the “immaterial”. We live in an increasingly immaterial world, in which many of the artifacts we value are digital, and our relationships are built beyond the confines of face-to-face interactions. This course will explore the relationship between people and the artifacts they create by addressing one big question that is of equal concern to social scientists and historians alike: Why and how do some inventions spread like wildfire and dramatically transform society?



Instructor Units Lecture
J. Aronson 6 MW 12:00-1:20

[Note: students who have already taken this course under its former title 79-302, Drone Warfare and Killer Robots: Ethics, Law, Politics, and Strategy, may not enroll.]

Unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) have become a central feature of the United States' global counterterrorism strategy since September 11, 2001, and autonomous weapons systems (often called "killer robots" by critics) are increasingly being integrated into military arsenals around the world. According to proponents, drones and autonomous weapons systems are much safer than manned systems, so accurate that they can be used to target individuals and detect threats in real time, and efficient and inexpensive enough to be used for long-term surveillance and protection missions around the globe. According to critics, the use of such systems is problematic because of the obfuscation of historically accepted chains of accountability and responsibility, and the difficulty of translating complex ethical decision making processes into computer code. This course will evaluate these issues through the lenses of law, politics, morality, history, and military strategy.



Instructor Units Lecture
C. Phillips 9 MW 11:30-12:20
Section A-F 11:30-12:20
Section B-F 12:30-1:20

From conducting clinical trials and evaluating prisoners' parole cases to drafting professional ballplayers, we increasingly make decisions using mathematical concepts and models. This course surveys the development of--and resistance to--such tools by grounding them in the recent cultural history of the United States. Focusing on baseball, medicine, and the law, we'll explore how and why Americans have come to believe mathematical and computational methods can solve complicated problems, even in seemingly unrelated moral, political, and social domains. The course encourages students to think critically about the wider implications of these transformations by situating their development historically.



Instructor Units Lecture
L. Z. Eisenberg 9 MWF 12:30-1:20

This course looks at the historic relationship among Islam, Judaism and Christianity and what they have to say about the nature of government, the state's treatment of religious minorities, and relations among states in the Middle East. We will consider the impact of religion on domestic and foreign policy in selected Middle Eastern countries and communities, the role of religion in fueling conflicts, the phenomenon of religious fundamentalism, the challenge and opportunity this presents to the United States, and the potential for religion to help advance Middle East peace. We will take advantage of the unprecedented upheavals roiling the Middle East since 2011 and use contemporary social media to contact people on the ground in the states we are studying to produce "updates" as to where religion and politics seem to be intersecting at this time.



Instructor Units Lecture
N. Slate 6 TR 1:30-2:50
W 6:30-9:20PM

Bollywood films attract hundreds of millions of viewers, not just in India but throughout the world. The name "Bollywood" makes it seem that the Indian film industry is a junior partner, merely an echo of Hollywood. But more films are made in Mumbai every year than in Los Angeles. And Mumbai is only one of many film hubs in India. The rich diversity of Indian cinema speaks to the equally rich history of India itself. This course uses Indian movies to examine several key themes in India's history. We will focus on the twentieth century and on questions of democracy, diversity, and development. This course includes a mandatory film screening on Wednesday evenings beginning at 6:30pm.



Instructor Units Lecture
N. Theriault 9 TR 10:30-11:50

This course examines the history of women's rights agitation in the United States from the early nineteenth-century to the present. It investigates both well-known struggles for women's equality--including the battles for women's voting rights, an Equal Rights Amendment, and access to birth control--and also explores the history of lesser-known struggles for economic and racial justice. Because women often differed about what the most important issues facing their sex were, this course explores not only the issues that have united women, but also those that have divided them—keeping intersectionality and women’s diversity at the center of the course.



Instructor Units Lecture
T. Haggerty 6 TR 3:00-4:20

US Gay and Lesbian History offers an overview of the changing context and circumstances of sexual minorities in American culture. From early constructions of moral opprobrium, criminal deviance or medical pathology, the LGBT community emerged in the twentieth and twenty-first century as a political constituency and a vital part of contemporary society. Students should be aware that this course will necessarily address issues of intimate relations and sexuality as well as broader historical issues.



Instructor Units Lecture
D. Oresick 9 Mondays 6:30-9:20PM

Invented in 1839, photography was a form of visual expression that immediately attracted a large public following. Starting around 1900, photography was practiced with two dominant strands. One of these firmly believed in the power of photographs to provide a window on the world, and was led by Lewis Hine, whose documentary photographs for the National Child Labor Committee helped to ameliorate living and working conditions for thousands of immigrant children. The other strand adhered to the philosophy of Alfred Stieglitz who adamantly affirmed that photographs were first and foremost reflections of the soul and were art objects, equal to painting, drawing and sculpture. These two schools of thought guided photographers throughout the twentieth century. This course explores in depth the tremendous range of photographic expression since World War II and examines in particular the contributions of significant image-makers such as Helen Levitt, W. Eugene Smith, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, Garry Winogrand, Charles "Teenie" Harris, Cindy Sherman, Carrie Mae Weems, Nan Goldin, James Nachtwey, and many others. Classes include a slide lecture, student presentation, and video segments that introduce a focused selection of images by major photographers in an attempt to understand their intentions, styles, and influences. In Spring 2017, students will be expected to make one or more visits to photography exhibitions on view in Pittsburgh (locations to be announced at the first class in January.)



Instructor Units Lecture
K. Coopie 6 TR 12:00-1:20

A few years ago, the word "impeachment" drew talk of President Bill Clinton, White House interns, and definitions of the word, "is". Since President Donald Trump's inauguration in early 2017, the prospect of impeachment charges has become a regular media concern. In this course, we will examine the basis for the option of impeachment - the Constitutional power of the legislature to remove the President or other federal officials from office for "treason, bribers, or other high crimes and misdemeanors." While Presidents may be the most high-profile subjects of impeachment, we will also examine the other 17 federal officers that have been impeached in the past, as well as a number of state officials who have been impeached, including Louisiana Governor Huey Long in 1929 and Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich in 2009. We will also discuss the potential for, and implications of, an impeachment of President Donald Trump.



Instructor Units Lecture
S. Schlossman 6 MW 3:00-4:20

How have American films portrayed juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system? What does filmmakers' portrayal of juvenile delinquency tell us about American culture and society? Do films vividly capture or badly distort the "realities" of crime and the operations of the justice system? This course uses feature films (to be viewed in advance of class) from the 1920s to the early 1960s, as well as various sociological, psychological, and historical readings, to explore these issues. The course is run as a colloquium, with students playing central leadership roles in launching and guiding class discussions. The course will have a take-home midterm exam (essay), a final exam (essay), and a few short, written assignments linked to students' required oral presentations in class.



Instructor Units Lecture
N. Kats 9 MW 10:30-11:50

This course is based on use of historical documents and films to study problems that reshaped the world during and after the Cold War. We will examine how documentary and feature films depicted the most important events of the Cold War, such as the Korean War, the construction of the Berlin Wall, the Cuban missile crisis, and others. In addition to films, sources will include documents, lectures and readings.



Instructor Units Lecture
A. Masich 6 W 2:30-5:20PM

Museums and other non-academic institutions reach large audiences with an array of history offerings, including exhibitions, films, publications, performances, oral history, workshops, lectures, events, research, reenactments, lectures, social media, webinars, online, radio and television programming. These educational tools are calculated to engage diverse audiences. Museums and educational nonprofits are also actively collecting and preserving artifacts and archival materials. This course will focus on Pittsburgh history as students examine best practices in Public History. The class will study the inner workings of a large history museum's collection, exhibition, conservation and education programs. Students will participate in field trips and behind-the-scenes tours, virtual explorations, and "hands-on history" outside the classroom at the Heinz History Center and other Pittsburgh attractions. This course will especially interest students considering non-traditional careers in history, education, communications, and nonprofits.

Maximum enrollment is 15.

All classes will be held once per week off campus, starting at the Heinz History Center in the Strip District (1212 Smallman Street). Professor Masich is the History Center's CEO.



Instructor Units Lecture
S. Sandage 9 TR 1:30-2:50

This course is about open source, collaborative innovation and the impact of social and technological change on American music. We will spend the first 8 weeks on early "remix" music (slave songs, Anglo-Appalachian ballads, ragtime, and Depression era blues and country). After studying Bessie Smith, Woody Guthrie, Lead Belly, Hank Williams, and other early artists, we'll spend the last 7 weeks on revolutionaries like Chuck Berry, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, and Janis Joplin. The format is informal lecture and discussion. Assignments include reading two books plus some articles, weekly music listening, short papers, and a final project. NB: This course may be taken pass-fail (with submission of appropriate form).



Instructor Units Lecture
B. Burstin 6 TR 12:00-1:20

This course will challenge you to explore profoundly disturbing historical material. We will examine aspects of history on both sides of the Atlantic with regard to Hitler, the Nazis and America’s response in the 1930s and 1940s. This course will compel you to think not only about what happened and why, but also about the implications for us today as individuals and as Americans. Films, a meeting with a survivor or child of survivor as well as the inclusion of survivor accounts in the readings will serve to strengthen the learning impact.



Instructor Units Lecture
J. Suzik 6 TR 6:30-7:50PM

This course examines the history of children's experiences in American K-12 schools, both public and private, at three critical moments in the 20th and early 21st centuries. We will first examine the emergence of Progressivism as a perceived antidote to the impacts of industrialization, urbanization, and the immigrant experience on children and youth in the early 1900s. We will then study the retreat from Progressive educational ideas in the wake of the Cold War and "Space Race" with the Soviet Union in the decades following World War II. Finally, we will analyze the impacts on American schoolchildren of the "Excellence" and "No Child Left Behind" movements that began around the turn of the 21st century and and continue today. To ground class discussions, we will use both secondary and primary historical sources, including policy and curricular documents, documentary film, and first-person accounts of both children and teachers in schools.



Instructor Units Lecture
J. Tarr, M. Tarr 9 MW 10:30-11:50

Course Description. How do we, as human beings, experience the urban environment? We explore the underlying psychological and neural basis of our perceptions as they create the experience of historical change.



Instructor Units Lecture
J. Aronson 9 MW 1:30-2:50

For many commentators, the election of Donald Trump in November 2016 marks the beginning of the "post-truth" era, in which reality is no longer knowable, or even relevant. While this narrative certainly captures the unease that many Americans feel, it is historically inaccurate. There never was a time in the past when we could readily discern truth from falsehood without difficulty. The goal of this course is to examine the social history of truth. We will explore the concept of truth in philosophy and science; the evolution of methods for discovering facts about the world; the centrality of trust in knowledge production; and the innumerable ways that facts have been questioned, manipulated, discredited, purposefully ignored, and fabricated over the past several centuries. The course will include case studies from science, law, politics, war, art, journalism, and history.


Instructor Units Lecture
V. Keller 6 TR 6:30-7:50PM

In this course we will investigate the historical roles played by people in creating the conditions for disastrous floods and hurricanes in the United States, examining the material causes of "natural disasters" and analyzing how Americans have been affected differently according to race and class. By the end of the course, we will have examined some of America's largest flood and hurricane disasters in their historical contexts, and we will use this knowledge to think about disasters that Americans face now and in the future.


Instructor Units Lecture
N. Theriault 9 TR 10:30-11:50

Earth is an increasingly toxic planet. Fossil-fueled industrialization, chemical engineering, and resource-intensive consumerism have generated immense wealth, but they have also left long-term, cumulative legacies of toxic pollution and ecological harm. While these legacies affect everyone, their impacts are by no means evenly distributed. In this course, we will use the tools of anthropology, political ecology, and history to examine experiences of toxic exposure in different parts of the world, including Pittsburgh. Our analyses will ask how inequalities of race, class, and gender shape exposure as well as how cultural differences create divergent understandings of ecology, health, and their interrelationship. We will consider, moreover, how these disparities shape what people know about pollution and whether/how they demand accountability for it. Cases we explore will range from acute industrial disasters (and their aftermath) to the harms experienced by other-than-human beings to the gradual, often invisible exposures that affect all of us to varying degrees.


Instructor Units Lecture
M. Friedman 6 MW 10:30-11:50

Francisco Franco was Europe's longest-ruling dictator. He ruled over Spain from 1939 to 1975. This course will examine the social and cultural context of the rise of Fascism in Spain. We will focus especially on Franco's seizure of power during the Spanish Civil War; the decades of his lengthy dictatorship; the social and cultural politics in transitioning Spain to democracy after his death; and the legacy of Spanish Fascism and Franco's dictatorship in contemporary Spain.


Instructor Units Lecture
A. Owen 6 TR 9:00-10:20

For studying the past, space can be as important as time. Digital mapping and GeoLocation technologies influence our everyday interactions and perceptions of the world around us. Historians are thinking about how these technologies can change their fields of study, too. Through the "spatial turn" in the Humanities and Social Sciences, historians are using spatial experience to think more deeply about the meaning of place and space. Visualizing spatial relationships via new technologies can offer meaningful new ways to approach historical questions. This course will consider viewpoints from the discipline of Geography and explore the impact of new methods in the Digital Humanities, including the impact of digital tools such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS).


Instructor Units Lecture
N. Kats 9 M 6:30-9:20PM

This course will explore the interrelations between society and classical and popular music in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in Europe and the United States. We will examine the importance of different musical forms in the life of society and how music contributed to the making of political consciousness, especially in the twentieth century. In addition to reading assignments, seminar discussions, and research papers in the history of music, students will be taken to the performances of the Pittsburgh Symphony, Pittsburgh Opera, and Chamber Music Society. A supplemental fee of a minimum of $275 will be charged to subsidize part of the considerable expense of purchasing tickets for concerts and performances. Prerequisite: Availability to attend musical events on several Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings.


Instructor Units Lecture
N. Abraham 9 MWF 9:30-10:20

This course introduces students to the diversity of Arab culture in the Middle East and North Africa through a variety of critically-acclaimed films and two novels. The course topics aim to challenge stereotypes and foster a better understanding of the social reality of Arab societies. The films and novels un-romanticize the portrayal of childhood and adulthood and offer insight into the hardships and concerns that face Arab youth. Topics covered are the role of religion vis-à-vis key social and family values in everyday life, childhood and education, masculinity, homo/sexuality, gender roles, challenges in conflict zones, and revolution music and art that emerged since the Arab uprising of 2011. Students will have the opportunity to engage in three video-conference dialogues with Saudi, Moroccan, and Egyptian students at universities in Saudi Arabia, Morocco, and Egypt, respectively, to allow for live interaction, exchange, and learning, as well as interview one or two Arabic-native speakers to further their learning. There will be one cooking workshop on Arab cuisine!


Instructor Units Lecture
N. Kats 9 TR 10:30-11:50

The October Revolution of 1917 had profound effects not only for Russian society, but also for literature and culture. Even before the Revolution, Vladimir Lenin stressed the importance of literature on the hearts and minds of people. After the Revolution, the new Soviet state demanded writers to become, in Stalin's words, "engineers of human souls," and proclaimed "socialist realism" as the only permissible method of creative work in literature. This course focuses on masterpieces of Russian prose and poetry of the 20th century. Readings will include the "proletarian" writings of Maxim Gorky, the "symbolism" of Alexander Blok, the "futurism" and "modernism" of Vladimir Mayakovsky, as well as works by many other authors. We will discuss such important issues for Russian cultural history as the role of the intelligentsia in the Russian Revolution; the content and method of Russian decadence; symbolism and modernism; and the experience of imprisonment, liberation, and exile that became so important for many writers and poets.


Instructor Units Lecture
T. Gershkovich 9 TR 3:00-4:20

The Russian hacker looms large in the global imagination. He's the cyber outlaw who we imagine can take down the powerful with the click of a finger, sometimes serving as an agent of the Russian government, at other times threatening the state itself. This course will examine the mythology and reality of the Russian hacker by tracing its prehistory, from anarchists in Imperial Russia, to Bolshevik revolutionaries, to dissident artists of the Soviet Union, and finally to contemporary heretics such as Pussy Riot and Edward Snowden. The course will culminate in a student-led symposium on the sociocultural role of the Russian hacker. This course follows a seminar format. Students will be required to critically analyze literature, film, and historical documents. They will work on written exercises that prepare them to write a research paper to be presented at the symposium. This is a 9-unit course. For those proficient in Russian, however, a total of 12 units can be earned by conducting some portion of the work in Russian and meeting outside of class for some additional hours. Details are to be worked out in advance, in consultation with the instructor.


Instructor Units Lecture
C. Skibba 9 MW 1:30-2:50

"Even today, I've no idea what the truth is, or what I did with it." ¿ Luis Buñuel, My Last Sigh Spanish film is known for its quirkiness, irreverence and, as referenced by the inimitable Luis Buñuel, contemplation of truth. This course will enter into that discourse by analyzing films from 20th and 21st century Spain. While no prior knowledge of Spanish language, culture nor history are required, interest in cultural exploration and critical thinking are necessary. Film analysis will form part of the crux of the course, as we will examine cinematography, sound, script, and music. Some questions that might arise may include - How does the film portray emotion? How does the film reflect cultural nuance? The class will be student-centered, and thus highly interactive. It is also a goal of this course to stimulate analytical thinking, and to promote the close readings of texts directed by argumentation and well-structured insights.