More Public Access Policies-Scholarly Communications - Carnegie Mellon University

More Public Access Policies

As of January 17, 2014, the United States federal government has a new set of open access mandates adopted as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014. Similar to the NIH public access policy, the Act directs affected agencies to develop public access policies that require:

  • Submission to the agency, or a designated entity acting on behalf of the agency, of a machine-readable version of the author's final peer-reviewed manuscript describing research supported by federal funding 
  • Free online public access to the final peer-reviewed manuscript or published version in a trusted repository no later than 12 months after publication
  • Compliance will U.S. copyright law

The agencies affected by the public access provision in the Appropriations Act include:

  • Department of Labor
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Health and Human Services (including the National Institutes of Health, Food and Drug Administration, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

In addition, research universities and other institutions worldwide are increasingly adopting a public access mandate or open access policy.  For example, the Microsoft Research Open Access Policy was announced in January 2014.  For a fairly comprehensive list of institutional mandates, see the Registry of Open Access Repositories Mandatory Archiving Policies (ROARMAP). 

Compared to the OSTP directive

The Appropriations Act of 2014
  • Does not apply to data
  • Does not require re-use rights or open licenses
  • Applies for just one fiscal year
  • Applies to fewer agencies
  • Is enacted legislation

Compared to FASTR

The Appropriations Act of 2014
  • Has a longer embargo period (12 months compared to 6 months)
  • Does not apply to data
  • Does not require re-use rights or open licenses
  • Applies for just one fiscal year
  • Applies to fewer agencies
  • Is enacted legislation