Carnegie Mellon University

Nominate an Educator

Thank you for your interest in learning more about the nomination process for the University Education Awards. Before you begin preparation for nominating an educator, please review the award criteria and eligibility. Also, please keep in mind that selected text from the nomination letter/package may be quoted in event publicity and ceremony recognition.

Doherty Award for Sustained Contributions to Excellence in Education
Carnegie Mellon established the Robert E. Doherty Award to recognize a member of the university community who has made substantial and sustained contributions to excellence in education. The Doherty Award is intended to recognize contributions to the development, implementation and evaluation of educational programs at all levels, and to the creation and maintenance of an environment that fosters excellence in education.

Examples of activities to be considered include but are not limited to:

  • developing innovative educational programs for undergraduate, graduate or special students
  • creating and implementing programs, services or systems to nurture and sustain students, faculty or staff to achieve their full educational potential
  • creating or incorporating program elements that address diverse students' needs
  • developing widely used curriculum material such as text books and educational software
  • establishing educational programs that bridge the university and the community

The Doherty Award is not a teaching award; it goes beyond teaching one's own courses to developing educational programs, broadly used educational materials, etc.

Doherty Award Nomination Instructions

Ryan Award for Meritorious Teaching
Carnegie Mellon's William H. and Frances S. Ryan Award for Meritorious Teaching is given annually to a full-time faculty member at the university who has demonstrated unusual devotion and effectiveness in teaching undergraduate or graduate students.

The award is intended to recognize excellence in teaching in several dimensions:

  • outstanding classroom teaching
  • creation of challenging and innovative courses
  • creation or use of new and innovative teaching methods and course materials
  • effective supervision of research or creative projects
  • effective supervision of undergraduate honors students and graduate students
  • creation or use of inclusive teaching practices that support all students

Ryan Award Nomination Instructions

Teaching Innovation Award
Introduced in 2016, the Teaching Innovation Award is Carnegie Mellon's newest faculty recognition. The award honors teaching practices or strategies designed to improve student learning in online, blended or face-to-face courses. Individual faculty members and/or teams of colleagues may be recognized.

The award is intended to recognize and disseminate teaching practices based on:

  • originality of the teaching strategy or how it was implemented
  • impact on student learning and/or engagement
  • potential to adopt the teaching strategy (or key elements thereof) within or across disciplines

Teaching Innovation Award Nomination Instructions

Graduate Student Teaching Award
Given annually to a graduate student who has demonstrated teaching excellence at the undergraduate and/or graduate level at the university. The award is intended to foster a culture of teaching excellence among graduate teaching assistants and instructors.

Examples of teaching excellence can include but are not limited to:

  • outstanding teaching in the classroom, laboratory or studio
  • creation or use of new and innovative teaching methods and course materials
  • effectiveness in feedback, review sessions or one-on-one instruction
  • creation of challenging and innovative courses
  • creation or use of inclusive teaching practices that support all students

Graduate Student Teaching Award Nomination Instructions

Award for Outstanding Contributions to Academic Advising and Mentoring
The Academic Advising Award was established to recognize members of the Carnegie Mellon community who have achieved excellence in advising undergraduate students. The award is intended to honor outstanding contributions in helping students to define and achieve their academic goals.

Examples of activities to be considered include but are not limited to:

  • advising on course selection
  • research focus and management
  • choice of major/minor
  • long-term career goals
  • personal development

Academic Advising Award Nomination Instructions

Lazarus Award for Graduate Student and Junior Faculty Mentoring
The Barbara Lazarus Award recognizes exemplary contributions to fostering a welcoming and nurturing environment for graduate students and young faculty at Carnegie Mellon.

Carnegie Mellon created the Barbara Lazarus Award in 2004 to celebrate the spirit and legacy of Barbara Lazarus. Associate provost for academic affairs, teacher, scholar and mentor to many, Barbara was a beloved member of the CMU community from 1984 to 2003. A nationally and internationally known scholar and activist, Barbara worked tirelessly for the equality of women in the workplace, and the well-being and flourishing of graduate students and junior faculty at Carnegie Mellon. Barbara educated many on transforming the institutional environment by her words and by her example. An innovator in education, Barbara also founded Carnegie Mellon’s outstanding Undergraduate Research Program. Equity, justice and fostering both a climate of welcome and the flourishing of all the people with whom she worked were hallmarks of Barbara’s work and life. She was especially an advocate for graduate students and young faculty.

Lazarus Award Nomination Instructions

Gelfand Service Award for Educational Outreach
The Mark Gelfand Award for Educational Outreach is given annually to a member of the university community who has combined sustained, effective community service with academic coursework and a deliberate process of student reflection to enhance the learning experience, teach social responsibility and improve some aspect of life in the community. Special consideration is given to individuals who focus on science, technology, engineering or mathematics educational outreach to younger populations.

Examples of activities to be considered include but are not limited to:

  • developing or strengthening courses or other programs that require students to share expertise with the community while they develop their own content and skill knowledge in a subject area
  • maintaining a consistent focus on relationships with pre-college populations through teacher professional development programs or direct programming for student populations to improve teaching and learning at the K-12 level
  • creating a program or other support system that enables service learning courses to expand or achieve a more effective impact in the community

Gelfand Award Nomination Instructions

Graduate Student Service Award
Carnegie Mellon’s Graduate Student Service Award is given annually to a graduate student who has advanced the interests of fellow graduate students, improved their quality of life on campus and/or contributed to the larger academic community.

Examples of service commitment can include but are not limited to:

  • evidence of leadership on university, department or graduate student committees
  • leadership in student organizations or activities supporting current graduate student interests on campus or in the community
  • support of current graduate student interests on campus or in the community
  • development and/or activity with service programs
  • service with local or national organizations representing Carnegie Mellon graduate students
  • service with local or national organizations advancing graduate student interests
  • activities advancing an inclusive climate and culture

Graduate Student Service Award Nomination Instructions