2012-BrainHub - Carnegie Mellon University

2012 News

Synchrony & Autism
National Public Radio
June 4, 2012

Carnegie Mellon University's Marcel Just discusses his research that provides an explanation for some of autism's mysteries — from social and communication disorders to restricted interests — and gives scientists clear targets for developing intervention and treatment therapies. Just's discovery of a lack of synchrony in the autistic brain gives scientists hope for finding a solution for autism. Read more »

Valence Perception
Carnegie Mellon University
May 23, 2012

When grabbing a mug out of a cabinet or quickly choosing a pen, what brain processes guide your choices? New research from CMU's Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC), recently published in "Frontiers in Psychology," shows that the brain's visual perception system automatically and unconsciously guides decision-making through what is known as valence perception. Read more »

Genetics and Autism
Carnegie Mellon University
April 4, 2012

Published in "Nature," a series of studies by researchers, including Carnegie Mellon University's Kathryn Roeder and the University of Pittsburgh's Bernie Devlin, suggests that autism spectrum disorders are caused by variations in multiple unrelated locations within the genome. These findings provide a basis for future gene discovery, diagnostics and therapeutics. Read more »

Unlocking Autism's Mysteries
Carnegie Mellon University
March 6, 2012

New research from Carnegie Mellon University's Marcel Just, recently published in the journal "Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews," provides an explanation for some of autism's mysteries — from social and communication disorders to restricted interests — and gives scientists clear targets for developing intervention and treatment therapies. Read more »

Illusion of Courage
Carnegie Mellon University
January 17, 2012

We plan to take risks, then we "chicken out." In a new paper in the "Journal of Behavioral Decision Making," Carnegie Mellon University and University of Colorado Boulder scientists argue that this "illusion of courage" is one example of an "empathy gap" — our inability to imagine how we will behave in future emotional situations. Read more »