Carnegie Mellon University
September 10, 2015

Consolazio Awarded Third Place in Trinidad and Tobago National Competition

Consolazio Awarded Third Place in Trinidad and Tobago National Competition Consolazio Awarded Third Place in Trinidad and Tobago National Competition PhD Student Nizette Consolazio, and her advisor Associate Research Professor Athanasios Karamalidis were recently awarded third place in the Scientific Creative Solutions Competition in the Prime Minister's Awards for Scientific Ingenuity in Trinidad and Tobago.

In their entry, The Fate of Biocides in Produced Water, Consolazio tackles the need to understand the fate of chemical additives used for the extraction of oil and natural gas. Models currently used by the industry assume that these compounds do not react with the lithophacies of the oil and natural gas formations, or that the reactions are the same as those observed at ambient conditions. Instead, the team proposed a process to determine the chemical reactions between additives and formation minerals for a specific drilling site. Their proposed process predicts whether chemical additives and their reaction products may contaminate air, water or sediment.

In its 15th year, the Prime Minister's Awards for Scientific Ingenuity recognizes outstanding accomplishments in science and technology focused on innovative and creative solutions to commonplace issues facing the people of Trinidad and Tobago. Consolazio, a citizen of Trinidad, studies the fate of hydraulic fracturing fluid additives in the Marcellus Shale, and is co-advised by CEE Professors Karamalidis and Greg Lowry.