Carnegie Mellon University

Publications by CHRS Affiliates

Annual Reviews

Reports

Books

Edited Volumes

  • Molly K. Land and Jay D. Aronson, New Technologies for Human Rights Law and Practice (Cambridge University Press, 2018).
  • Taylor B. Seybolt, Jay D. Aronson, and Baruch Fischhoff, Counting Civilian Casualties: An Introduction to Recording and Estimating Nonmilitary Deaths in Conflict (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Peer-reviewed journal articles

Peer-reviewed book chapters

  • Molly K. Land and Jay D. Aronson, “The Promise and Peril of Human Rights Technology,” in Molly K. Land and Jay D. Aronson, New Technologies for Human Rights Law and Practice (Cambridge University Press, 2018), pp. 1-20. Open Access PDF »
  • Jay D. Aronson, “The Utility of User-Generated Content in Human Rights Investigations,” in Molly K. Land and Jay D. Aronson, New Technologies for Human Rights Law and Practice (Cambridge University Press, 2018), pp. 129-148. Open Access PDF »
  • Enrique Piracés, “The Future of Human Rights Technology: A Practitioner’s View,” in Molly K. Land and Jay D. Aronson, New Technologies for Human Rights Law and Practice (Cambridge University Press, 2018), pp. 289-308. Open Access PDF »
  • Jay D. Aronson, “Mobile Phones, Social Media, and Big Data in Human Rights Fact Finding: Possibilities, Challenges, and Limitations,” in Philip Alston and Sarah Knuckey, The Transformation of Human Rights Fact-Finding (Oxford University Press, 2015), pp. 441-461.
  • Sarah Wagner, “The Quandaries of Partial and Commingled Remains: Srebrenica’s Missing and Korean War Casualties Compared,” in Francisco Ferrándiz and Antonius Robben, eds., Necropolitics: Mass Graves and Exhumations in the Age of Human Rights (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015).
  • Sarah Wagner, “The Social Complexities of Commingled Remains,” in Bradley J. Adams and John E. Byrd, eds., Commingled Human Remains: Methods in Recovery, Analysis and Identification (New York: Academic Press, 2014).
  • Taylor B. Seybolt, Jay D. Aronson, and Baruch Fischhoff, “Introduction,” in Taylor B. Seybolt, Jay D. Aronson, and Baruch Fischhoff, Counting Civilian Casualties: An Introduction to Recording and Estimating Nonmilitary Deaths in Conflict (Oxford University Press, 2013), pp. 3-13.
  • “The Politics of Civilian Casualty Counts,” in Taylor B. Seybolt, Jay D. Aronson, and Baruch Fischhoff, Counting Civilian Casualties: An Introduction to Recording and Estimating Nonmilitary Deaths in Conflict (Oxford University Press, 2013), pp. 29-50.
  • Jay D. Aronson, Baruch Fischhoff, and Taylor B. Seybolt, “Moving toward More Accurate Casualty Counts,” in Taylor B. Seybolt, Jay D. Aronson, and Baruch Fischhoff, Counting Civilian Casualties: An Introduction to Recording and Estimating Nonmilitary Deaths in Conflict (Oxford University Press, 2013), pp. 285-298.
  • Jay D. Aronson, “Humanitarian DNA Identification in Post-Apartheid South Africa,” in Keith Wailoo, et al. (eds), Genetics and the Unsettled Past (Rutgers University Press, 2012), pp. 295-312.
  • Sarah Wagner and Adam Rosenblatt, “Known Unknowns: DNA Identifications, the Nation-state, and the Iconic Dead,” in Chris Stojanowski and William Duncan, eds., Case Studies in Forensic Biohistory: Anthropological Perspectives (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2016).
  • Sarah Wagner (co-authored with Rifat Kešetović ), “‘Absent Bodies, Absent Knowledge: The Forensic Work of Identifying Srebrenica's Missing and the Social Experiences of Familes,”, in Derek Congram, ed., Missing Persons: Multidisciplinary Perspectives and Methods on Finding the Disappeared (Canadian Scholars Press, forthcoming 2016).

Special Issues

Op-Eds and other Commentary

Non-refereed publications

Human Rights Data Analysis Group Publications

  • For a complete database of publications by CHRS Research Fellows Patrick Ball and Megan Price, see the HRDAG website.