Carnegie Mellon University
Current CMU Collaborators

Susi Burger

Senior Scientist/Senior Data Collection Manager, InterACT Center

Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Susanne (Susi) Burger is a Senior Scientist/Senior Data Collection Manager at the InterACT Center, a collaboration between Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Karsruhe, Germany. Susi was previously a lecturer and research associate at the Department of Phonetics and Speech Communication, University of Munich from 1992-1998. She is primarily interested in phenomena of spontaneous and communicative speech. She has organized, collected and coordinated several monolingual, multilingual and multimodal speech databases for both national and international projects (including speeches at the European Parliament). She has developed standards for the transcription of spontaneous speech data and speech annotation tools and has evaluated various ASR systems. She is also known for her research in the field of spontaneous speech phenomena and pronunciation variants. Her studies include speaker behavior in multi-party conversations and the detection of emotion in spontaneous speech. More recently, Susi has turned her attention to multi-modal projects (i.e., media involving video, audio, text and speech). For the ALADDIN project, she developed a system to annotate audio background noise by adapting knowledge from speech fundamentals to noise signals, the “Noiseme” system. Susi received her MA in Phonetics, Psycholinguistics and Mediaevistics at the University of Munich, Germany in 1992.

William F. Eddy

John C. Warner Professor (Emeritus), Department of Statistics

Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Bill is the John C. Warner Professor of Statistics (Emeritus) at Carnegie Mellon University, and he also holds appointments in the departments of Biological Sciences and Machine Learning, the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, and the Center forCognitive Brain Imaging. Bill earned an A.B. degree in Statistics from Princeton University, and M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. degrees in Statistics from Yale University. Bill is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He has been designated a lifetime National Associate by the National Academy of Sciences. When he completed his second three-year term as chairman of the Committee on National Statistics in 2010, he became the only person to have chaired both statistics committees at the National Academies, having previously chaired the Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics. Bill has published over 100 research papers and authored or edited 20 books and monographs. While his early research was theoretical probability and statistics, he has focused in the last two decades on applied problems, most recently in brain imaging.

Baruch Fischoff

Howard Heinz University Professor, Social and Decision Sciences and Engineering and Public Policy

Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Baruch is the Howard Heinz University Professor in the departments of Social and Decision Sciences and of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University, where he heads the Decision Sciences major. A graduate of the Detroit Public Schools, he holds a BS in mathematics and psychology from Wayne State University and an MA and PhD in psychology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and currently chairs the National Research Council Committee on Behavioral and Social Science Research to Improve Intelligence Analysis for National Security. He also chairs the Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee. He is a member of the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Advisory Committee, the World Federation of Scientists Permanent Monitoring Panel on Terrorism, and the Department of State Global Expertise Program. He is past President of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making and of the Society for Risk Analysis, and recipient of its Distinguished Achievement Award. He was a member of the Eugene, Oregon Commission on the Rights of Women and the Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board, where he chaired the Homeland Security Advisory Committee. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science (previously the American Psychological Society), and the Society for Risk Analysis. He has co-authored or edited four books, Acceptable Risk (1981), A Two-State Solution in the Middle East: Prospects and Possibilities (1993), Elicitation of Preferences (2000), and Risk Communication: A Mental Models Approach (2002).

Alex Hauptmann

Principal Systems Scientist, School of Computer Science

Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Alex is a Principal Systems Scientist in Carnegie Mellon University’s Computer Science Department and a faculty member within the Language Technologies Institute. His received a B.A. and M.A. in Psychology from Johns Hopkins University, a Diplom in Informatics from the Technische Universitaet Berlin, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon. His research interests have led him to pursue and combine several different areas: video analysis, man-machine communication, natural language processing, speech understanding and synthesis, and machine learning. He worked on speech and machine translation at CMU before he joined the Informedia project where he developed the News-on-Demand video analysis system. Since then he has conducted research projects on video analysis and understanding creator perspectives in multimedia. The success of his work on multimedia retrieval on observational (surveillance) and Internet video is supported by consistently outstanding performance in the annual NIST TRECVID video analysis and large scale video event detection evaluations.

Alex John London

Associate Professor and Director, Center for Ethics and Policy, Department of Philosophy

  • 135 Baker Hall
  • 412-268-4938
Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Alex is Associate Professor of Philosophy and has directed the Center for Ethics and Policy since 2007. He has written extensively on ethical issues in the conduct of research involving human subjects, including international research. He is particularly interested in problems relating to uncertainty, risk, fairness, equality and justice. He also works on methodological issues in both theoretical and applied ethics.  In 2006 Alex received the Distinguished Service Award from the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities and in 2005 he was awarded a New Directions Fellowship from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. He has been commissioned to write papers for the Institute of Medicine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and for a national study group that explored ethical issues involved in innovative surgical practices. He is curently a member of the Ethics Working Group of the HIV Prevention Trials Netword where he serves as liaison to vaginal health protocols.  Co-editor of one of the most respected and widely used textbooks in bioethics, Alex has authored more than 30 papers and book chapters in bioethics.

Daniel B. Neill

Assistant Professor of Information Systems and Director, Event and Pattern Detection Laboratory, Heinz College and School of Computer Science

Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Daniel is Assistant Professor of Information Systems at the H.J. Heinz III College of Carnegie Mellon University (School of Public Policy and Management, and School of Information Systems and Management). He holds courtesy appointments in the Machine Learning Department and Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon, and is an adjunct professor in the University of Pittsburgh's Department of Biomedical Informatics. He received his M.Phil. in Computer Speech from Cambridge University in 2002, his M.S. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon in 2004, and his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon in 2006. Prof. Neill is the author of more than thirty publications on the topic of event and pattern detection, and is the director of the recently established Event and Pattern Detection Laboratory at CMU. He has also published in a variety of other fields including game theory, evolutionary biology, natural language processing, health care information systems, and cancer biology. Detection methods developed by Prof. Neill and colleagues have been incorporated into deployed disease surveillance systems in the U.S., Canada, India, and Sri Lanka, and his CrimeScan software is in day-to-day operational use by the Chicago Police Department in order to predict and prevent emerging hot-spots of violent crime. He has also developed a new curriculum in Machine Learning and Policy at CMU, creating several new graduate courses and establishing the world's first Ph.D. program in Machine Learning and Policy. Prof. Neill is the recipient of an NSF CAREER award (2010) and NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (2002-2005), and received the Best Research Presentation award at the 2005 National Syndromic Surveillance Conference.

Roni Rosenfeld

Professor, School of Computer Science

  • 8106 Gates Hillman Complex
  • 412-268-7678
Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Roni is Professor of Language Technologies, Machine Learning and Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University.  His research interests include Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D), and specifically Spoken Language Technologies for Development (SLT4D): finding ways to use speech recognition and automated dialog systems to aid socio-economic development around the world. Current projects investigate telephone-based information access and information entry by low-literate community health workers in Pakistan, and automated public health surveillance in local languages around the world.  Prof. Rosenfeld received a B.Sc. in Mathematics and Physics from Tel-Aviv University, and a M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University.  He is a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellow, and a recipient of the Allen Newell Medal for Research Excellence.

Taylor Seybolt

Assistant Professor and Director, Ford Institute for Human Security, University of Pittsurgh Graduate School of Public and International Affairs

  • 3937 Posvar Hall, University of Pittsburgh
  • 412-624-7918
Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Taylor is the Director of the Ford Institute for Human Security and an Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh.  He was a senior program officer at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) in Washington, DC, from 2002 to 2008.  During his years in Washington, he was a Professorial Lecturer at the Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies and an Adjunct Professor in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University. From 1999 to 2002, he was Leader of the Conflicts and Peace Enforcement Project at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) in Sweden.  Seybolt is the author of Humanitarian Military Intervention: the Conditions for Success and Failure (Oxford, 2007). He was an advisor to the Genocide Prevention Task Force, co-chaired by Madeleine Albright and William Cohen. He has received grants and fellowships from the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, the MacArthur Foundation and USIP.  Seybolt holds a PhD in political science from MIT.

Yaser Sheikh

Associate Professor, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University

  • EDSH 221 (Smith Hall)
  • 412-268-1138
Address
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Bio

Yaser Sheikh is an Associate Professor at the Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, with appointments in the Mechanical Engineering Department and the Quality of Life Technology Center. He also conducts research on virtual social networking for Facebook/Oculus VR. Yaser received his Ph.D. in 2006 from the University of Central Florida. His research interests span computer vision, computer graphics, and robotics, and are focused on the machine perception of social behavior. He has won the Honda Initiation Award (2010), the Hillman Fellowship for Excellence in Computer Science Research (2004), and awards for best paper at numerous conferences. He has over 50 publications in leading conferences in computer vision, computer graphics, and machine learning, and holds four patents on his research. Yaser has served as a senior committee member at leading conferences in computer vision, computer graphics, and robotics. His research is sponsored by various government research offices, including NSF and DARPA, and several industrial partners including the Intel Corporation, the Walt Disney Company, Nissan, Honda, and the Samsung Group. His research has been covered by various media outlets including BBC, MSNBC, New Scientist, slashdot, and WIRED.