Chuanbing Tang Receives Prestigious 2005 Chinese Government Award for Outstanding Self-Financed Students Abroad-Mellon College of Science - Carnegie Mellon University

Tuesday, July 25, 2006

Chuanbing Tang Receives Prestigious 2005 Chinese Government Award for Outstanding Self-Financed Students Abroad

Chuanbing Tang, fifth year student in the Matyjaszewski and Kowalewski groups, has received the 2005 Chinese Government Award for Outstanding Self-Financed Students Abroad. This award is granted across all fields of study in the world and was presented to only 54 Chinese students in the United States, eight of whom were chemists. The award, including a check and certificate, was presented in New York by the Consulate General of the People’s Republic of China on April 15. The ten awardees who were able to attend the award ceremony in New York came from top institutions such as Harvard, Princeton, Yale, MIT, Cornell, Brown and Boston College.

Chuanbing has developed self-assembled block copolymer templates for nanostructured carbons. His research work included synthesis, characterization and device development. Well-defined carbon nanoparticles and arrays of carbon nanowires have been designed targeting a wide range of applications, especially in energy storage/conversion devices and in display technologies.

The Carnegie Mellon group is currently working on using carbon nanoparticles as active materials in field emitter arrays for flat panel screen displays. This technology to produce carbon nanostructures also could be adapted to produce solar panels that convert sunlight into electrical energy. Other applications include the development of carbon-based nanosensors or high-surface area electrodes for use in biotechnology or medicine.

He has also been recognized as a Finalist for the 2005 ACS Richard A. Glenn Award from the Fuel Division for the best paper at a national meeting and has received the 2005 ACS Pittsburgh Section Polymer Group Student Award. This summer he will begin a post-doctoral position with Professors Ed Kramer and Craig Hawker at the Materials Research Laboratory at the University of California at Santa Barbara

By: Matthew Bittel