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May 5: Media Advisory: Carnegie Mellon Physicist To Discuss the Science and Fiction of "Angels and Demons"

Contact:

Jocelyn Duffy                       
412-268-9982                       
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu

Media Advisory:
Carnegie Mellon Physicist To Discuss the
Science and Fiction of "Angels and Demons"

Event: Carnegie Mellon University physicist Manfred Paulini will discuss science facts and fiction of the soon-to-be-released movie "Angels and Demons" in the free public lecture "Angels and Demons: The Science Revealed." Paulini will talk about the mystery of the missing antimatter and how future particle physics experiments will explore some of the secrets of the universe. An experimental particle physicist, Paulini is a member of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment that will start operation at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in the fall of 2009.

Angels and Demons is an action-packed thriller based on Dan Brown's best-selling novel that focuses on an apparent plot to destroy the Vatican using a small amount of antimatter, made using the Large Hadron Collider, that is stolen from CERN, the European particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland. The physics at the heart of Angels and Demons calls attention to what happens when matter and antimatter meet. The absence of practically any antimatter in the universe is crucial to our existence and understanding the absence of antimatter is one of the big challenges of particle physics.

To view a short video clip promoting the lecture, visit www.cmu.edu/news/news-notes/multimedia/angels_demons.mov.

When: 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, May 6

Where: Porter Hall 100, Gregg Hall, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pa.

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