Carnegie Mellon University

2018 Fall Semester

Below is the list of Undergraduate courses offered by the History Department for Fall 2018. Extensive course listings can also be found on the Undergraduate Catalog.

View the complete Course Descriptions as a PDF »


Instructor Units Lecture 1: MW 12:30-1:20
R. Law 9 Recitations on Fridays

Today, halting genocide and curbing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction rank among the top priorities in international relations. This understanding of world affairs, however, did not always hold true. In fact, if anything, in the last few centuries various individuals and institutions channeled much effort into the invention and refinement of new ideological, organizational, and technological means for mass murder or waging war. How and why did modern societies become so competent in inflicting death and destruction on fellow humans? What has been and can be done to prevent similar occurrences from happening again?

This Global History course will answer these questions by analyzing the causes of and responses to past incidents resulting in mass deaths or tools for armed conflicts. Through lectures, discussion, primary sources, and assignments, the course will examine events within the European encounter with the Western Hemisphere, Imperialism in Africa, the Holocaust, the atomic bombings of Japan, the Cold War, and decolonization and independence. By the end of the course, students will come to realize the historical significance of unintended consequences and the ambiguity of human progress.



Instructor Units Lecture 2, MW 1:30-2:20
R. Law 9 Recitations on Fridays

By the end of the 20th century, the spread of democracy seemed all but inevitable as most nations in the world had established a version of it as their governing system. Even many of those that had not still adopted trappings of democracy such as popular elections, representative assemblies, constitutions, and terms of office. Yet the history of collective governance has shown repeatedly that its progress is not unstoppable or its continuation irreversible, and that democracies rose and fell just like other systems of government.

Nevertheless, the ideals of democracy remain a powerful inspiration today. How did democracy become such a widespread phenomenon? What are its features, strengths, and weaknesses? What factors determined whether a democracy would thrive or collapse? This Global History course will answer these questions by surveying the origins and developments of democratic systems in Ancient Rome, Revolutionary France, Weimar Germany, Taisho Japan, and others. By the end of the course, students will come to understand the importance of past lessons and the appeal and challenges of collective governance, and decide for themselves what role democracy should play in their lives.



Instructor Units Lecture 3 MW 10:30-11:20
A. Ramey 9 Recitations on Fridays

Empire, Environment, and the Economy explores the development of the modern world by looking at a major global transformation that has taken place over the past 500 years: the creation of a tightly connected global economy linking nation-states together through warfare, politics, and a near total-command of the Earth's natural resources. This state of affairs, which we take to be normal at first look, is in fact a radical departure from the rest of human history. Over the past 500 years, large agrarian empires gave way to nations, a decentralized world economy came to revolve around a few key hubs, and natural resources from forests and fisheries to coal and the climate have become increasingly dominated by human activity. Whether this system represents a new normal or a temporary interlude before reverting back to deeper patterns from human history remains to be seen. By reading the works of leading scholars, examining historical documents, and discussing among ourselves, we will try to make sense of the modern world by looking at how we have gotten here and where we might be going.



Instructor Units Lecture
K. Lynch 9 TR 9:00-10:20

This course introduces students to methods and materials that historians use to study the past, and how they present and debate findings. We study what historians consider "best practices" for doing research in primary and secondary sources.

We discuss how to ask questions or pose problems about the past that will enable students to develop a research topic, find appropriate primary and secondary sources, take notes from those sources, and write a paper that answers the original question using skills we have studied.

We will use the topic of World War I as the theme for the semester . The first part of the class will consist of readings from primary sources such as eyewitness accounts, memoirs, poetry, and film to understand the meanings that participants gave to the experience of war. We also read secondary accounts of the war in which historians recount the war and assess the longer-term meanings it. In addition to our discussions of these assigned readings, students will develop, carry out, and report to the class on their research topics, so that , by the end of the semester, the group will have built an understanding of the war in its many dimensions.

Work includes reading and discussing course texts, completing short assignments, sharing writing-in-progress, oral reports to classmates, and a final research paper of 10-15 pages.



Instructor Units Lecture
M. Friedman 9 12:00-1:20

[Note: students who have already taken this course under its former title 79-205, 20th Century Europe may not enroll.] This course surveys the history of Europe from 1900 to 2000 and beyond. While it covers major political trends and social/economic changes of the last century, it concentrates on the following themes: the extraordinary violence of the two World Wars -- and their continuing impact on politics, society, and culture; social and political movements/regimes of the Far Right and of the Socialist/Communist Left; the rise and crisis of the European welfare state and of the European Union; reactions to U.S. power and to Americanization; cultural and political controversies surrounding Islam and Muslims in Europe today.



Instructor Units Lecture
A. Creasman 9 TR 3:00-4:20

Between the late 15th and the early 18th centuries, many Europeans became convinced that their society was threatened by a conspiracy of diabolic witches. Although Western beliefs in witchcraft and “devil worship” dated back to antiquity, the 16th and 17th centuries witnessed the most intense campaign of witch-hunting in all of Europe's history. Before it was over, the "Great European Witch-Hunt" of the early modern era cost the lives of thousands across Europe and in its colonies. And although the witch-hunts in early modern Europe and its colonies gradually came to an end, beliefs in witchcraft persist into the modern era and, in many parts of the world today, continue to generate campaigns of popular violence against alleged perpetrators. This course examines witchcraft beliefs and witch-hunting in historical perspective in both their European and colonial contexts. In addition to the early modern witch-hunts, it will address modern witchcraft beliefs and consider witch-hunting as a global problem today. It will focus on the origin and rationale of witch beliefs, the factors driving the timing and intensity of witch-hunts, and the patterns of accusations. Throughout, we will examine the many historical and regional variations in witch beliefs and prosecutions and explore how they reflect major social and cultural issues such as the relationship between "popular" and "elite" culture; religious change; state formation; gender and patriarchy; and the rationalization of law, medicine, and science.

This course satisfies one of the elective requirements for the Religious Studies minor.



Instructor Units Lecture
N. Theriault 9 MW 3:00-4:20

When you hear the term “Southeast Asia,” what comes to mind? The Vietnam War? The ruins of the Angkor civilization? Beautiful beaches? Or perhaps your own ethnic heritage? However you imagine it, Southeast Asia is an incredibly diverse and dynamic region that has long been integral to world affairs and whose importance continues to grow. This course offers a wide-ranging survey of Southeast Asia’s peoples, their histories, and some of the issues they face today. Together we will explore the region as a “global crossroads,” where the world’s religions, economies, cultures, and politics come together in generative, sometimes traumatic, and often surprising ways.



Instructor Units Lecture
K. Lynch 6 TR 1:30-2:50

This course asks a simple question with a complex answer: Why is it that the modern history of the French capital has been so marked by uprisings that challenged and sometimes overthrew the existing political regime? What accounts for this political instability?

We answer these questions by studying a selection of well-known examples of Paris uprisings from the period of great the French Revolution (began 1789) through May, 1968.

We examine major causes of the revolt, the kinds of people who led and followed it, and its consequences in the short- and longer-term. We also learn about the "culture" that surrounded political and social movements through eyewitness accounts, speeches, literature and the arts. While we are doing this, we'll try to learn as much as we can about continuities and changes in the city itself -- its population and built environment.

Coursework will consist of attending lectures, responding orally and in writing to assigned readings and several films, and a comparative final essay.



Instructor Units Lecture
B. Weiner 3 T 10:30-11:50

This course examines the rise, rule, and impact of the Mongol Empire on global history. In the 13th century, Eurasia was shaken by a force contemporary chroniclers likened to an apocalypse. Within a few decades, horsemen under the command of Chinggis (Genghis) Khan swept out of the northeastern steppe to establish the largest land empire the world would ever know. Few events in world history have inspired such fear and awe. However, the Mongol period also ushered in the so-called pax Mongolica, the first period of sustained contact and exchange across Eurasia as people, technologies, arts, biodiversity, and ideas spread throughout the Mongol domains and beyond. Questions to be examined include: Who was Genghis Khan and how did he lead a little known nomadic people to conquer much of the known world? What cultural and technological innovations aided the Mongols rise and conquest? How did Genghis’s successors rule their vast, diverse domains? What role did religion play in Mongol Eurasia? Why did a unified Mongol empire fall apart in such a relatively short period of time? And how did the Mongols and their empire help shape the world we live in today?



Instructor Units Lecture
P. Eiss 9 MW 1:30-2:50

This course provides a survey of Mexican history and culture over a variety of periods, from the rise of the Aztec empire, to Spanish conquest and colonization, to national independence, to the Mexican Revolution and contemporary Mexico. A wide range of topics will be addressed, such as: race, ethnicity, and indigeneity; state formation and politics; national identity and the politics of memory; migration and the border; and the drug war. Students will discuss historical and anthropological scholarship on Mexico, but will also consider cultural documents of various kinds, like Mexican music, art, and food.



Instructor Units Lecture
E. Fields-Black 9 TR 10:30-11:50

The course is designed to give students an understanding and appreciation of African history and culture from the "inside out." Though it deals with the period of European expansion in Africa, it is centered on African language/ ethnic groups, villages, and individuals as historical actors who daily make collective and personal decisions to pass down, innovate, and borrow practices, technology, spiritual systems, etc. in the face of social, political, and economic realities. The course is also designed to get students thinking critically about how historians select and interpret sources to construct and reconstruct history at these different levels.



Instructor Units Lecture
A. Oren 6 MW 6:30-7:50 pm

Immigration became a prominent issue in national politics during the 2016 presidential campaign, and a contentious debate around immigration policy has carried forward into the current administration. American immigration history is long and complicated, but by pairing it with the history of a particular place (New York City) we can better understand the social, political, and cultural trends that have affected the policies of the United States government, the perceptions of Americans towards newcomers, and the lived experience of immigrants since the colonial period.

This course will explore such issues as whether New York, the nation's quintessential city of immigrants, has been a "melting pot" and entry point to the Land of Liberty. Has the city been a place where diverse groups of people from around the world have acculturated and Americanized? Or have immigrants to New York City mainly struggled to find acceptance, maintain their culture and traditions, and gain an economic foothold?



Instructor Units Lecture
S. Sandage 9 TR 10:30-11:50

This small discussion course traces ideas about individualism and capitalism in the U.S., from colonial times to the present. We will focus on three main themes: 1) the relationship between capitalism, work, and identity; 2) changing definitions of success and failure; and 3) the historical origins of students' attitudes toward 1 & 2. In short, we will study the economics and emotions of the American dream: how class, race, gender, occupation, and ambition shape our identities. Readings include "The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin," studies by Alexis de Tocqueville and Max Weber, writings of Frederick Douglass, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Herman Melville, Henry Thoreau, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Andrew Carnegie's classic essay "Gospel of Wealth," Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," and Malcolm Gladwell's "Outliers." Grading is based upon a readings journal, participation in discussion, three short essays and a longer final paper.



Instructor Units Lecture
B. Weiner 9 TR 1:30-2:50

This course is an introduction to major themes in twentieth-century Chinese history, including the transition from empire to nation, revolution, social change and modernization, western and Japanese imperialism, the rise of the party-state, Chinese socialism, economic liberalization and the so-called "Chinese Dream." The first half of the class is devoted to the period between the fall of the imperial system and the founding of the People's Republic of China (1911-1949). If the victory of the Chinese Communist Party and development of the socialist state are to be considered in historical context, it is necessary to first understand the political, cultural, economic and intellectual currents that immediately preceded them. During the second half of the course, we will examine the Maoist period (1949-1976). We will investigate the Chinese Communist Party as both a state-building institution and an engine of social transformation, and consider the tensions these dual roles produced. Finally, we will look at the Reform Period (1978-present), and reflect on a newly robust China's attempts to come to terms with its own recent past and what the consequences might be for both China and the world.



Instructor Units Lecture
B. Weiner 6 TR 10:30-11:50

[Note: students who have already taken this course under its former title 79-264, Tibet in History and Imagination, may not enroll.] This course is an introduction to the "Tibet Question," the dispute over whether Tibet should be part of China, an independent nation-state, or, as the current Dalai Lama now advocates, something in between. "History" often serves as the battleground on which competing visions of the nation are fought - who should be included and excluded, where "natural" boundaries begin and end. This almost always requires a process of simplification in which inconvenient details are forgotten or repurposed in the service of national agendas. The "Tibet Question" is a telling example. In this class, we investigate the historical relationship between "China" and "Tibet" from the 13th century through the present, and note the ways advocates on both sides of the "Tibet Question" have constructed historical narratives (propaganda) in support of their political positions. We will also discuss the prospects for a political solution and consider the lessons the "Tibet Question" may hold for understanding other outstanding "historical" disputes.



Instructor Units Lecture
TBA 9 TR 1:30-2:50

This course covers a broad sweep of Russian history from the socialist revolution in 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s. Spanning almost a century of upheaval and transformation, the course examines the October revolution in 1917, the ruthless power struggles of the 1920s, the triumph of Stalin, the costly industrialization and collectivization drives, the battle against fascism, and the "wild west" capitalism and collapse of the social welfare state. The course provides essential background for anyone interested in understanding Russia's place in the world today and its relationship with the West.



Instructor Units Lecture
J. Soluri 9 MW 12:00-1:20

This course will use readings, film/video, and popular music to examine the tumultuous and paradoxical relationship between Latin America and the United States from the early 1800s to the present, with an emphasis on Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean during the Cold War era (1945-1989) and its aftermath (1989-2014). During the Cold War years, the United States intervened frequently in Latin America; following the Cold War, a new geopolitics emerged shaped by trade policies, immigration, and illicit drug trades. We will study relationships between U.S. and Latin American governments ("state-state" relations), but we will also consider many other kinds of people and institutions including artists, athletes, businessmen, coffee farmers, consumers, corporations, Hollywood studios, journalists, migrant workers, musicians, rebels, scientists, and tourists. Evaluation will be based on class discussions, quizzes, mini-presentations, and written analysis of historical documents.



Instructor Units Lecture
J. Gilchrist 6 MW 10:30-11:50

“Separation of church and state” is an expression widely used but poorly understood. Thomas Jefferson’s phrase, which does not actually appear in the Constitution, reminds us that religious institutions are kept separate from government in America, even though religious commitments and motivations have always played an important part in American politics. This course will provide an historical perspective on the role of religion in public life from the late 18th century to the present, including religion’s influence on political parties and public policies, and the boundaries set by the Constitution on such activity.



Instructor Units Lecture
C. Phillips 9 TR 3:00-4:20

This course will describe and analyze aspects of the development of public policy in the United States from the colonial era to the present, with a focus on the post-Civil War era. For the purposes of this course, public policy will be defined as the making of rules and laws and their implementation by government in an attempt to achieve a particular normative vision of what society ought to be like. This course assumes that the public policy landscape is complex but still comprehensible given the proper set of analytical frameworks and appropriate historical background. This course will require extensive reading of policy positions, legal decisions, and historical analyses of policy debates. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing views about the authority of the government to intervene in economic and social issues; the best way to balance individual and collective interests; and the variability within society of the life courses of individuals. Topics to be covered include immigration, health care and health insurance, and education; assignments may include reading quizzes, in-class debates, and policy position papers.



Instructor Units Lecture
J. Tarr 6 MW 1:30-2:50

This course will focus on the transformations, both positive and negative, of Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh region in the period from 1945 through the present. It will explore the following themes: the redevelopment of the city in the Pittsburgh Renaissance, urban renewal and its consequences, the collapse of the steel industry and its impacts, the development of an Eds/Meds service economy, air, land and water environmental issues, and the city's changing demography.



Instructor Units Lecture
J. Hinkelman 9 TR 3:00-4:20

From the very beginning, film has provided a window into the past. But how useful are the images we see through that window? For every person who reads a work of history, thousands will see a film on the same subject. But who will learn more? Can written history and filmed history perform the same tasks? Should we expect them to do so? How are these two historical forms related? How can they complement each other? This course will draw examples from across the history of film in order to examine how the medium of film impacts our understanding of facts and events, the ways that film transfers those facts to the screen, and how that process affects the the creation of historical discourse. Films may include such titles as The Fall of the Roman Empire, The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, Saving Private Ryan, World Trade Center, Enemy at the Gates, Lagaan and Hero.



Instructor Units Lecture
L. Herckis 6 TR 9:00-10:20

Ancient tombs, dusty crypts, frozen bodies, mummies, and cemeteries are the stuff of adventure and fiction. Archaeologists examine causes of death in the past, and study how ancient peoples dealt with the dead, to learn about life in the past. This course will explore mortuary patterns (the treatment of the dead) in order to reconstruct prehistoric social organization. We will also discuss archaeological approaches to paleopathology and patterns of mortality in past populations.



Instructor Units Lecture
E. Grama 6 MW 3:00-4:20

What is home? What does it mean to belong, or not belong? What does it mean to be mobile? Is mobility a privilege or a curse? How do experiences of migration, exile, and displacement shift one’s understanding of home? This course will examine the emerging patterns of migration, mobility, and displacement in today’s world. We will engage with anthropological and sociological analyses of global migrations of people, capital, and ideas; social inequalities; “economic” and “environmental” refugees; new forms of political organization and governance (international, grass-roots, supranational); and new forms of political control (surveillance, “profiling,” militarization of borders, and race-related forms of rejection and violence). The grade will be based on participation in class discussions, one in-class presentation, and a reading diary, which will include written comments on the class readings posted weekly on Canvas.



Instructor Units Lecture
A. Owen 9 TR 12:00-1:20

Water is necessary for all forms of life on Earth. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to social and political aspects of water, using in-depth case studies that draw on a variety of perspectives. Examples of regional water projects we’ll study include traditional tank irrigation in South India; international negotiations along the Nile River; and the U.S. Government in negotiation with native activists and fisheries on the Columbia River. In addition to regional variety, readings will explore a variety of themes, for example, water and gender; water and armed conflict; and water and private companies versus public management. By the end of this course, students should be able to articulate their own answers to these questions: How have global organizations and participants characterized, enacted, and addressed problems of water supply and delivery for those who need it most? How do particular regions reflect global trends in water resource development, and how might these diverge from global trends? How have social and environmental studies in the literature of development come to understand the problem of water? One set of readings is assigned each week. Students should be prepared to discuss each week’s readings in a thoughtful way during class meeting time.



Instructor Units Lecture
D. Oresick 9 M 6:30-9:20 pm

9 units Mondays 6:30-9:20PM D. Oresick Photography was announced to the world almost simultaneously in 1839, first in France and then a few months later in England. Accurate "likenesses" of people were available to the masses, and soon reproducible images of faraway places were intriguing to all. This course will explore the earliest image-makers Daguerre and Fox Talbot, the Civil War photographs organized by Mathew Brady, the introduction in 1888 of the Kodak by George Eastman, the critically important social documentary photography of Jacob Riis and his successor, Lewis Hine, the Photo-Secession of Alfred Stieglitz, the Harlem Renaissance of James VanDerZee, the precisionist f64 photographers Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, and Edward Weston, and other important photographers who came before World War II. The class will be introduced to 19th century processes, such as the daguerreotype, tintype, and ambrotype, as well as albumen prints, cyanotypes, and more.



Instructor Units Lecture
L. Tetrault 6 MW 12:00-1:20

#metoo represents a sea change in society’s response to gender-based violence. But what is sexual harassment, exactly? When does something cross over into being inappropriate? Would you always know violence when you see it? Chances are, you wouldn’t.

Focusing on the U.S., this class dives into where we are, and how we got here. It addresses gender-based violence as a public health & human rights issue. It will delineate the legal and social definitions of gender violence, explore how those definitions function both positively and negatively, and examine the long history of protest that has culminated in this moment. Come join the conversation!



Instructor Units Lecture
C. Hagan 6 TR 12:00-1:20

Through primary documents, film and popular media, material culture, and interdisciplinary scholarship from the emerging field of girl(hood) studies, this course will examine historical conceptions of girlhood and accounts of girls' lives, to contemporary concerns and representations. In seeking to understand the meaning and experience of "modern" girlhood, our focus will primarily be on the 20th and 21st century American experiences, though at times we may look to perspectives from earlier periods and elsewhere in the world. Because there is no single experience or representation of girlhood, we will pay attention to the ways that girlhood is lived and constructed through the frameworks of race, class, culture, and geographic specificity.



Instructor Units Lecture
L. Tetrault 9 MW 1:30-2:50

[Note: Students who have taken 79-178, Freshman Seminar: Body Politics: Women and Health in America, may not enroll.] This course takes a topical, intersectional approach to the history of U.S. women's health in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It is less about governmental politics, although we do some of that. Rather, it sees bodies as cultural texts through which power is built and contested. The course covers topics such as the history of anatomy, menstruation, reproductive rights, body image, mental health, sexuality, violence, childbirth, and menopause. We explores how science and American culture both have constructed these issues over time (some of it is super whacky!), while also examining women's organizing around them. This course is open to all students.



Instructor Units Lecture
S. Alfonso-Wells 9 TR 6:30-7:50 pm

This course introduces students to an anthropological perspective on the relationship between sex (biological) and gender (cultural). In order to understand the various debates we will examine the ideas of manhood, womanhood, third genders and sexuality in cross-cultural perspective. The focus will be primarily on non western cultures and will examine the construction of status, sexuality, and gender roles within the broader context of ritual, symbolism, marriage, kinship. Utilizing film, the popular media, and anthropological case studies this course will provide students with ways to understand and question how and why we express ourselves as “men,” “women,” and “other.”



Instructor Units Lecture
S. Schlossman 6 TR 6:30-7:50

This course will track the development of an American institution, the juvenile court, in the context of changing patterns of juvenile delinquency from the early 19th century to the present. We will integrate historical, legal, sociological, and cultural perspectives in tracking the court's evolution, culminating in a careful look at how recent reform movements are playing out nationally. Readings will include a wide variety of secondary and primary historical sources from different time periods. We will also view and discuss several films (including Frederick Wiseman's 1973 classic, "Juvenile Court"). As opportunities develop, we may also hear from current court practitioners as guest lecturers. The course is run as a colloquium, with students playing central leadership roles in launching and guiding class discussions.



Instructor Units Lecture
N. Slate 9 TR 1:30-2:50

What is the relationship between education and democracy? By examining a series of case studies at the intersection of education and the civil rights movement, this course will prepare students to approach contemporary educational debates as historically-informed critical thinkers. The controversy surrounding charter schools, vouchers, the common core, and the role of standardized testing cannot be understood outside the long history of debates regarding the relationship between education and democracy. Are schools meant to perpetuate the status quo? How did both traditional and more radical forms of education advance the struggle for civil rights? What role have students played in advancing civil rights and democracy? While exploring these questions, we will also partner with local high school students and teachers to bring our learning beyond the classroom.



Instructor Units Lecture
S. Sandage 9 TR 9:00-10:20

This course takes a cultural approach to U.S. history since the Civil War, as seen by the nation's most astute and influential critics: its political humorists. Besides immortals like Mark Twain and contemporaries like Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert, we will (re)discover the satirical yet hilarious voices of H.L. Mencken, Will Rogers, Lenny Bruce, Dick Gregory, Richard Pryor, Nora Ephron, Dave Chapelle, and others through essays, recordings and films. At its sharpest edges, humor addresses issues of class, gender and race in American life, and provokes alternative thinking about mass culture, consumerism, and conformity. Assignments include short analytical essays and a final paper.



Instructor Units Lecture
A. Creasman 9 TH 1:30-2:50

This course examines the origins of Christianity in historical perspective. Using both Christian and non-Christian sources from the period, we will examine how and why Christianity assumed the form that it did by analyzing its background in the Jewish community of Palestine, its place in the classical world, and its relationship to other religious and philosophical traditions of the time. We will also examine historically how the earliest Christians understood the life and message of Jesus, the debates about belief and practice that arose among them, and the factors influencing the extraordinary spread of the movement in its earliest centuries.

This course satisfies one of the elective requirements for the Religious Studies minor.



Instructor Units Lecture
J. Gilchrist 6 MW 10:30-11:50

Scandal, conspiracy, and partisan propaganda have been among the stuff of media ever since newspapers first appeared in America 200+ years ago, and now they figure prominently in electronic media as well. The question "What is truth?" is not just a matter of philosophical speculation, but an essential issue at every level of American life, from individuals on social media to citizens, journalists, and politicians responsible for sustaining a democratic society.

This course is literally "ripped from the headlines," examining contemporary conflicts over credibility in print and online, in the context of historical experience. My goal is to help you think in new ways about how to assess - in both past and present -- when news really is "fake" and when it's just "an inconvenient truth".



Instructor Units Lecture
G. Tibon 6 TR 3:00-4:20

The Nazis demarcated more than 800 ghettos for interning the Jewish population of the territory they occupied during WWII. Some ghettos lasted for only a short period before they were destroyed; some lasted for years. Most were placed in towns or cities, but others were in rural areas. Some were designed as labor camps, and in a few, families and communities did manage to survive the war. Our course will focus on the East European ghettos, examining how they emerged, their function in the Nazi system, and their development from areas of spatial segregation to killing zones aimed at the annihilation of the people they contained. The course will examine Jewish life within the ghettos, social and cultural gaps, the Judenrat (Jewish councils appointed by the Nazis), and Jewish alternative leadership. We will also look at the uprising within the Warsaw ghetto, which resulted in its total destruction. By analyzing the development of the Ghetto as an urban disaster zone, we will seek to comprehend changes in the concept of ghettos by their inhabitants and by the oppressors. Using a case study approach, we will focus on the Warsaw Ghetto as a blockade within the surrounding city, the Lodz Ghetto as labor camp, the Mogilev and Zhmerinka ghettos (which remained relatively open under Romanian occupation but were part of a program of ethnic cleansing), and the ghettos in Vilnius and Bialystok, each of which raised horrific dilemmas of leadership among the imprisoned Jewish population.



Instructor Units Lecture
N. Theriault 6 MW 12:00-1:20

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, Neil Smith famously observed that “there is no such thing as a natural disaster.” This course takes a cue from Smith by examining the social production of disasters in the past and present, from acute environmental events like typhoons and earthquakes to disasters of “slow violence” like chronic exposure to toxic pollution and food insecurity. Examining case studies from around the world, we will explore how these different forms of disaster collide with inequalities of race, class, and gender – and in the process challenge us to rethink the relationship between nature and society.



Instructor Units Lecture
J. Trotter 9 TR 9:00-10:20

Popular perceptions of poor and working class people occupy a prominent place in discussions of today's African American urban community in the unfolding Age of Donald Trump. In the contemporary quest to build livable urban communities, however, journalistic, public policy, and academic analysts often discuss the black poor and working class as "consumers" rather than "producers," as "takers" rather than "givers," and as "liabilities" instead of "assets" in the present moment of the nation's history. Effective public policies, movement strategies, educational programs, media campaigns, and sensitive philanthropic decisions require deeper and more thoughtful perspectives on the history of urban race and class relations in the past. Focusing on the development of African American urban history from its colonial beginnings through today's "Black Lives Matter Movement," this course will emphasize the many ways that people of African descent shaped American and African American urban life through their roles as workers, community-builders, and social justice activists. In addition to weekly classroom discussions of assigned readings, students will write a series of short essays (based upon a mix of secondary and primary sources) on selected topics/themes in the development of African American urban life, culture, and politics.



Instructor Units Lecture
J. Soluri 9 MW 3:00-4:20

This course explores food production and consumption in the modern world. This semester, we will focus on ongoing debates over how to feed a world of seven billion people on a planet undergoing major climate change. We will explore the historical roots of the problem of "feeding the world" and consider the overlapping yet competing ideas of food security and food sovereignty. What are the cultural, economic, environmental and political contexts that create opportunities and constraints for changing food systems? After exploring this big question through readings and group discussions, the second half of the semester will be devoted to individual research projects focused on the historical and cultural dimensions of food provisioning.



Instructor Units Lecture
P. Eiss 9 MW 10:30-11:50

Observation, participation and direct experience of "the field" are hallmarks of anthropological ways of knowing, and their representation has played a foundational role in ethnographic writing both past and present. Yet reflexive and postmodernist explorations of these topics have triggered contentious debates over the nature of anthropology as a scientific or humanistic enterprise, and over its ethical, political and epistemological value. In this seminar, we will approach such questions through an exploration of the extremes of ethnographic fieldwork and writing. We will consider such topics as: the colonial history and politics of explorers and ethnographers; liminality and the place of extreme experience--such as cultural dislocation, violence, derangement, intoxication, sex, possession, and dreaming-in fieldwork and writing; field-notes as an ethnographic genre, and their relationship to "official" published ethnography; ethnographic surrealism and surrealist ethnography; the dimensions of sensory experience (visual, auditory, olfactory, etc.) in fieldwork and ethnography; collecting and the powers of "exotic" objects; inter-subjectivity and its implications; and experimentation with alternate ethnographic forms, such as autobiography, film, diary, and poetry.



Instructor Units Lecture
K. Allen 6 TR 12:00-1:20

Voter participation in free and fair elections is one of the most basic principles of the American republic, yet our country's history is fraught with examples of citizens fighting to exercise this right. From literacy tests to poll taxes, gerrymandered districts to controversial campaign financing rules, the federal and state governments have been called upon to establish protections for citizens and, when these protections fail, determine a remedy. This course will examine various key elements of voting and elections especially relevant to the current body politic, including campaign finance and gerrymandering.


Instructor Units Lecture
E. Fields-Black 9 TR 1:30-2:50

The trans-Atlantic slave trade dispersed Africans in the New World and the Old, creating the African Diaspora. Generations of scholars have disputed whether descendants of enslaved Africans could have retained any of their African culture and/ or fully assimilated into New World societies. This course will combine a chronological, geographical, and a thematic approach to the creation of new Africa-inspired cultures in both Africa and the African Diaspora. It will explore societies in the Caribbean, the US South, Latin America, and Africa and address themes, such as Africanisms, African survivals, African retentions, Creole languages, and religion.


Instructor Units Lecture
V. Keller 9 TR 6:30-7:50 pm

In this course we will look at fundamental changes in the approach of the United States to preparing for and engaging in armed conflict that have taken place since the War in Vietnam. The lowering of the voting age to eighteen and the end of conscription ("the Draft"), committed the United States to the challenge of continuing the Cold War and winning – there has been no acceptable alternative since the fall of Saigon post-Cold War conflicts with an all-volunteer military whose members were now enfranchised. At the same time, the U.S. defense establishment continued its pursuit of advanced technologies in all facets and at all levels of warfare, evolving through various regional interventions and culminating in the Gulf War, "Operation Desert Storm," in 1991. We will examine the continuing and increasing role of hi-tech in the chaotic decade after the collapse of the Warsaw Pact and in the American-led "War on Terror" since 9/11, waged by a much smaller, highly professionalized military, and we will engage some ethical and social issues about the American Way of War in the recent past and the citizens who practice it.


Instructor Units Lecture A Lecture B
N. Kats 9 M 6:30-9:20 pm R 6:30-9:20 pm

This course will examine the arts in Pittsburgh, both historically and in the present. We will focus especially on art exhibits and musical events scheduled by the city's museums and concert halls during the semester. The "curriculum" will derive from the artistic presentations themselves, which will provide a springboard for reading assignments, seminar discussions, and research papers in the history of music and art. We will also examine the historical development of cultural institutions in Pittsburgh. The History Department will pay for students' admission to all museums and studios. However, students will be charged a supplemental fee of a minimum of $275 to help subsidize the considerable expense of purchasing tickets for concerts and performances by the Pittsburgh Symphony, Pittsburgh Opera, Chamber Music Society, and Renaissance and Baroque Society. Attendance at all art exhibits and musical events is required. Prerequisite: Availability to attend art exhibits on several Fridays and Saturdays, and to attend musical events on several Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings.


Instructor Units Lecture
E. Grama Var. 6/12 MW 9:00-10:20

This research seminar is the capstone course for Global Studies majors. The course is designed to give you a chance to define and carry out a research project of personal interest. The first few weeks of the course will be devoted to developing a research topic and locating sources. We will then work on how to interpret and synthesize sources into a coherent and compelling thesis before you begin drafting your paper. Your research may be based on in-depth reading of a body of scholarly work, field notes from ethnographic observations, archival research, analysis of literary or visual media, or some combination of these sources. Incorporation of some non-English language sources is strongly encouraged where possible. Independent work, self-initiative, participation in discussion, and peer evaluations are required. There are several interim deadlines that will be strictly enforced in order to ensure successful completion of the course. Prerequisites: 79-275 and Theoretical and Topical Core must be complete or concurrently enrolled. Corequisite: 79-275.


Instructor Units Lecture
L. Z. Eisenberg 12 TR 3:00-4:20

The purpose of this research seminar is to help you conceptualize, design, organize, and execute a substantial research project that embodies and extends the knowledge and skill set you have been developing as a History major at Carnegie Mellon. The identification and collection of relevant primary source data, and the positioning of your project within a relevant historiography, are integral parts of this intellectual task.

449


Instructor Units Lecture
J. Tarr 12 TR 1:30-2:50

The Ethics, History and Public Policy Project Course is required for the Ethics, History and Public Policy major and is taken in the fall semester of the senior year. In this capstone course, Ethics, History and Public Policy majors carry out a collaborative research project that examines a compelling current policy issue that can be illuminated with historical research and philosophical and policy analysis for a chosen client. The students develop an original research report based on both archival and contemporary policy analysis and they present their results to their client and a review panel.


Instructor Units Lecture
J. Soluri Variable TBA

This course provides Global Studies majors with a chance to explore global connections in Pittsburgh. Majors, working in close consultation with the Global Studies director and advisor, will arrange an internship with a non-governmental organization (usually in Pittsburgh) whose mission has a global reach. This could include an organization that supports projects in other countries, works with immigrants in the Pittsburgh area, or participates in international policy making/governance. We strongly encourage students to seek out opportunities that require use of a second language. Students will be required to maintain a weekly journal; write a short critical reflection on how the internship connects to academic work; and share their experience with other Global Studies majors. Global Studies advisor and director will assist students with matching their interests to local organizations and identifying an on-site supervisor available to collaborate in the ongoing and final evaluation of the student's work. Prerequisite: Students must be Global Studies majors and obtain permission for the proposed internship from the Global Studies advisor.