Graduate Students Hack To Another Win at AngelHack-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Graduate Students Hack To Another Win at AngelHack

Carnegie Mellon University’s Silicon Valley (CMU-SV) students love to hack, so it was no wonder they spent yet another weekend participating in a hackathon rather than indulging in some R&R. On June 15-16, a team of CMU-SV students hacked their way to two API prizes at AngelHack Silicon Valley. AngelHack, “the world’s biggest hackathon competition,” organizes hackathons in cities all over the world from London to Singapore, and last weekend’s San Jose, Ca. event brought in close to 1000 submissions.

The team of Software Engineering graduate students, Owen Chu, Clyde Li, Kate Liu, David Liu, Sean Xiao, and Ph.D. student, Yuan Tian, impressed the judges with their app, Sticky. “The idea behind Sticky is to connect the consumers and the companies by creating an ecosystem in which both sides can benefit,” said Owen Chu. Companies host competitions using their products through the Sticky site, attracting users to vote on their favorite products and receive coupons from the company. The companies then receive demographic information on their voters. “This anonymous user information is valuable in helping companies understand the market and make more informed strategic decisions,” explained Chu.

The team won sponsor prizes from HP and Intel, adding to their considerable hackathon spoils from recent wins at the Tizen Hack Competition, Hertz Hackathon and CMU-SV HTML5 Hackathon, to name a few. Team members contend that Sticky is their favorite idea yet and are exploring growth options such as finding local businesses to host competitions on their site. “The hackathon judges told us that they graded the business side of apps most heavily and that our idea is actually marketable,” said Software Engineering ’13 student, David Liu. “We think we could make a business out of this.”

Pictured above (from left): Sean Xiao, Yuan Tian, David Liu, Kate Liu, Owen Chu, and Clyde Li