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Aug. 24: Carnegie Mellon Announces Center for Africanamerican Urban Studies and the Economy 2009-10 Speaker Series

Contact: 

Shilo Raube
412-268-6094       
sraube@andrew.cmu.edu

Carnegie Mellon Announces Center for Africanamerican
Urban Studies and the Economy 2009-10 Speaker Series

PITTSBURGH—The Center for Africanamerican Urban Studies and the Economy (CAUSE) at Carnegie Mellon University will launch its 2009-10 speaker series with an opening reception at 4:30 p.m., Friday, Sept. 11, in the Danforth Lounge of the University Center. CAUSE aims to link the historian's interest in race, work and economic change over time with contemporary analyses of politics, the urban labor force and employment policies. Each year CAUSE sponsors a speaker series that features distinguished historians lecturing on African American history in the region and nation. 
   
Each talk in the CAUSE speaker series begins at 5 p.m. with refreshments served at 4:30 p.m. A book signing will follow each lecture. The lectures are listed below. The locations for the November, February and April lectures will be available at a later date.

Oct. 9: Kimberly Phillips, an associate professor of history and American studies at the College of William and Mary, will speak on "War, What is it Good For? Black Freedom Struggles, War, and the U.S. Military." The talk will take place in the Grand Room of the Tepper School of Business.
   
Nov. 20: Clarence Lang, an assistant professor of history at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will discuss "'Ne'er-Do-Wells,' 'Uncle Toms,' and the Jefferson Bank Boycott: Civil Rights Struggle and Class in Postwar St. Louis." Lang is the author of a new book, "Grassroots at the Gateway: Black Freedom Struggles and Class Politics in St. Louis, 1936-75."   
   
Feb. 12: Okezi Otovo, an alumna of Carnegie Mellon's History Department, is an assistant professor of history at the University of Vermont. Her lecture is titled "Making Better Babies and Perfecting the Race: Mothering and Nation-Building in Brazil."
   
April 9: Leslie Brown, an assistant professor of history at Williams College, will discuss "Plenty of Opposition...Which Has Been Growing Daily: Gender, Generation, and Change in the Jim Crow South." Brown is the author of the Organization of American Historians' Frederick Jackson Turner Award-winning book "Upbuilding Black Durham: Gender, Class, and Black Community Development in the Jim Crow South."

CAUSE is part of the Department of History within Carnegie Mellon's College of Humanities and Social Sciences. It develops programs of graduate and postdoctoral training, scholarly research, data collection, publications and education. For more information, including locations for each lecture as they're available, visit http://www.hss.cmu.edu/cause/.

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