Carnegie Mellon University

News Clips - September 12, 2008

From September 5 to September 11, Carnegie Mellon Media Relations counted 265 references to the university in worldwide publications. Here is a sample.

National

700-ton ground bot pushes trust envelope
Wired | September 9
Carnegie Mellon University, whose team placed first at Urban Challenge, is partnering up with tractor-maker Caterpillar to build the world's largest ground robot: a 700-ton robo dump truck capable of hauling 240 tons of earth. Just to be clear: that's nearly 50 TerraMaxes crammed together. (Thanks to Bill Sweetman at Ares for the tip!)
http://blog.wired.com/defense/2008/09/httpwwwaviation.html

 

Sun and Xilinx ignite CMT development market with introduction of feature-rich, high-performance programmable OpenSPARC evaluation platform
MSN Money Central | September 8
"The OpenSPARC Evaluation Platform will help microprocessor pedagogy to leap out of the textbook into the students' hands," said James. C. Hoe, associate professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. "This is a powerful enabling asset in teaching and research, especially at a time when we are striving to understand how to best deploy and leverage parallelism in future microprocessor systems."
http://news.moneycentral.msn.com/provider/providerarticle.aspx?feed=PR&date=20080908&id=9110156

 

Design futures
Mechanical Engineering Magazine | September Issue
For the past half-decade or so, Levent Burak Kara, assistant mechanical engineering professor at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, has been developing a pen-like device that he hopes will some day soon take the place of the computer mouse. Kara has been working to make such a device practical for 3-D designers. After all, sketching is a much more intuitive way for engineers to design than is clicking a mouse around an image and clicking commands on a screen.
http://www.memagazine.org/contents/current/features/desfut/desfut.html

Education for Leadership

Theater grows from a love of acting
The New York Times | September 7
Still, there is progress. This year, outdoor productions in Irwin Park in New Canaan were not at the mercy of the weather — a first, made possible by a new $50,000 covered stage. The park was the site for “Twelfth Night,” directed by Ms. Libonati’s daughter, Allegra, a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon University. Allegra Libonati’s brother, Christian, played Sebastian and ran a summer apprentice program at the theater.
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/07/nyregion/nyregionspecial2/07peoplect.html?scp=2&sq=%22Carnegie%20Mellon%22&st=cse

Arts and Humanities

Artist looks at the re-use of former retail sites
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review | September 7
"I love the irony of local individuals selling used and antique items in a space built by a faceless, multinational corporation in order to move hundreds of identical items," says Astria Suparak, newly appointed director of the Miller Gallery at Carnegie Mellon University, who is the founding director of the Warehouse Gallery, a contemporary-art gallery overseen by Syracuse University.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/search/s_586652.html

 

Pittsburghese fascinates yinzers and non-yinzers alike
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review | September 9
Stuefen, meanwhile, practices his Pittsburgh accent, saying things like "dahntahn" (Downtown) and "Sahside" (Southside). That behavior is an example of "symbolic capital," said professor Barbara Johnstone, a linguist at Carnegie Mellon University in Oakland who has studied the Pittsburgh accent. People who want to be more accepted by Pittsburghers might cultivate their ability to speak the way they do. Even city officials or lawyers who plan to work with Pittsburghers might do so, Johnstone said.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/search/s_587289.html

Information Technology

Carnegie Mellon team recognized for helping crack ID thefts
KDKA-TV News | September 9
It was the biggest identity theft ring in history and until a local university stepped in, tens of millions of people faced having their debit or credit card numbers stolen. Now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are getting federal recognition. In places like Marshalls or TJ Maxx, you may have ended up like 40 million others, your credit card numbers hacked.
http://kdka.com/local/identity.theft.Encryption.2.810261.html

Biotechnology

Production of gold nanorods without the use of cytotoxic additives
Nanotechnology and Development News | September 8
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University in the U.S. and RWTH Aachen University in Germany have developed a new method for producing nanoparticles called gold nanorods without the use cytotoxic additives. Under the new process, synthesis takes place in an ionic liquid in place of water. The article says that rod-shaped gold nanoparticles are better able to efficiently convert light energy into heat than other gold nanoparticles and, due to this characteristic, may potentially have applications in cancer treatment. The article can be viewed online at the link below.
http://www.merid.org/NDN/more.php?id=1501

Environment

Company offers 'green' cleaning of buildings
The Peninsula | September 9
"Our board is research-based. And we are hoping to get help from Carnegie-Mellon to make us as environment-friendly as possible," said Shams Hasan, another of the five partners of KlearGreen. The others are Mohamed Balfaqih, Andrea Raggi and Rami Al Hammouri.
http://www.thepeninsulaqatar.com/Display_news.asp?section=Local_News&month=September2008&file=Local_News2008090623950.xml

Regional Impact

Company offers free search engine to Pittsburgh
Associated Press | September 11
A search engine developed by Carnegie Mellon University researchers will remain a free feature of the City of Pittsburgh's Web site for the long haul. The search engine Vivisimo.com gives computer users the results of their Web searches clusters grouped together by themes. The tool has been available on the city's Web site for years. But Vivisimo has agreed to extend the free service to the city for the long term. The tool can be used to navigate the city's Web site and to search the Internet.
http://ydr.inyork.com/ci_10435814

Local

U.S. Representatives check out research projects at Carnegie Mellon
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | September 5
Carnegie Mellon University's Collaborative Intervention Center turned into a showroom for U.S. Representatives John Murtha, D-Johnstown, Mike Doyle, D-Forest Hills, and Jason Altmire, D-McCandless, yesterday as they examined several research projects and demonstrations. The congressmen perused projects ranging from a battlefield robot that can examine potential explosives to computer chip-laden gloves that can help translate sign language.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/08249/909618-298.stm

International

Swallow the surgeon
The Economist | September 4
Metin Sitti, director of Carnegie Mellon University’s NanoRobotics Lab in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is using bacteria as biological motors to propel small spheres through fluids. Instead of relying on an external system for controlling their movements, Dr Sitti and a colleague use chemical signals to tell the bacteria what to do. In recent experiments they proved that they could stop and start the bacteria’s flagella simply by exposing them to two different kinds of substances. Successful steering of the bacteria will be the subject of further tests, says Dr Sitti, but could be done via chemotaxis—a process by which small organisms follow gradients in the concentration of a particular chemical in order to find food or escape from toxic substances.
http://www.economist.com/science/tq/displaystory.cfm?story_id=11999269

 

Sun, Xilinx ignite CMT development market
CIOL | September 9
"The OpenSPARC Evaluation Platform will help microprocessor pedagogy to leap out of the textbook into the students' hands," said James. C. Hoe, associate professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. "This is a powerful enabling asset in teaching and research, especially at a time when we are striving to understand how to best deploy and leverage parallelism in future microprocessor systems."
http://www.ciol.com/Semicon/SemiPipes/News-Reports/Sun,-Xilinx-ignite-CMT-development-market/9908110071/0/

 

In it for the large haul
The Engineer | September 9
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute are working with engineers at Caterpillar to develop autonomous large-haul vehicles used in mining operations. The Robotics Institute will adapt over a decade’s worth of its own research into self-driving vehicles for use with Caterpillar’s two largest haul trucks, each with payload capacities in excess of 240 tons.
http://www.theengineer.co.uk/Articles/307908/In+it+for+the+large+haul.htm