university sealEditor's notes:

POLICY TITLE: Carnegie Mellon University Drug and Alcohol Brochure (including policies)

DATE OF ISSUANCE: This brochure is distributed to the campus community each academic year.

ACCOUNTABLE DEPARTMENT/UNIT: Office of the Dean of Student Affairs. Questions regarding students should be directed to the dean, Office of Student Affairs, ext. 8-2075. Questions regarding employees should be directed to the associate vice president for human resources, ext. 8-1243. For questions regarding alcohol at social events, contact the Office of the General Counsel, ext. 8-3747.

ABSTRACT: Unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol by students or employees on Carnegie Mellon University property or as part of any of its activities is prohibited.

The social host policy governs all university social activities on and off campus at which alcoholic beverages will be served.

MISC: See also:


 

NOTE:  The Alcohol and Drug Policy will soon be under review. In anticipation of that review, slight clarifications have been posted to the policy to provide the appropriate legal reference point pursuant to Carnegie Mellon University’s presence in multiple locations. Clarifications have been highlighted in red.


Alcohol and Drugs

Standards of Conduct

Possession and use of illicit drugs and the unlawful possession and use of alcohol are wrong and harmful. Unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol by students or employees on Carnegie Mellon University property or as part of any of its activities is prohibited. Compliance with the following standards of conduct is mandatory.

Standards of Conduct Regarding Illegal Drugs

The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession or use of illicit drugs is prohibited at Carnegie Mellon University. The following policies apply to the Carnegie Mellon community:

Carnegie Mellon Student Policy on Illegal Drugs

The university cannot deny access to its property to properly constituted law enforcement agents. Therefore, activity involving the unlawful use or sale of drugs by one student may also, by bringing law enforcement agents to the campus, risk compromising the privacy of the academic community. With the legal and medical welfare of the student in mind, the university cannot approve the medically unsupervised use, possession or distribution of drugs. When such medically unsupervised use, possession or distribution of drugs comes to the attention of the university, the student will be subject to disciplinary action which could include suspension or expulsion.

In any instance where a violation of the laws concerning drugs occurs on the Carnegie Mellon campus or in connection with the activities of Carnegie Mellon's students, the disciplinary policy of the university will permit taking action beyond or separate from any which may be taken by civil authorities.

Campus police officers at Carnegie Mellon’s Pittsburgh campus must follow Pennsylvania rules of Criminal Procedure and Rules of Evidence when discovering illegal drugs on campus, and then take appropriate legal action.

The medically unsupervised possession, use or distribution of potentially harmful drugs such as marijuana, hallucinogens, amphetamines, barbiturates and opiates is illegal and subject to very harsh penalties. Although the university does not assume the responsibility of acting as an arm of the law, members of the academic community have no immunity from enforcement of the law. Use of many of these drugs may threaten the physical and mental health of the user. Use by one student may also threaten the welfare of other students. Distribution by any student clearly threatens the welfare of the academic community.

Prolonged, excessive drinking can shorten life span 10-12 years.

Carnegie Mellon Employee Policy on Illegal Drugs

No employee shall report to work under the influence of drugs used in an unlawful manner. No employee shall unlawfully manufacture, distribute, dispense, possess or use drugs on Carnegie Mellon property, as part of any Carnegie Mellon activities or while on duty as a Carnegie Mellon employee. Any university employee who violates this policy is subject to disciplinary action including suspension and dismissal.

Pursuant to the laws of the United States and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (or applicable laws for other jurisdictions where Carnegie Mellon operates) and Carnegie Mellon policy, all Carnegie Mellon employees must notify both their immediate supervisor and the Office of the Provost no later than five days after any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring in the work place. Within 10 days of receiving actual notice of such a conviction, from the employee or otherwise, the university will notify the appropriate federal agency if an employee engaged in the performance of a federal contract or grant has been convicted of a criminal drug statute violation. Within 30 days of receiving such notice, the university will take appropriate disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal, or will require the employee to participate satisfactorily in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program.

All Carnegie Mellon employees are required to abide by this policy as a condition of their employment. Failure to comply with this policy and its notification may jeopardize continued research funding to the university and will be considered grounds for dismissal.

Questions concerning the interpretation or implementation of this policy should be directed to the associate vice president for human resources, extension 8-1243.

Employees note: It is also a violation of the conditions of employment at Carnegie Mellon to report for work under the influence of alcohol or engage in the consumption of alcohol that impairs performance. Failure to adhere to these rules can lead to disciplinary action taken against the offender, including suspension and dismissal.

Standards of Conduct Regarding Alcohol

Carnegie Mellon faculty, administrators, staff and students recognize the responsibility and potential harm inherent in the use of alcoholic beverages. The university is committed to supporting the laws of the United States and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (or applicable laws for other jurisdictions where Carnegie Mellon operates) and reflects that support in its policies and procedures.

The law of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania concerning the use of alcoholic beverages reads as follows:

Section 6308 (a): A person commits a summary offense if he/she, being less than 21 years of age, attempts to purchase, purchases, consumes, possesses or knowingly and intentionally transports any alcohol, liquor or malt or brewed beverages.

Violation:

  • Maximum penalty for first offense: $500 fine; 90 days imprisonment.
  • Maximum penalty for subsequent offenses: $1,000 fine; 90 days imprisonment. 
  • Police required to notify parents.
  • Immediate suspension of operator's license. First offense: 90-day suspension. Second offense: one-year suspension. Subsequent offenses: two-year suspension.

Section 6309 (a): A person is guilty of a misdemeanor of the third degree if he/she knowingly, willfully, and falsely represents to any licensed dealer or other person, any minor to be of full age, for the purpose of inducing any such licensed dealer or other person, to sell or furnish any liquor or malt or brewed beverages to a minor.

Violation:

  • Maximum penalty: one year imprisonment.
  • Minimum penalty: $300 fine.

Section 6310.1 (a): A person commits a misdemeanor of the third degree if he/she intentionally and knowingly sells or intentionally and knowingly furnishes, or purchases with the intent to sell or furnish, any liquor or malt or brewed beverage to a person who is less than 21 years of age.

Violation:

  • Maximum penalty: one year imprisonment.
  • Minimum penalty: $1,000 fine for first violation; $2,500 fine for subsequent violations.

Section 6310.6: Definitions: "Furnish" to supply, give or provide to or allow a minor to possess on premises or property owned or controlled by the person charged.

Section 6310.7 (a): A person commits a summary offense if he/she intentionally and knowingly sells or furnishes nonalcoholic beverages to any person under 21 years of age.
Definition: "nonalcoholic beverages" means any beverage intended to be marketed or sold as nonalcoholic beer, wine or liquor having some alcohol content but does not contain more than 0.5% alcohol by volume.

Violation:

  • Maximum penalty: $300; 90 days imprisonment.

Liquor Code Title 47 Section 4-493.1, Unlawful acts relative to liquor, malt and brewed beverages and licensees

It shall be unlawful -

Furnishing liquor or malt or brewed beverages to certain persons

  1. For any licensee or the board, or any employee, servant or agent of such licensee or of the board, or any other person, to sell, furnish or give any liquor or malt or brewed beverages, or to permit any liquor or malt or brewed beverages to be sold, furnished or given, to any person visibly intoxicated, or to any minor.

The following university policy will govern all university social activities on and off campus at which alcoholic beverages will be served. University social activities are any social activities on university property or for which university funds or other resources are used. All members of the university have an individual and collective responsibility to adhere to the following policy:

  1. In all circumstances, the university expects its faculty, administrators, staff, students, alumni and their respective guests to conduct themselves, both individually and collectively, in a responsible manner. Illegal, abusive or excessive consumption of alcohol resulting in interference with the rights of other persons, personal injury or damage to property will result in severe disciplinary action, beginning with monetary sanctions, up to and including suspension or expulsion.
  2. In residential areas such as private residence hall rooms, campus apartments, fraternities or sororities, there exists an expectation of privacy; however, in these areas members of the university and their guests are still governed by the federal, state and local laws (or applicable laws for other jurisdictions where Carnegie Mellon operates) and will be responsible for their own behavior. In addition, any actions which violate the law and/or the rights of others, or in some way damage personal or public property, will result in the loss of the above-mentioned privacy rights and will be cause for university intervention and enforcement.
  3. Permission to serve alcoholic beverages at a social activity where students will or may be in attendance can only be obtained through the Dean of Student Affairs. Before permission is given, a dean, department head, faculty member or staff member who is on the exempt payroll must take personal responsibility for ensuring that alcoholic beverages are served only to those persons who are of legal age. Such responsibility may be assumed only after completing the Social Host Responsibility session offered through the Campus Police. This session will be offered periodically throughout the year. Please contact the Campus Police at x82323 for details.
  4. In addition, the following guidelines must be observed for all events:
    1. Social activities at which alcoholic beverages are served must take place in an area that is private or semi-private. Privacy is determined by the ability to control access to the area of the social activity and limit attendance to invited guests only. Alcoholic beverages are not to be consumed anywhere outdoors on the grounds of Carnegie Mellon. Therefore, alcoholic beverages are prohibited at social activities on the Cut, on the Mall, on the fraternity area grounds, on housing grounds, on the athletic field or on any other similar outdoor area either owned or used by the university.

A fee must never be charged for the service of alcohol where prohibited by applicable law or without obtaining the appropriate legal requirements to do so.

    1. Public advertising of events at which alcohol is to be served must not include any reference to alcohol, nor may such events be publicly posted outside of the university community.

All questions involving interpretation of this policy should be directed to the Office of the General Counsel.

Sanctions

In all of its actions, Carnegie Mellon seeks to uphold the laws of the jurisdictions in which it operates. Insofar as it is permitted by the laws of these political entities, including statutory and case law and the regulations of lawful agencies of these entities, the university will apply sanctions that could lead to a student being fined, suspended, expelled or referred for prosecution or an employee being disciplined, suspended, dismissed or referred for prosecution for violations of the university standards of conduct contained herein or violation of laws concerning unlawful possession, use or distribution of drugs and alcohol. The university has available a rehabilitation program which is mandatory in such instances where required by law.

The university will impose sanctions for actions that may or may not be violations of the law but are violations of university Standards of Conduct regarding illegal drugs and alcohol.

Applicable Federal and State Laws

The Pennsylvania laws concerning the use of alcoholic beverages and the sanctions for the violations of those laws are stated on pages 2-3.

The State of Pennsylvania, the United States of America and many other jurisdictions where Carnegie Mellon operates have enacted laws concerning what are commonly known as illegal drugs or controlled substances.

The Federal Penalties & Sanctions for Illegal Possession of a Controlled Substance are as follows:

21 U.S.C. 844(a)
First conviction: Up to one year imprisonment and fined at least $1,000 but not more than $100,000, or both.
After one prior drug conviction: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed two years and fined at least $2,500 but not more than $250,000, or both.
After two or more prior drug convictions: At least 90 days in prison, not to exceed three years and fined at least $5,000 but not more than $250,000, or both.
Special sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine: Mandatory at least five years in prison, not to exceed 20 years and fined up to $250,000, or both if:

  1. First conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds five grams.
  2. Second crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds three grams.
  3. Third or subsequent crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds one gram.

21 U.S.C. 853(a)(2) and 881(a)(7)
Forfeiture of personal and real property used to possess or to facilitate possession of a controlled substance if that offense is punishable by more than one year imprisonment. (See special sentencing provisions re: crack.)

21 U.S.C. 881(a)(4)
Forfeiture of vehicle, boats, aircraft or any other conveyance used to transport or conceal a controlled substance.

21 U.S.C. 844a
Civil fine of up to $10,000 (pending adoption of final regulations).

21 U.S.C. 853a
Denial of federal benefits, such as student loans, grants, contracts and professional and commercial licenses, up to one year for first offense, up to five years for second and subsequent offenses.

18 U.S.C. 922(g)
Ineligible to receive or purchase a firearm.

Miscellaneous
Revocation of certain federal licenses and benefits, for example, pilot licenses, public housing tenancy, etc., which are vested within the authorities of individual federal agencies.

See Page 7 for further information regarding Federal Trafficking Penalties.

Pennsylvania Penalties and Sanctions

Misdemeanors:

  1. Misrepresentation: It is unlawful for any person to acquire or obtain possession of a controlled substance by misrepresentation, fraud, forgery, deception or subterfuge.
    Penalty: Imprisonment for one year, a fine of $5,000, or both.
  2. Possession: It is unlawful for a person to knowingly or intentionally possess a controlled or counterfeit substance unless he/she is registered under the act or obtains the substance by use of a valid prescription.
    Penalty: In the case of a first offense, imprisonment for one year, a fine of $5,000, or both. In the case of a second offense, imprisonment for three years, a fine of $25,000, or both.
  3. Possession and distribution of a small amount of marijuana (30 grams of marijuana or eight grams of hashish): It is unlawful for a person to possess a small amount of marijuana for personal use; to possess it with the intent to distribute it; or to distribute it.
    Penalty: Imprisonment for 30 days, a fine of $500, or both.
  4. Use and delivery of paraphernalia: It is unlawful for a person to use, deliver or possess, with the intent of using or delivering, paraphernalia (such as grow kits, pipes, needles and roach clips) to grow, conceal or ingest drugs.
    Penalty: Imprisonment up to one year, a fine of $2,500, or both.

Felonies:

  1. Delivery: It is unlawful for a person to manufacture, deliver or possess, with intent to manufacture or deliver, a controlled substance by a person not registered under this act.
    Penalty: In the case of most opiates, imprisonment for 15 years, a fine of $250,000, or both; in the cases of most hallucinogens, imprisonment for five years, a fine of $15,000, or both; in the cases of most drugs available legally under prescription, imprisonment for three years, a fine of $10,000, or both.

Note: Manufacture means the production, preparation, propagation, compounding, conversion or processing of a controlled substance.

Chart on Federal Trafficking Penalties

Alcohol-related traffic accidents are the leading cause of death for teens. Alcohol slows reaction time, decreases muscle coordination and impairs vision.

Substance Abuse Counseling

Substance abuse can lead to dependency and addiction, with serious consequences for personal health and overall quality of life.

Health Risks Associated with the Use of Alcohol

Immediate Risks

  • Increased risk of accidents, injuries
  • Nausea
  • Gastritis
  • Vomiting
  • Blackouts
  • Unconsciousness
  • Death by aspiration of vomitus
  • Fatal overdose

Long-Term Risks

  • Increased blood pressure
  • Increased risk of heart attack
  • Brain damage resulting in permanent psychosis
  • Cancer of the mouth, esophagus or stomach
  • Liver damage, such as cirrhosis, alcohol hepatitis or cancer
  • Ulcers and gastritis
  • Pancreatitis
  • Birth defects
  • In males: testicular atrophy and breast enlargement
  • In women: increased risk of breast cancer

Health Risks Associated with Drug Use

Marijuana and Hashish

  • Chronic bronchitis
  • Decreased vital capacity
  • Increased risk of lung cancer
  • In men: lower levels of sex hormone testosterone and an increase in abnormal sperm count

Stimulants (such as cocaine)

  • Painful nosebleeds and nasal erosion
  • Intense "downs" that result in physical and/or emotional discomfort
  • Tolerance and physical dependence

Amphetamines ("speed," "uppers")

  • Malnutrition
  • Hallucinations
  • Tolerance, psychological and sometimes physical dependence

Depressants (barbiturates, tranquilizers, methaqualone)

  • Confusion, depression, loss of coordination
  • Tolerance, physical and psychological
  • Overdose causing coma, death
  • Can be lethal when combined with alcohol

Hallucinogens (LSD, PCP, DMT, STP, mescaline)

  • Hallucinations, panic, irrational behaviors (which can lead to increased risk of accidents, injuries)
  • Overdose leading to convulsions, coma, death
  • Possible birth defects in children of LSD users

Narcotics (heroin, morphine, codeine, opium)

  • Malnutrition
  • Hepatitis
  • Loss of judgment and self-control (which can lead to increased risk of accidents, injuries)
  • Development of tolerance
  • Overdose leading to convulsions, coma, death

Deliriants (aerosols, lighter fluid, paint thinner)

  • Permanent damage to lungs, brain, liver, bone marrow
  • Loss of coordination, confusion, hallucinations
  • Overdose causing convulsions, death

IV Drug Use

  • Shared needles places one at risk for HIV infection (the virus that causes AIDS)

Nicotine

  • Speeds up heartbeat
  • Increases blood pressure
  • Upsets the flow of blood and air in the lungs
  • Causes drop in skin temperature in the fingers and toes

Nicotine addiction is the most widespread example of drug dependence in the United States.

Counseling and Psychological Services for Students

Counseling and Psychological Services is available as a first resource to the student population for consultation about, identification of and treatment for substance abuse problems. Both individual and group psychotherapy are available through Counseling and Psychological Services. The center plays an active role in the educational programming regarding drug and alcohol use and abuse on campus, and in involving interested faculty members and staff in these programs.

The center also maintains an updated referral list so that, when appropriate, students can be referred to drug and alcohol treatment programs in the community. These referrals may be to inpatient or outpatient clinics (St. Francis Hospital, Gateway Rehabilitation Center), or to private practitioners who treat substance abuse problems. In addition, information about appropriate community twelve-step groups is available. Students may choose to participate in twelve-step programs in conjunction with treatment through Counseling and Psychological Services or elsewhere. Some of the twelve-step groups that are available include: Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Al-Anon and the Adult Children of Alcoholics Network of Greater Pittsburgh. Furthermore, when appropriate, students are referred to psycho-educational classes offered at St. Francis Hospital on substance abuse issues.

Counseling and Psychological Services is available as a first resource to the student population for consultation about, identification of and treatment for substance abuse problems.

 

Employees of the university who have a drug or alcohol problem are eligible to take advantage of the Employee Assistance Program.

Employee Assistance Program

As an institution of higher education, Carnegie Mellon provides an environment designed to facilitate excellence in teaching and research, recognizes and is aware of the importance of the university's human resources, and believes that the job performance of the individual determines the quality of the institution as a whole. Furthermore, the university recognizes that job performance may be affected by personal problems which, when addressed in a timely, confidential and professionally supportive manner, can be successfully resolved. Carnegie Mellon, therefore, has established an Employee Assistance Program (EAP), "sponsored" and paid for by the university, designed to facilitate an individual's efforts to resolve personal problems which can affect job performance and general well-being.

Employee Assistance Program

The Employee Assistance Program provides professional and confidential assistance to employees and their immediate families for addressing personal problems. Typical problems which can be addressed through EAP include stress, marital, family/child, alcohol and drug abuse, and psychological and financial problems.

 

Where to Go if You Need Help

Campus Resources

Campus Police

(412) 268-2323

Counseling and Psychological Services

(412) 268-2922

Student Health Service

(412) 268-2157

Human Resources (EAP)

(412) 268-4747

Student Life Office

(412) 268-2142

 

Pittsburgh Area Resources

Adult Children of Alcoholics

734-5596

Alcoholics Anonymous

471-7472

Al-Anon

683-7750

Alternatives Regional Chemical Abuse Program

381-2100

Center for Addiction Services

622-4511

Center for Chemical Dependency Treatment

622-4511

Gateway Rehabilitation

604-8900

Men's Rehabilitation Center (Salvation Army)

481-7900

Mercy Treatment Center

734-1010

Narcotics Anonymous

391-5247

United Way Help Line

255-1155


Statement of Assurance



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