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Sept. 15: Carnegie Mellon's Luis Rico-Gutierrez Receives David Lewis Directorship Appointment

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Eric Sloss                            
412-268-5765
ecs@andrew.cmu.edu

Carnegie Mellon's Luis Rico-Gutierrez Receives
David Lewis Directorship Appointment

Luis Rico-GutierrezPITTSBURGH—Luis Rico-Gutierrez, director of Carnegie Mellon University’s Remaking Cities Institute™ (RCI) in the School of Architecture, has been appointed to The David Lewis Directorship of Urban Design and Regional Engagement. The directorship, named after David Lewis, distinguished professor emeritus of urban design at Carnegie Mellon, was made possible by a gift from The Heinz Endowments.

The directorship will lead the RCI, which was created to augment the impact of the legendary Urban Laboratory™ and the Master in Urban Design, the flagship urban design programs in Carnegie Mellon’s School of Architecture.
    
Rico-Gutierrez will lead both faculty and administrative responsibilities in the Urban Laboratory, the Master of Urban Design program and the RCI. The establishment of this endowed position creates a permanent tribute to Lewis and his work while providing a lasting university model that enables individuals to conduct research, participate in teaching and engage in community service.
    
In June 2007, Luis Rico-Gutierrez was appointed director of the Remaking Cities Institute in order to ensure and expand Carnegie Mellon's leadership in education, community outreach and research in the field of urban design. Rico-Gutierrez has been with Carnegie Mellon's School of Architecture since 1996 and has become a key player in the urban design programs. He has served as associate dean of the College of Fine Arts since 2001, and was associate head of the School of Architecture from 2001 to 2004. In these two roles, he has advocated and supported new and existing educational opportunities in pedagogy, research and practice that has enhanced the academic experience of students and faculty, and contributed to the quality of life in the region.

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