Program-Silicon Valley Campus - Carnegie Mellon University

Index

News, Photos & Videos
Program Summary and Schedule
     Sunday
     Monday
Program Element Highlights
Goals of Workshop

The workshop is now over. We are posting slides, photos and notes on this page.


News, Photos & Videos

DMI Workshop Photo Slideshow:



Sunday, November 4, 2012

Registration starts at 12.30pm

Time
Track A
Track B
 1.00- 1.30
Welcome
Opening Remarks re: Resilient Data, Communities, Agencies
Martin Griss, CMU-SV
slides

 1.30- 2.30

Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) and Commercial Mobile Alerting System (CMAS)

Art Botterell, Aristide Niyungeko, & Siva Visakan Sooriyan; CMU-SV; & Sholom Cohen, SEI
Room 118
slides1, slides2, slides3

Mobile Tools for Emergency Responders

Mike Prince, Citizen 911 & Steven Rosenberg, CMU-SV
Room 109/110
slides1, slides2

 2.30- 2.45
Break
Room 129/Open Space
 2.45- 3.15
Community/Agency Interoperability Event: Introduction
Bob Iannucci, CMU-SV & team
Room 109/110
slides
 3.15- 4.45
Community/Agency Interoperability Event: Exercise
Bob Iannucci, CMU-SV & team
Room 109/110
 4.45- 5.30
Safer Cities, Smarter Cities
Bruce Mueller, Motorola Solutions
Room 109/110
slides
 5.30- 6.30
Reception
Room 129/Open Space


Monday, November 5, 2012

Registration starts at 8am

Time
Track A
Track B
8.30-9.00
Breakfast & Welcoming Remarks
Martin Griss, CMU-SV
Room 129/Open Space
slides
9.00-10.00

Keynote

Prepare Silicon Valley, Empowering People to Become Resilient

Barbara Larkin (CEO) & Patti Fry (Chair, Prepare Silicon Valley),

American Red Cross (Silicon Valley Chapter)

Room 109/110
slides

10.00-10.30
Break
Room 129/Open Space
10.30-11.30

Common Operating Picture Platform - 2012 Report

David Coggeshall, DMI/GGSN  &
Trey Smith, CMU-SV

Room 109
slides1 (big!), slides2

Emergency Vehicle PlugFest: Preparation and Launch

Steve Ray, CMU-SV & team

Room 110
slides

11.30-12.00

Mesh and Delay Tolerant Networking for Disaster Communication

Patrick Tague, CMU-SV

Room 109
slides

12.00- 1.00
Lunch
Room 129/Open Space
  1.00- 2.00

Michael Cummings, FEMA; Brandon Bond, Stanford; Jim Turner, San Francisco DEM

Room 109/110

(no slides)

  2.00-2.40
How SSN was used in the Sunday event

Jona Cali, Ryan Caney, Stu Kennedy & Bob Iannucci; CMU-SV

Room 109/110
slides


Emergency Vehicle PlugFest: Data Collection

Steve Ray, CMU-SV & team

Back Parking Lot

  2.40-3.00

A National Vision for an Interoperable Response & Preparedness Platform (IRAPP)

Steve Scott, Mutualink

Room 109/110
slides

  3.00-3.30
Break
  3.30-4.00

Meeting the Interoperability Challenge

David Witkowski, Anritsu
Room 118
slides

Emergency Vehicle PlugFest: Debrief
Steve Ray, CMU-SV & team
Room 109/110
slides

  4.00-4.30

Mobile Medical Emergency Services (MEMS) Application: Class Project

Edward Akoto, Sumeet Kumar, Oscar Sandoval, & Cecile Peraire, CMU-SV; Sean Lanthier, EMT

Room 109/110
slides

  4.30-5.00

MCIP: Overview and Opportunities

Scott L Griffin, PACOM J16
MCIP Technical Director

Room 118
slides

North Counties Alliance
Brad Wardle, MV Fire, Ken Dueker, PA OES & Scott Vermeer, MV Police
Room 109/110
slides
  5.00-5.30
Wrap Up
Martin Griss, CMU-SV
Room 109/110


Program Element Highlights

Key projects that will be discussed and showcased include:

Advanced Incident Communications Lab

In partnership with NASA and Silicon Valley public safety agencies, the DMI is building an advanced incident communications laboratory (AICL) for experiments in mobile crisis management, advanced emergency communications networks, sustainable energy systems, and "smart spaces" for temporary and expedient workspaces. This includes efficient computer controlled LED lighting, the careful design of collaborative workspaces, the wireless sensors and controllers, and the internal and external voice and data links.This lab expands on the ongoing Mobile EOC project and relates to the new Smart Communities program in the Mobility Research Center.

Common Alerting Protocol (CAP)

The Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) defines a well-structured XML format message that can be created and delivered by a large variety of organizations, tools and systems, such as CMAS (WAE), NOAA, and IPAWS and to a variety of (mobile) devices. However, many emergency message originators are not producing well formed CAP messages, and this complicates the reformatting and delivery of the message to the right recipients and devices in the right location. We are working to create an open source, simple to use cloud-based tool to create alerts consistent with CAP without needing to know how to code.

Common Operating Picture Platform

The CMUSV's DMI and Golden Gate Safety Network program strives to define a baseline data architecture for simple information sharing between Public Safety Agencies and the civilian sector. The major emphasis is on CIKR (Critical Infrastructure & Key Resources) for setting Damage Assessment Status, and GPS location of the closest Emergency Resource (Fire, Law, Medical, etc.). The Common Operating Picture Platform (COPP) attempts to build a Reference Implementation as a freely available starting template for integrating the many open source software components now available from the Federal and State support agencies. Recognizing the emerging standards (such as EDXL, NIEM, OPEN, OGC, COBIE, etc.), GGSN provides a data preparation roadmap for small to medium agencies to follow, in order to prepare their emergency data for information exchange in a mutual aid event.

Supporting agencies include the San Jose Water Company, the Menlo Park Fire Protection District, and the Marin County Fire Chiefs Association. Talks are underway with additional municipalities and Counties to develop a regional "Best Practice" for Emergency Information Sharing.

Community/Agency Interoperability Event

A key component of the workshops will be a demonstration of the interoperability of a variety of information categories and exchange mechanisms. Items such as photos, streaming video, dispatch and status updates, maps and geolocated data will be exchanged using resilient web servers, databases and stand-alone PBX telephone networks. All of the demonstrated approaches are designed keeping in mind the possibility of downed electrical grids, telephone exchanges and cell towers. The demonstration will involve several mobile command vehicles, facilities at CMU, and a variety of mobile devices designed for easy use by the general population.

The demonstration is supported by a systematic evaluation of information exchange and network connectivity capabilities in the form of an Interoperability Maturity Model that will form the basis of the interoperability “Plugfest” described earlier. Participants will have the opportunity to evaluate their own capabilities by completing a questionnaire and exercise, thereby populating the model with their own information. A completed model will give detailed insight into the strengths and weaknesses of their data communications system.

Emergency Vehicle Plugfest

The Plugfest will focus on some quantifiable measures of interoperability among mobile command and communciation vehicles, at both the communication layers (radio frequencies, mesh networks…) and the content layer (message protocols and formats, semantic content for identified kinds of data sharing scenarios). This will be based on some work at CMUSV defining an Interoperability Maturity Model (IMM) that we hope will help stakeholders measure where they stand in the spectrum of full interoperability along a number of dimensions, and suggest key areas for improvement. These measures could in turn help users advocate internally for support to improve their capabilities, and it provides valuable data for the CMUSV's DMI research program.

Semantic Geotagging

The semantic geotagging project has made substantial progress since 2011, and has been integrated with the hyperwall-based version of the common operating picture (COP), with a refined forms-based interface on the smart phone and the command center map-based common operating picture, to provide two-way situation-aware communciation and coordination.  This system will be demonstrated and the workshop used to gather new requirements and proposed refinements. Among other enhancements, imaging capability to pass relevant pictures and video through from smart phones to the COPP has been added, along with location tracking of responders.

Survivable Social Networks (SSN)

As a direct consequence of the Loma Prieta earthquake in 1989, 154 of 160 telephone central offices in Northern California lost primary power - and some even lost backup power.  Today's voice and data networks are even more susceptible to disruption caused by power outages. Smaller incidents, such as the San Bruno fire, also severely impacted cell phone communications. Since that time, our society has only become more dependent on communications infrastructure, and that infrastructure has become, arguably, less robust.  Also since that time, we've witnessed the emergence of social networking tools, fueled by broadly available internet service.  We have seen how social networks have been useful in emergency situations.  But when the underlying communications infrastructure fails, how will social networks help?

The SSN project  is developing a system that can be deployed in and by neighborhoods to provide flexible and powerful social networking tools, accessible via smartphones, without dependence on public telecommunications or Internet infrastructures.  SSN offers the promise of a familiar-feeling, easily used, training-less system for disseminating information in the midst of a disaster to and between community members, augmenting existing tools and systems that will be available to relief agencies. This will be key part of a larger Silicon Valley Resilient Network project.