Media Advisory: Carnegie Mellon Experts Speak on Cybersecurity Research, Online Safety-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Media Advisory: Carnegie Mellon Experts Speak on Cybersecurity Research, Online Safety

As Threats Grow, Cybersecurity Rises in Global Importance; CMU TV Studio Available for Interviews

Contact: Ken Walters / 412-268-1151 / walters1@andrew.cmu.edu

PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University is home to some of the leading researchers on cybersecurity threats, which the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has declared the most serious economic and national security challenges facing America.

As the DHS focuses more attention on such threats, CMU faculty continue to provide valuable research on cybersecurity issues, including the use of facial recognition software to identify individuals, developing protections against malicious software and teaching children about online safety. Carnegie Mellon CyLab, one of the largest university-based cybersecurity research and education centers in the U.S., is a world leader in researching and developing solutions for cybersecurity issues.

Some of Carnegie Mellon's experts include:
  • Dena Haritos Tsamitis of CMU's Information Networking Institute, which recently launched an educational mobile app that engages kids in a game about online safety when accessing social networking websites via their mobile devices;
  • Alessandro Acquisti, whose research found it was possible to predict a person's social security number by using facial recognition software and social media sites;
  • David Brumley, who won a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for his research on malicious software analysis to help make computer software and systems safer;
  • Lorrie Cranor, who has authored more than 80 research papers on data privacy issues and led the development of Anti-Phishing Phil, an animated game that teaches computer users how to recognize email phishing attacks;
  • Jason Hong, who can discuss secure home computing and security issues related to mobile devices and applications.
CMU TV Studio: We can connect these experts to your outlet through Carnegie Mellon's state-of-the-art TV studio. Working with Pittsburgh International Telecommunications (PIT), we offer domestic and international connectivity via satellite and fiber. PIT owns and operates one of the largest satellite facilities in the world. Please contact Ken Walters at walters1@andrew.cmu.edu or 412-268-1151 for more information and to make arrangements.

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